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  5. "Sie isst einen Nachtisch."

"Sie isst einen Nachtisch."

Translation:She is eating a dessert.

October 6, 2015

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tesladurham

Does dessert literally translate to "after table" or "night table", or is that just my brain being crazy?

January 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Literally, "after table".

("night table" is "Nachttisch" with one -t from "Nacht" and one t- from "Tisch", and is an existing word.)

Presumably from an extension "table" > "meal".

January 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/an3stis

Hmm something about this seems off. In german Nightstand is Nachttisch with two t's while dessert(nachtisch) has one t. Forgive me if i'm wrong but i think the word is composed of Nacht=night + a derivative of the word essen(isch),Nachtisch.

May 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

Nach is after, Tisch is table.

Hence "after table." Or the treat that you eat after sitting at the table for a meal.

May 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/an3stis

Ok, thanks.

May 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

That was a good thought, though, and one that crossed my mind as well. Or rather, I was thinking about a nightstand originally.

When I am not sure about the etymology of some German word, I often think about my native language of Dutch, which is extremely similar very often. "Dessert" in Dutch, aside from also being "dessert", is "nagerecht" (after-course). I was also reminded of the English word "dish" in this context.

July 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MACmuffion

Danke!

August 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cgrunchj

Abendessen translates to "evening eat"! LOL!

April 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

Essen is both a verb meaning "to eat" and a noun meaning "food."

So really it's probably better translated as "evening food."

April 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cgrunchj

Good point Delta1212.

April 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Agreed.

April 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JFSebastian1

i forgot an s from the dessert and i learned that desert is called Wüste in German!

March 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Perseph1955

Teenage Wüste-land!

March 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/viviangreen1

why "a dessert"? would Sie isst Nachtisch be correct also?

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimoneBa

No, in German there needs to be an article in there. In English you could leave it out ("She is eating dessert" is fine), but in German, you can't. You need "einen".

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"Sie isst Nachtisch" is fine where I come from.

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quis_lib_duo

^^ Agree. It's perfectly fine around here, too.

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

So in the areas where it is ok, does it follow a similar pattern to English where "dessert" without the article is the name of the "meal" (for lack of a better term) while with the article is the name of an item you would eat as that meal? Or is that distinction not present?

(Ex: Cake is a dessert. You eat it for dessert.)

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's not quite the same because eating something "for dessert" is, for me, "zum Nachtisch" and not "zu Nachtisch". (But "als Nachtisch", without, article, for "as [today's] dessert" or "as dessert rather than as the main dish".)

"Kuchen ist ein Nachtisch. Man isst ihn zum Nachtisch. Maria isst gerade Nachtisch. Was isst sie zum Nachtisch? Sie isst Kuchen zum Nachtisch. Isst sie den Kuchen als Vorspeise? Nein, sie isst ihn als Nachtisch."

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl

I guess dessert is a "course" or part of the meal.

December 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimoneBa

Oh. In my region, it sounds a bit odd without the article...

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

Ok, to make a it a draw again: in my region this (no article) would sound odd as well (Bavaria here).

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Perseph1955

As a beginner, my head spins with all these regional differences. Still, please keep posting, native speakers. I'll pick up the subtleties in time--I hope!

November 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Klingt nach einem Nord-Süd-Gefälle?

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quis_lib_duo

Scheint so, ja, Niedersachsen hier (als Herkunft).

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

Ja, das hab ich mir auch gedacht.

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexander_Agruso

Can "Nachspeise" also be considered dessert?

May 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes (but note that it's feminine).

May 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexander_Agruso

Got it mate. Thanks.

May 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theSaxy

How would I say, 'She is a dessert' and how would that be taken by native German speakers?

July 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"She is a dessert" would be Sie ist ein Nachtisch. -- no accusative since "to be" takes nominative on both sides.

For feminine or neuter nouns, there would be no difference between nominative and accusative, e.g. Sie isst eine Banane / Sie ist eine Banane; Sie isst ein Dessert / Sie ist ein Dessert.

But even with a masculine noun such as Nachtisch, I think most native German speakers would hear Sie ist ein Nachtisch as Sie isst ein'n Nachtisch, since einen often gets contracted into a single syllable in quick speech..

