"Estas du minutoj post la kvina."

Translation:It is two minutes after five.

September 27, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/daniel_bohrer

Estas tempo por taso da teo.

February 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp

Ĉu vi havas kuketojn?

March 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1889

It also accepts "It is 5:02."

May 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kmhog

Bone

October 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/gcdgfz

"It's 2 past 5" is enough :D

September 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Gresillon.org

Here you learn full sentences. Later you can make them shorter. In Esperanto I use "2a kaj 5"

September 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Cocio_16

Am I the only one to think that sentence is ambiguous? I wrote "There are two minutes after the fifth (minute)". Someone could say this to someone else who have not watches the last two minutes of a clip, for example.

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp

Perhaps, but the form is so well ingrained that very few Esperantists will think minutes here, not unless you stated it explicitly. Estas at the beginning of a sentence can be translated as either; "There is/are" or "It is/They are". Usually, when discussing time, the "it is" meaning takes precedence.

Your example of ambiguity might more likely be stated: Havos du minutojn plu, post la kvina minuto. However, since I don't like ambiguous timing on my YouTube clips, I might just say: Tiu ĉi havas sep minutojn. And without watches? Just look at the corner of your screen.

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Orangus

... why not minutojn? quantities.. no?

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gresillon.org

First, 'minutoj' is the subject of the verb 'estas' and not the object. Second, the verb 'estas' is not transitive, has never an 'n', does not describe an action of the somebody against something. Third, there is no rule that quantities needs 'n', but the 'n' can appear with quantities for other reasons.

Du minutoj post la kvina estas (nun). Du minutoj pasis post la kvina.
Mi havas du minutojN por fini la laboron.

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Orangus

In tips and notes of lessons on topic "numbers". There was an example: La ŝtofo estas du metrojn longa.

March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gresillon.org

Right, but not easy to explain. There can't be "La ŝtofo estas longa 2 metroj" since cloth is not meters. We must insert a preposition "La ŝtofo estas longa JE 2 metroj" for the relation between "longa" and "metroj".
In some cases, we can delete the preposition by adding "n" after the noon. So "je 2 metroj" becomes "2 metrojn". Now the sentence becomes «La ŝtofo estas du metrojn longa» or «La ŝtofo estas longa du metrojn» or even «La ŝtofo longas du metrojn»
Try just to understand, do not yet use it.

March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Orangus

I.. don't understand anything. What are these "prepositions", I am not falimiar with lingustic terms? The word "je" hasn't been explained yet, so I have no idea what could it mean.

I hope I will understand over time..

March 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto

To piggyback off what DavidLamb3 said, the word "preposition" is related to the words "pre" and "position." (I think David has one detail wrong.) What this means is that in a sentence, they come in the "pre position" -- that is, they come before a set of words and perform a certain function there. Examples of prepositions, as Berto said, are in,on, to, over, about, from, under, since. These words (in Esperanto anyway) always come before a "noun phrase" (another term, sorry.)

  • in the garden
  • to my friend
  • on the fence
  • over water
  • about three PM

and so on

Edit: One year later, I have a blog post which explains this in some detail.

https://blogs.transparent.com/esperanto/keys-to-understanding-esperanto-prepositions/

June 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gresillon.org

The given example came from another lesson. Don't try to understand now. Prepositions are: in, into, to, over, about, from, of, under, since....

March 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/blovemaple

I wrote "There are two minutes after five." but not correct. Why?

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/jungerstein

There are 420 minutes after five in the evening, or 1140 minutes after five in the morning.

May 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/blovemaple

For example... 5:02 is a deadline to do something, I can say "There are only two minutes after five. " It is a case for this sentence, isn't it...

May 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AdamScott794079

Wow that's early

April 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1889

5:02 pm is early?

April 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp

For a professional musician, it is.

April 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Holmskjell

Do Esperantists tend to give times as am&pm, North American-style? Or use a 24-hour clock? Or does it vary locally?

January 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Gresillon.org

I think they say the style they are used at home or they adapt to the local use. Same as we do in any language

January 17, 2018
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