"Tu bois l'eau froide."

Translation:You are drinking the cold water.

6 years ago

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Atlasthetitan

is "l'eau" feminine?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems
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Yes

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fraser498706

you are drinking cold water is correct in english and it sounds correct

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suchiththa

Not if you are trying to specify the cold water vs the hot water. If you wanted to generalise, you would use de l'eau, wouldn't you?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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fraser498706

Good English but a poor translation of the French. The French says it is the water Your translation leaves it up to the listener to figure out if you mean the water or some water.

It sounds good in English because English speakers do that all the time. But in this case you were asked to translate the French rather than what English speakers say a lot of the time. This is a difficult adjustment for English speakers to make. It is unimportant in English conversation but it is very important in French. Duo wants to know if you understand that.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tobibeer
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Sry, but this is NOT an English lesson. If English can mean both ways, peu importe si c'est autre chose pour les français!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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If the English translation of a French sentence leaves out a part of speech that is required in French, it is reasonable to mark such a translation as incorrect. Getting English speakers to use French articles correctly is a major hurdle in introductory French.

Duo insists on proper use of French articles because the French language does. The only way for the Duo computer to know if the student understands those practices is for the student to translate them correctly when asked to do so.

Students are free to treat French articles in the English speaking manner in writing or conversation to whatever extent they choose. But after using Duo they will understand that they are causing at least momentary confusion when they do that. They also mark themselves as an obvious foreigner who does not yet understand the basics of the language.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tobibeer
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All fair and square but if the exercise at hand was to translate to English, then it is not about paying attention of sounding wrong in French. When at some other time one would do the exercise in reverse EN->FR then I'm fine that it does have matter.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoyceGee1

I put that and was marked wrong. But in English you would never say the cold water. Not as applied to drinking it! You might say you jumped into the cold water for example.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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Then you would say "tu bois de l'eau froide" = you are drinking cold water. But this is a program to help learn grammar so not every sentence is going to be what you expect it to be.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Steph24305

How would you distinguish in French between "You drink the cold water" vs "You drink the water cold" (emphasising the temperature)? Would this have a different construction?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiviaHB
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I have the same question... Maybe in French, one would have to say, "You prefer to drink the water cold." ... Je préfère boire de l'eau froide .

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yuri353531

Again, no one who's first language is English would say 'the' cold water.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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English is my first language. I have no problem saying the cold water is on the right, the warm water is on the left. What could possibly be wrong with that?

Or even, you are drinking the cold water. It doesn't seem very cold but that is as cold as it gets around here.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SmallestGarden

I would. "Put the cold water into something else." Makes sense to me.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elaine222879

Simple typo with the additional g in there. However I think too literal insisting on the 'the' as we would not say that in English. X

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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I say it and I am a native English speaker. Although I accept your assertion that you never have and never would do so.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eva.lyus
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I think someone once told me, that french words with l'____ are often masculin.... is this an actual rule, or just rubbish?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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French words that start with l' are nouns that start with vowels and have an elision.

Basically you are saying that a greater number of nouns that start with a vowel are masculine.

Wictionary shows 15,000 pages for masculine and 11,000 pages for feminine French nouns. Making a completely unfounded assumption that first letter vowels are evenly distributed across both genders, then there is 33 per cent greater likelihood that l' will be followed by a masculine noun. All of this assumes that Wictionary's indexing of French masculine and feminine nouns is reliable.

Because of the wide assumptions I made in this comment it's better to just remember the gender rather than try to figure it out from a grammatical device. (Although I wish there was some way to figure it out besides practice.)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eva.lyus
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I already realised, while practicing with duo, that this "helping advice" of a friend is more or less useless... ^^ thank you for the link and the mathematical evidence.... so back to accepting french genders...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shristi31933

What is the difference between froid and froid

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suchiththa

Do you mean between froid and froide? Froid is used if the noun is masculine, and Froide is used if the noun is feminine.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MonaLee44

is it just me, or the audio has an additional "a" after saying "Tu bois" O_O

it threw me off when i was just listening to the audio and not looking at the words

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewSnijders

BTW, we do put the adjective after the object sometimes. It may not be proper but I can absolutely hear it if you were surprised. "You drink (your) milk warm???" if it can also be a means by which it is done, it sounds normal.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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Your inverted form turns it into a question. It also turns warm into an adverb describing how you drink milk. The surprising thing is how you choose to drink the milk, not surprise that the milk somehow got warm.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarieB521235

would you drinknthecwater cold make sense is french?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liam299257

Would this be said differently in french "You drink the water cold". It seems to be wrong :-(

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/George792719

Yes "you are drinking the cold water" is a direct literal translation, but who ever says that in English? Everybody says "you are drinking cold water" no 'the' required.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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This water isn't cold enough. I want to drink the cold water instead.

