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"¿Eres nuevo?"

Translation:Are you new?

4 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/skylockwood

no I am used.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Steck461

Secondhand :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielDayot
GabrielDayot
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My deepest condolence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucky101man

n00b? Isn't accepted yet

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gijira

literally unlearnable

duolingo staff pls

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/N0R5K
N0R5K
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Nah, refurbished! :D Lowers my price a ton. ?B^)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/QuintanillaJon

Isn't Ser used for a permanent characteristic? Wouldn't Estar be more suitable here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leaveras

I am not sure how to explain, but it is right to use SER in cases like "are you new (in the group)? Are you new (in the city)? etc". If you use ESTAR it sounds like you are an object that can be classified as new or old. But again, I am not sure how to explain it, I am a native Portuguese speaker and it is the same in Portuguese.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/QuintanillaJon

I think I'm starting to get it now after working through a bunch of examples, thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikita397830

Ser is used for identity characteristics. Estar is for conditions and states of being. Permanent vs temporary is an oversimplification and being new is categorized as in the former.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/juanantoni736050

When a person arrive to a place or site "es nuevo", for example : I am new in the university

When a thing is not used "es nuevo", for example: My dress is new Whe a thing have some time and is not used or spoiled: "esta nuevo" for example: "the car have five years but it is new"

Normally "ser" it is used for a permanent condition and "estar" it is used for the condition circustancial.

The people are young, the things are new. The different bewteen has very difficuties for anglophone people and the vocabulary Spanish has many shades

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

I've heard this "permanent" vs "conditional" explanation before, but it doesn't seem to hold up very often. I find it more confusing than helpful.

For example:

¿Donde esta el baño? (Is it going to be there later?)

Estoy casado. (But don't expect it to last?)

Está muerto. (But, ya know, zombies....)

Even the example you provided, "New in the university".....you're only new for a relatively short time, but "es nuevo", not "esta nuevo"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Konstantin262
Konstantin262
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Shouldn't "Are you new one?" be correct as well? I'm not a native english speaker, hope it is not a stupid question =)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phoenixdaisy

If you wished to use one in the sentence, it would need to be "Are you a new one?" but this would have required the Spanish sentence to be "¿Eres un nuevo?" as well.

The only noun in the sentence "¿Eres nuevo?" is the implied "tú" (¿Tú eres nuevo?) which is the "you" of "Are you new?" Nuevo is not itself a noun, so does not equate to "n00b", "newbie" or the phrase "new one", it is an adjective applied to tú, so new also applies directly to you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gomes-Bruno

young and new are the same thing.. no!?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeDimen

Non. Young refers to age of mammals while new refers to freshness.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eskim0
Eskim0
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I had some Spanish classes in grade school. Our teacher was from Mexico and pronounced "eres" air-ess like the female voice at the top of this comments section. The male voice in the original question pronounced it air-eh with a slight lisp at the end. Is he speaking a different Spanish dialect?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/allipharr

In parts of Spain they drop the "s", particularly at the end of words.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

I have a lot of problems with DuoLingo's enunciation of "eres". I rarely can hear the two syllables (sounds like "es" to me).

(Edit to add: This got down-voted? Lol. Okay. Whatever!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiveMeAndy

I totally misheard the audio and put "El es nuevo," or "Is he new?" Does that make sense?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

You're not the only one with this problem. I think (I hope) it's just the DuoLingo speaker (presumably generated, not recorded).

They sound similar in any case, which in most cases would be either clarified by context, by the speaker themselves enunciating more carefully, by using the optional pronoun, or by using physical indicators (eye movement, hand gesture)....and, once in a while, it might actually lead to confusion, "Él es?" "No, no....TÚ eres nuevo."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-LiamAnderson-
-LiamAnderson-
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No, no soy nuevo. Soy huevo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamcartwright.

how would you even use this....... (at a goodwill) hi barbie are you new?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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In English you'd say "Are you the new guy?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamcartwright.

oh ok thanks

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

In English it is also used as an mild insult. Intending, "Are you new" at whatever task was failed. Dunno if it's used the same way in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamcartwright.

oh ok that makes since too

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamcartwright.

thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Greg95617

So... I have a screenshot where I answered this exactly right and it scored wrong. Lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abyo11

Pu

10 months ago