https://www.duolingo.com/musiclover23

Can you become fluent if you complete the whole tree?

musiclover23
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 3
4 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pont
pont
  • 25
  • 23
  • 18
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 397

Not with Duolingo alone, no. In particular, there's a little native-to-foreign translation practice, and (quite understandably) no conversation practice. The amount of vocabulary presented isn't sufficient for fluency either. But it will give you a good grounding of grammar and a decent core vocabulary, which is a good starting point on the road to fluency.

dqxxmvyvoedn

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lieryan
lieryanPlus
  • 25
  • 8
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 427

IMO, practicing native to foreign translation is probably not really that important to achieve fluency. If you want to become fluent, you need to think in the target language instead of translating from your native. Practicing native to foreign language translation probably only help you minimally for those; I believe it is best, if you want to achieve fluency, to practice talking or writing original thoughts in the target language. These are anyway aren't available in Duo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
pont
  • 25
  • 23
  • 18
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 397

If you want to become fluent, you need to think in the target language instead of translating from your native.

I agree: certainly, when I'm conversing in Italian, I do not formulate sentences in English and translate them before uttering them! However, doing translation exercises from English was extremely useful in getting me to this stage in a relatively short period of time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13

Not necessarily, this is Myth no. 3 (http://people.ucsc.edu/~ktellez/epr5.htm). I do agree that at some point we need to take of the training wheels, but the real question is when.

  • “...total immersion” programs such as Rosetta Stone are actually inferior solutions, as they deprive users of mother-tongue support that can be useful, if not critical, to adults’ ability to assess their progress toward learning the target language (Avand, 2009; Cook, 2001; Kern, 1994).( http://blog.brainscape.com/2010/04/false-promise-language-immersion)
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/javiersfz

No chance man.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OldSpiceGuy
OldSpiceGuy
  • 25
  • 25
  • 13
  • 5
  • 4

That would be an unrealistic goal. You should certainly be about the point where you can follow or engage in a simple conversation, ask directions, read a simple menu, etc. I'm just about through the Spanish one, and I can follow children's television shows, understanding the plot line, and catching about 75% of what is said. I can read a news article and understand 80% of it. But I'm usually pretty lost listening to talk radio. They talk faster than my brain can process it, even though I know most of the words. That said, I don't exactly have a talent for language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itastudent
itastudent
  • 17
  • 14
  • 10
  • 9
  • 2

I find Duolingo great to learn a basic vocabulary for the language you are interested in, and gives you chance to practice it providing you with a lot of examples. I don't think that if you only use Duolingo you'll be able to speak a language fluently, but it could be good to integrate it with individual study, a language class, and/or talking to native speakers.

I have recently completed my Spanish tree, and I'm pretty satisfied about the way my Spanish improved in the last few months, but I didn't just use Duolingo, but I have to admit I feel I benefited from using it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamyoung97
adamyoung97
  • 15
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 5
  • 2

@musiclover23 (and anyone else who wants to) -- check out this website: http://www.conversationexchange.com/ -- you set the language(s) you are learning as well as which you speak, and then you can look for people who have an opposite match to you, or people will write to you, and you can exchange Skype, WhatsApp or whatever else (or you can arrange to actually meet them if you want to practice face-to-face). I've already met some Hungarians and Spanish people who are learning English and there's nothing better than talking to a native.

And while you don't become fluent through Duolingo, it gives you a great foundation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Princessbg2014

It depends on how hard you work. You cannot just simply do then be fluent but you have to practice... allot, it takes dedication :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/musiclover23
musiclover23
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 3

Thanks for that, but what else do you need to do in order to achieve fluency? Do you polish up your vocabulary, take advanced classes, talk to others who are fluent in that language? It would be great if I could borrow some little tips!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
pont
  • 25
  • 23
  • 18
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 397

The resources I use in addition to Duolingo are:

  • Ankidroid on my smartphone for vocabulary drills, using both downloaded and self-made decks.
  • Reading in Italian. I recommend trying to find translations of books you already know, and/or books written in simple language. One of my earlier acquisitions for Italian was Italo Calvino's collection of folk tales -- simple language and easily guessable plots (kings, princesses, witches, castles, etc.).
  • Michel Thomas audio courses (strongly recommended for grammar and speaking, less good for vocabulary and listening).
  • Listening to Italian radio and podcasts ( stitcher.com was a good place to find these, though I downloaded the podcasts from the original sites rather than listening to them through stitcher itself)
  • Talking to real live Italians, preferably ones who'll correct my mistakes! Here I have an advantage since I live among real live Italians, but I've heard that italki.com is good for finding online conversation partners.