You are drinking the cold water. When the temperature is a hundred and thirty degrees outside that is as cold as the water gets coming out of the tap.

English speakers routinely drop the article when speaking, forcing the listener to figure out if the or some or all is intended. But French requires you to include the article and it has to be the correct one.

If you try to force translations of French into the English pattern because that is how you prefer to speak, you will find it difficult to deal with French articles.

Try to get into the habit of translating French articles into your English answers even if the English doesn't require them That way you won't forget to include the articles when using French. After all, Duo is testing you on your ability to translate, not write something different but is pretty close to the original.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DraeWright
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I can see that this is good advice. Thanks.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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I'm in the process of doing my annual run through the French tree. I notice that Duo has changed its policy with regard to indefinite articles.

I have had a dozen questions where Duo marked the inclusion of the indefinite article into the English translation of the French, as being incorrect.

This is a reversal of previous practice. They use to at least point out the failure to translate indefinite articles and generally went so far as to mark them wrong.

Because English speakers routinely drop the indefinite article when at all possible, some of them complain mightily when forced to include them. I guess Duo gave up fighting with them and just marks the inclusion some in the English translation as incorrect. This page has several comments from students who strongly object to using even the definite article. You can imagine the resentment expressed in comments for previously being marked wrong for leaving out some water even though de/des (some) is clearly included in the French sentence that they say they translated correctly.

Therefore I am changing my advice to you. When translating the de/des article from a French sentence just do it in your head. But use the English practice and drop it from your answer.

When doing a faithful translation of I am buying some long yellow beans from French to English, Duo marks you wrong if it actually include some in your answer.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreaHarr19

I just typed this same French response to the English sentence and got it wrong. However you just gave me that was exactly what I typed in response to the English and it is correct. I think that that particular sentence needs to be corrected.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unknowntyper

You are drinking cold water... this should be correct.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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You are wrong. You are not translating the French sentence given to you. You responding with something else instead.

If you don't understand why your answer is not correct, read the many comments on this page that explain why.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LallyJ

In English you would not automatically put the definite article before 'cold water'. You would simply say you are drinking cold water.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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But you aren't being asked to write what you would automatically say in English. You are being asked to translate the French sentence. It includes the.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/justingiov

I thought eau was masculine, as are most words ending in-eau. That's what threw me off.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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"Eau" is a feminine noun.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mtzguido

Shouldn't this be "tu bois DE l'eau froide"? Does that have a different meaning?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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Using the partitive « de l' » would make it "you are drinking cold water", not "THE cold water".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tssw
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Didn't we learn to always use "the" in French even though it is absent in English? Why does the sentence have to translate "the" water in English?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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This is simply an exercise on how to say "...the cold water" (l'eau froide) and not "cold water" (de l'eau froide). When the partitive « de l' » is used, it is not translated at "the". But when the definite article is used--not the partitive--it will be "the cold water". Does that help?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanNight
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It is too literal in demanding "the water" . We wouldn't say you are drinking the water would we ??

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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Why not?

What if I wanted to tell someone they were drinking the water. Not just water but the water. Water that is different in some way from just any water.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gudrunbiet

How would you translate: You drink cold water? Je pense que c'est la meme traduction en français....

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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The problem is that English speakers drop the article (as you did) and leave it up to listener/reader to decide if the sentence means some cold water or the cold water.

In French, you have to specify. You can't just leave it up to context to make it clear. You have to include de/des or le/la depending on what you are trying to say.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandra910891

Confusing

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonBlissett

What is wrong with "You drink cold water " ?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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Nothing wrong with your sentence. It just doesn't translate all the words in the French example so it isn't the correct answer.

That l' in front of eau is there for a reason. You might think it is unimportant but French speakers think it is so important that they require it, or an alternative, to be included in this sort of sentence.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonBlissett

Thank you for your comments. So have I translated "Je bois de l'eau froide " ? I intended to say : I drink cold water, not tepid or any other kind of water.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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You are intending that the meaning be taken as drinking some cold water. De l'eau expresses that.

If you were intending to talk about the cold water, present or understood, then l'eau is the way to do it.

The problem for English speakers is that while you can just avoid even making the distinction in ordinary conversation, French requires that you specify which one you mean. Duo will sometimes let you get away with not mentioning the some thingy but they always want the definite article included when applicable.

1 month ago
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