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  5. "Il cuoco ha la crema al cioc…

"Il cuoco ha la crema al cioccolato."

Translation:The cook has chocolate cream.

January 5, 2013

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Speranza

''crema'' is 'creme patisserie', so ''crema al cioccolato'' is chocolate flavoured custard. ''Panna'' is cream.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philster043

Thanks a lot for that clarification. That helped.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freespiritedgirl

Ti rigrazio Speranza, adesso è più chiaro :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brenda426600

I wrote "The cook has the chocolate cream" which was an accurate translation but I got it wrong. What gives? "La" means "the," so I included it. The scoring thing needs to on be fixed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2519

Italian sometimes uses definite articles differently than we do in English. Just because a word is used in one language does not guarantee it's appropriate in another language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena18

Actually, now that someone in another discussion provided a lovely explanation of what "chocolate cream" actually IS (a filling for eclairs, etc) the sentence makes perfect sense to me in English AND in Italian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gedung

kaley cuoco is penny of the big bang theory :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peter2108

The english translation makes no sense. "The cook has XXXX" must be a mass term like 'typhoid' or 'gold'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bookworm51

Chocolate cream is a mass term.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tanjabcn

The english translation makes no sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LatecomerLaurie

FYI - we don't have a food in the U.S. called "chocolate cream," so this could be part of our confusion. We might say "chocolate custard," if this is what is meant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

Chocolate custard is an accepted translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2519

The way I understand it, regardless of the way this lesson is programmed into Duolingo, "custard" is the more accurate translation of "crema".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donnamarie1766

What is the difference between "il cuoco" and "l'cuoco"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2519

"Il cuoco" is the correct way to say "the cook." "L'cuoco" makes no grammatical sense because "cuoco" begins with a consonant and "l'" is only for (masculine, singular) nouns that start with a vowel: l'uomo, l'ape, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodolfoRod969975

Il cuoco ha crema al cioccolato was wrong for me. I had to add il cuoco ha (la) crema al cioccolato. Is the first way i wrote it wrong? I swear its sounds right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katherinemspeed

Seriously guys, what is chocolate cream, I am not understanding, is it like a custard cream - the biscuit?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FindingJackie

This might be just me drawing parallels between Italian and other languages, but isn't "la" used when you know exactly which thing you are looking for? For exemple, if I'm looking for a bowl, any bowl, I might say "una ciottola", but if I'm looking for a specific bowl which I was telling my friend about, I would use "la ciottola".

Here, I feel like "Il cuoco ha la crema al cioccolato" would be the answer to a question like "Who has the custard" or "where is the custard" (the one that was prepared, as everyone in the conversation knows which custard they are speaking of: The cook has the custard). The English translation without an article seems like the cook just has some custard nobody knew about...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2519

Not in this case, no. This is just how Italian talks about food. In English, we can use nouns like they're adjectives, so we can say "flavor food" or "ingredient food", but in Italian they can't do that, so they say "food to the flavor" or "food of ingredient".

Even in English, when we use the long-form possessive, we use "the": "start of the day"; "head of the class"; etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FindingJackie

Oh, it's not the "al cioccolato" that bothers me. It's the sudden disappearance of the article before "crema" in the English translation. English isn't my native language, but I always thought the article could only disappear like that when it doesn't matter which thing it is. (So the answer given in English, "The cook has chocolate cream" would mean he has "some chocolate cream". Meanwhile, the Italian sentence uses a definite article, so I don't understand why the translation isn't "the cook has the chocolate cream"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2519

I used to think I understood how it worked, but I was wrong. All I can say is that different languages use the definite article differently. The nuances where we use it or not in English are different from the nuances where they use it or not in Italian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexandra1394807

Isn't it chef instead of cook. I have never heard the term cook,always chef.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ripiglina

The cook has the chocolate cream. Is there really a reason for that not to be accepted given it's "la crema al cioccolato?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lakii10

I said cream chocolate and it is not correct. Maybe its not but i know the meaning...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2519

There is no such thing as "cream chocolate". In English, the descriptor comes before the noun, so it needs to be "chocolate cream".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/La_Cavalletta

Why is it ordered that way? Chocolate cream and not cream chocolate. Same with acqua minerale frizzante. Why isnt it frizzante minerale acqua?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2519

The Romance languages don't use nouns as though they were adjectives the way English does. Italian says "food to the flavor" or "food of ingredient", English says "flavor food" and "ingredient food". And in the Romance languages, adjectives tend to come after nouns, where in English they almost always come before the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindseyRuth

I am confused about the new concept "al" and how it relates to this sentence. In this sentence the "correct" translation is "chocolate cream" but because "al" means "in the" or "at the" it said I translated this wrong. I'm lost.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philster043

The Italian preposition "a" can mean "to," "at," or "in," depending on how you use it in context. I think they leave the definition "in" out of the list of meanings for "a" because it doesn't exactly say that, as we don't say "chocolate in custard" or "chocolate in cake" in English either. It's just expressing that they are both mixed in some way (or) both part of the same food serving.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ripiglina

It's a thing when talking about food, especially ingredients, in Italian. It's a cultural language tick.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2519

* tic

A tick is a flea's partner in crime.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claudinei516800

I can't speak this... :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda259347

Just a comment. This is exactly what i posted - tho I spelled cioccolato with 2 ls and one c. There needs to be a report option that contests the error. My goal is to speak Italian, not spell it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuttFitness

May i recommend pimsleur to you. There are 5 levels to italian and its a full on audio course. Many public libraries have it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda259347

I am familiar with them, and probably will use it. I have a good ear for languages, and I always try to get up to speed on basics before we travel. It's been 15 years since we were in Florence, and my Italian is rusty, to say the least. The listening and typing portion is definitely improving my understanding, I just get frustrated when i misspell something and although the grammar is correct, it's still wrong. Grazie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Migajita3

I did not get the word ha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva740599

The *la in the sentence is confusing me because I know la in Italiano means the so why do they said I'm wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2519

It would help to know how you answered the question.

But keep in mind: Different languages say things differently. Different languages have different grammar rules. Italian is not English with different words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilBergma1

This should translate as "has the chocolate cream"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuttFitness

Apparently Italians eat chocolate cream with coffee, with a side of gelatto and water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hd186

Are you ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ serious?! I put an extra T in "cioccolato". This isn't a God damned spelling contest. I have learned nothing and have only become angry with the programmers behind this. I hope you're ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ proud of yourselves, you bunch of pederasts.


[deactivated user]

    the cook has a sausage LOOOL


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/micahlarroque

    I'm pretty sure "the cook has chocolate cream." can also be translated to "Il cuoco ha cioccolato crema."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fra

    no, it doesn't make sense in italian "il cuoco ha cioccolato crema"..you can't understand if he has chocolate, cream or both..the preposition "a" (+ article "la" + noun "cioccolato") tells how is the cream is..

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