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  5. "Ólann sé an cupán caife."

"Ólann an cupán caife."

Translation:He drinks the cup of coffee.

September 28, 2015

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

Why an cupán caife and not cupán an caife?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Cupán an chaife would be “the cup of the coffee”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmoriley

Would an cupán caife also be the coffee cup?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoreenPrimrose

Is caife genitive as well as nominative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.W.Degan

Yes, it is. That much I know, though I'm still struggling with how the different genitive constructions (combinations of definite vs. indefinite) work in sentences like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pjf6131

is this idiomatic? Puzzling over where the "of" is in the irish sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

"of" is a genitive marker in English.

"The book's cover"/"the cover of the book" - clúdach an leabhair
"The man's house"/"the house of the man" - teach an fhir
"the man of the house" - fear an tí
"the top of the hill" - barr an chnoic

The genitive is also used in Irish to specify the contents of a container - mála plúir, bucéad péinte, buidéal fíona, gloine beorach


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wauld

So "cupán caife" can translate to "a coffee cup" or "a cup of coffee" depending on context?

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