Hope this helps!

dqxxmvyvoedn

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/disneybecca

I think one of the best things to do for reaching fluency is try to evaluate what skill you feel is holding you back, then focus on improving it. Once you improve that skill, you'll notice a new area of weakness which becomes your new focus.

I've been using primarily native resources since completing my tree. Things targeted at language learners are usually too basic for me now. I also find that I pick up vocabulary better from reading, watching tv, and listening to music than I do by practicing flash cards.

Here are things I've used for Spanish (since I see you are learning that).

Programs to compliment Duolingo and help build your skills: Michel Thomas and Assimil

Video programs targeted at language learners (perfect as a transition to native materials): Mi Vida Loca from BBC, Destinos, and Extra

Reading: Veinte Mundos, Read and Think in Spanish, Better Reading Spanish, and Stories from Latin America/Spain/Mexico/Puerto Rico (each country is a different book)

Hulu has a lot of Spanish telenovelas that you can watch with subtitles. I suggest finding one with English subtitles to watch first (I'm enjoying La Tempestad). You can watch with the English subtitles while intently listening to the Spanish audio. If I have extra time, I enjoy watching from one commercial break to the next with Spanish subtitles, then rewind and watch the same portion with English subtitles to check my comprehension. Then I'll watch the next segment with English subtitles first, then rewind and watch it again with Spanish to see the vocabulary and sentences. After watching one novela with English, you'll probably be ready to watch with just Spanish subtitles.

Practicing with Spanish music also helps build vocabulary. I try to listen to a song at least once to see what I can hear, then listen again while following along with lyrics. Then I translate the lyrics so I know what the song is saying. Then I listen to the song whenever I listen to music and also try to sing along.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anubis2814

Living in Germany or finding a German community near you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peterdepelikaan

absolutely not...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_-C1-_
_-C1-_
  • 24
  • 4
  • 4

No. It would help to find a person who speaks English and the language you're learning. Sadly, I do not have such a person.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Taletad

i am actually native french, an i have started to learn english in school, but i really achieved fluency by going on american websites, and watching american gaming videos :p (but i'm far from perfect in written english)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LimitlessT

I took the initiative to learn from other platforms. After 2-3 months on Duolingo:

  • I enrolled in a French class at my Uni. So twice a week and I'm learning and practicing with other learners. Long story short - This has helped my speaking.

  • I watch French programmes (ones targetted at learners atm) - This has improved my ear for french IMMENSELY. Not only do you learn new words, you hear words you know if different tones, voices and used in various sentences.

  • Reading/writing.

The only area I'd say is lacking is speaking. If you're committed you will reach a point where you are able to understand/read/write well but being able thoughtlessly construct sentences with your mouth is the biggest challenge imo.

Like someone has already said, it helps to have someone who's learning with you and is on a similar level, but that's not easy to find.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
Mod
  • 25
  • 18
  • 18
  • 12
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 14

The tree will only show you how many lessons you have completed, not how well they stayed with you.

Review as much as you need and then see outside sources to expand what you know. Try to find material created by native speakers (for example, movies, music, conversation partners, restaurants and stores etc. all in your target language(s).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_undertoad

No.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/petergames
petergames
  • 17
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 8
  • 509

We at Gamesforlanguage also love Duolingo. (We had posted our review of the program in February 2014). However, I agree with most folks that you can't become fluent with any of the online programs, including ours!
In order to become fluent you have to practice to SPEAK. Without the funds to travel, you may be able to find some conversation partners either in person, on skype, or with other language communities. For other suggestions look at my post: "Foreign Language Learning with just ONE approach or program?"

4 years ago
Learn a language in just 5 minutes a day. For free.