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  5. "Beklager å måtte skuffe dere…

"Beklager å måtte skuffe dere."

Translation:Sorry to have to disappoint you.

October 5, 2015

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt92HUN

Would "beklager seg" mean "complain", like in German?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UtkarshSyng

Wouldn't 'å måtte' be in the past tense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"å måtte" is the infinitive, while "måtte" on its own is the past tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NuggetPls

I don't understand why it is Å måtte instead of å må? Isn't måtte the past form? In fact I don't understand any of the past forms of modal verbs since most of them don't seem to actually be used for the past


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Å måtte" is the infinitive, while "måtte" on its own is the past tense.

å måtte spise = to have to eat
jeg må spise = I have to eat
jeg måtte spise = I had to eat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JieZhang12

Why can't "apologize" be accepted here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anamorphism

just wouldn't be natural to say in english.

  • (i am) sorry to have ...
  • (my) apologies to have ...
  • i apologize to have ...

would all be natural sounding to me as a native of southern california.

apologize just requires the 'i' for some reason, even in informal speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxThePilot

This phrase should actually be: "Sorry to have to disappointed you.". It is much more common to express it in this way in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anamorphism

i've never heard that and it screams completely broken grammar to me, but languages change in fun ways all the time.

maybe it's people merging 'sorry to have had to disappoint you' and 'sorry for having disappointed you'? those are both talking about the past though. 'sorry to have to disappoint' is talking about the present or near future.

where are you from?

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