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  5. "Jeg bød ham på pasta."

"Jeg bød ham pasta."

Translation:I treated him to pasta.

October 4, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonathan.w19

An odd thing to say in American English. Maybe if you paid for his serving of pasta, at a restaurant or something...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WildSage

Yeah, this wording is odd. You invite people to a meal. IF you are serving something particular you invite them for it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jasonctoms

This is definitely correct. You invite FOR something specific.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanctMinimalicen

I disagree. This sounds very natural to me, in a context like "My son did very well in his choir concert, so I treated him to pasta--his favorite food!" Or something like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

I'd use "with" for that purpose


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

Then it would become a medical process. "Treating someone with pasta" is unlikely to be of any curative benefit at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanctMinimalicen

That would work too, but it sounds less natural. It sounds almost too literal. Whereas, there's an idiomatic ring to the phrase "treat [person] to [thing]."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

this sounds extremely odd to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanctMinimalicen

Ohhh, that would make sense. The "treat to" structure would sound odd in Irish English. Chalk it up to the diversity of the English language! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanctMinimalicen

Well, I can't explain your dialect any more than you can explain mine. All I know is that it is used all the time in the continental United States where I live.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

aah I see. I speak irish English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griffindd

I don't know any online dictionaries of Hiberno-English. Oxford online though defines treat with as Andy describes it (and adds the sense of "treated with chemicals") and defines treat to to mean "to pay for something enjoyable"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

what does this mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 251

To invite someone over for pasta.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

I never heard this in English before :o thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/merry-bee

I'm a native (American) English speaker and the translation looks perfectly sensible to me. Maybe it's a regional thing. It may not necessarily be about inviting someone over for pasta; it could also be taking him out for pasta. It means that the speaker is somehow providing (making, arranging for, buying) a treat for the recipient.

I don't know if the intended meaning of the Norwegian sentence is the exactly the same. From what I understand, "å by" can mean different things depending on context, including "to invite" or "to offer".

These discussions that explore the meanings of multi-tasking words are very helpful to me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/londoncallling

Is this the past of be or by? It's always the little words that are confusing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Of 'å by'. The past of 'å be' is 'ba(d)'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/otsogutxi

What a nice thing to do:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FridelLamson75

American English is a little different at times


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jakob1145

Treating someone to pasta, inviting someone to have pasta, and offering someone pasta seem like three very different things. Offering someone pasta could go either way: they could accept of decline, while treating someone to pasta implies that they accepted. Can someone explain why all of these can be fused into a single expression?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

Because it's English. A language that has maybe three times the number of words that Norwegian has (OED) , and so has a multiplicity of overlapping subtle meanings available, making it the 'bane' of those who would fully learn it
(*affliction, blight, burden, calamity, curse, despair, downfall, misery, nuisance, pest, plague, ruin, ruination, scourge, torment , trial, trouble...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyLowings

I for one, would not think pasta is much of a fancy treat. Perhaps it is, compared to grøt.

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