July 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jwillis50

I'm sure I should've picked this up by now but how can I know whether this refers to "she" or "they"?

April 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

sie isst = she eats

sie essen = they eat

You have to look at the verb conjugation.

April 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m3peran

Why einen? Why not ein?

January 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because "Nachtisch" (like "Tisch") is grammatically masculine (der Tisch, der Nachtisch); the word is the direct object of "isst" and thus should stand in the accusative case; and the masculine accusative form of "ein" is "einen".

"ein" would be masculine nominative, or neuter nominative/accusative.

January 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Faux3

And that lesson, IMO, is why DL used "a dessert" here instead of just "dessert", regardless of regional differences.

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DJFeuerdrache

My gosh I put desert...

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Perseph1955

I learned the spelling difference by remembering that dessert (the sweet) is about excess--hence the extra letter. Desert (the Sahara or Mojave) is sparse--hence the single letter. As for desert (accent on the second syllable, meaning to leave one's post), the "s" in question has already run away. Silly, perhaps, but it helps me. Hope it's the same for other learners!

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

Heh, I learned there was an extra 's' in dessert because you want more of it.

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnMoser1

Why does it accept "Sie ist einen Nachtisch" without complaining about a typo?

July 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

It shouldn't, you're right. Please report it.

July 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr_Gilmore_Jr

I use my mic to put in english instead of typing and when i say dessert, it always comes out "desert" and i get marked red for that.

December 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Perseph1955

Perhaps it is your emphasis. "Dessert" is pronounced (in the US, at least) desSERT. "Desert" is DESert. Does that make a difference?

December 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"desert" as in the verb (when a soldier runs away from his company, or as in "the town was deserted") is also pronounced like "dessert" (the food after a meal).

December 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Perseph1955

You're right, of course. I was trying to help suss out why the mic might not be recognizing certain input. Clearly I wasn't inclusive in my remarks.

December 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ahmad728338

so why not "zu nachtisch" ??

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

zum Nachtisch would be "for dessert", at least for me, e.g. Er isst einen Pudding zum Nachtisch "He eats some pudding for dessert".

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonylawlor

Dessert is the same as a sweet

June 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

I don't think so. A dessert is something you eat at the end of a meal. A sweet you could eat at any time without having a meal before -at least that's the way it would be in German.

June 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria299959

dessert is perfect, but British English calls dessert either pudding or sweet, not to be be confused with the sweets that US English calls candy

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Whether to call it "pudding" or "dessert" in the UK is a class distinction, to some extent - saying that pudding is "the British English word" for it misses the mark.

We used "dessert" in my family, for what it's worth -- "pudding" refers only to, well, pudding (things made with boiled milk), not for example, a piece of cake or some yoghurt.

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeidenElwood

In another lesson from the internet, i was taught about "Nachspeise." Is "Nachtisch" a more common term?

December 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It is where I come from.

Well, depends.

Nachspeise is a bit more "refined" so it might be the word you see on a restaurant menu.

But in a person's home you're probably more likely to hear Nachtisch, in my experience.

YMMV in different parts of Germany.

December 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrystianThiesen

We say "sobremesa" in Brazil (sobre=over, on; mesa=table).

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_Andersson

I first thought about writing "She is eating a night table". :p German is weird sometimes.

November 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Link697180

Is anyone else confused with sie meaning she or they or are?

January 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

"sie" does not mean "are".

January 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Very funny, you know what the person is asking even if it was not perfectly asked.

"sie ist" is "she is "

"sie sind" is "they are "

"sie isst" is "she eats "

"sie essen" is "they eat "

June 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qGr24eaA

I got it wrong for using 'sweet' instead of 'dessert'. What was wrong with that?

March 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It doesn’t work for dessert in American English, but you could report it as an alternative answer for British English. You can include this dictionary reference in your report, scroll down to the noun definition. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sweet

March 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelikaku

"She eats a desert" was not accepted (dessert is misspelled).

"She eats a dessert" was accepted. בס״ד

June 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Typos are only accepted if they don’t make other words.

June 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fred236114

What is the difference between "She eats a dessert" and "She is eating a dessert"? Duo doesn't like the first one.

July 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Try reporting it as also correct.

July 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaughanD

Why wasn't "She eats a dessert" accepted?

September 27, 2019
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