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  5. "Il est déjà trop tard."

"Il est déjà trop tard."

Translation:It is already too late.

January 4, 2013

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RKSMT

How would you say, He is again too late, since apparently that is wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandrosRuiz

I guess it would be "Il est encore en retard"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonardoPolly

Is "Il est encore trop en retard" correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/praznin

How do we know that this isn't about a person who is already too late?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibuco

"Il est en retard"?

"Tard simply means late. En retard means late (not punctual)" (src: Googie)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

Indeed, how does one distinguish between 'it' being too late, and 'he' being too late?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth

"Il est tard" is strictly about time. "He is late" is "Il est en retard."

  • It is too late = Il est trop tard
  • He is too late = Il est trop en retard

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brian648024

Thanks, that helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sjaitkaas

Shouldn't it be: "C'est déjà trop tard." ? Because trop tard is a modified adverb? Or is it because 'déjà' comes first?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathnainiel

When telling time, it's always "Il est". However, according to: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081020192155AALKjB7 http://www.french-linguistics.co.uk/grammar/c_est_il_est.shtml when saying it's too late, not in regard to the hour of the day, but to an opportunity that has passed you can use "c'est".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keshet59

Oh, boy. What I hear in my head in Georges Moustaki singing "Il est trop tard," "Pendant que je dormais, pendant que je rêvais, Les aiguilles ont tourné- il est trop tard. Mon enfance est si loin, il est déjà demain- Passe passe le temps, il n'y en a plus pour très longtemps."

(a musical interlude from my high school French classes in the 70's)

There must be a subtle distinction between il est and c'est.. trop tard. Can anyone explain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VEddie

The basic difference is when a noun is followed by an "Il est"

For example:

Il est un homme. -> Wrong, because the noun "un" is there, the correct way would be "C'est un homme."

The same happens with pronouns (mon/ma ; son/sa ; ton/ta), if after an Il est or Elle est is a pronoun, you must use C'est.

When it comes to adjectives, you'll most likely use Il est/Elle est. There's a really good table I found where it explains this in a few examples in a site.

For the site: http://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/cest-versus-il-elle-est

For the table (it's in the site too): http://www.frenchtoday.com/giveaway/c-est-versus-Il-est-FrenchToday.pdf


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allie469225

Thanks for the link to the chart. That looks like it will be really helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sally410

Was the song depressing or just meant to be a philosophical? Tbh, both would strike me, but that may be my age! It seems 'sadly beautiful'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tatainUS

Why isn't "he is already too late" not accepted as correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth
  • It is already too late = Il est déjà trop tard
  • He is already too late = Il est déjà trop en retard

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gofisch

Could it also be elle est? If not why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanKirwan1

No - French always uses the masculine 'il' when referring to the time of day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4sily

When can one use "toujours" as "already" and why is it not acceptable here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kurac-od-20centi

il est deja trop retard, what does it mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth

"Retard" is a noun, meaning "lateness." You need to use "en retard" to describe a person. So your sentence does not mean anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NinoBabi

I wonder how anyone who chooses such name can understand anything...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harin_Ion

hello there Duolingo friends, isn't : "it is already very late " also an acceptable answer eh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/haedehr

I guess, that would be "il est déjà TRÈS tard".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neil-VA5WX

I also think "He is already too late" should be accepted. It would be implied or inferred through the context, I imagine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth

"Il est tard" is strictly about time. The impersonal "il" used here is the same one used for telling time: "Il est dix heures" par exemple.

To describe people that arrive after a scheduled time, use "en retard." So "he is late" is "Il est en retard." (And if you want to use a more familiar expression, you can say "Il est à la bourre" for "he is running late.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonKing341501

Why does this translate as 'It is already too late', and not 'he is already too late'? Can it not be either?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koro359505

TI had the same question and the explanation I found is this: "tard" is just an adverb, so it doesn't work as an adjective. If you were to say "he is already too late" you would say something like "Il est déjà trop retardé".

Edit: should have said "en retarde". Apparently "retardé" has a different connotation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth

Uh, please try not to use "retardé" when saying someone is late. Use "en retard" instead.

  • He is already too late = Il est déjà trop en retard.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth

No. "Il est tard" is strictly about time.

"He is late" is "Il est en retard."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barry542665

Surely it can mean both “He is” and “It is”. If not, what is French for “He is already late”?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth

Repeating what is already mentioned above:

"Il est tard" is strictly about time. The impersonal "il" used here is the same one used for telling time: "Il est dix heures" for example. The "il" doesn't refer to any person or object.

"He is late" is "Il est en retard." To describe people that arrive after a scheduled time, use "en retard." So "he is late" is "Il est en retard."

  • It is already too late = Il est déjà trop tard
  • He is already too late = Il est déjà trop en retard
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