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https://www.duolingo.com/kbogovic

Animal Sounds in Foreign Languages!

kbogovic
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Interesting link to visit and learn how animals talk in foreign countries - good to know that too, right?

http://chapmangamo.tumblr.com/

4 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kristinemc

Good to know! That link is awesome. One of my favorite images in there :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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+Кря! (crya!) in Russian :-)

A great idea! Only, the way people actually pronounce these sounds is not always represented correctly. For example, the Russian for "gulp" is written as "bulk", but it is in fact pronounced as "boolk", not like the English word "bulk". "Coin" in French most likely is read somewhat like "kwa" than like the English word "coin".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hdcanis
hdcanis
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And "kvaak" in Finnish. The actual pronounciation was something I'd want to hear in some of the examples, like "sum" and "boong" for bees, you can say those flatly and they sound like nothing at all but I guess you could also throw in some buzzing tone to them...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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In Russian, kvak (or, rather, kvah) is what frogs say :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larisa_L
Larisa_L
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In Russian bees жужжат - joojjat, which means they pronounce Ж sound which is like letter j in French, or a bit like g in English but without that d sound English speakers add to it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diagramchaser
diagramchaser
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Oh man, "coin" is what ducks actually sound like - a sort of honking noise. I can't comment on most of these because I don't know the pronounciations in most of these languages but ducks really don't sound like "quack" at all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elsentrix
elsentrix
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I showed my kids this song, its hilarious and I know it comes in a few other languages, this one is the german one. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjBCjfB3Hq8

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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baahahahaaa that is the cutest, most hilarious thing ever! xD I'M DYING!!! (omg)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elsentrix
elsentrix
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They have it in Spanish too I think :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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Unfortunately, German GEMA has struck again and the videos in other languages are blocked. :(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elsentrix
elsentrix
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http://www.youtube.com/user/pulcinopiotv Here you go for all the different languages and a few new songs too (about animals dancing different dance styles)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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I found that, but the videos do not work if you access them from Germany, because the German "Society for musical performing and mechanical reproduction rights" blocks them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lilithly
Lilithly
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Das hatte ich schon fast vergessen! xD thanks so much for reminding me of this!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lund.mikkel

Ahh, that explains Nyan Cat!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kortaggio
Kortaggio
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But, what does the fox say?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/makemusic
makemusic
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Haha! I really like this! I had never thought about this before... thanks for the link! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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The German "schlürf" is more like slurp in English. I'd translate "gulp" with "gluck".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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This should definitely be added to the animal section in the tree. Especially if they add the sounds too, it would be particularly interesting. In any case, I can offer a bit of sounds.

In portuguese, a duck (grasna - Quak, a dog (late - huuf), the cat (mia - miaau), a mosquito (zumbiu - zuuuum). Oh by the way people express pain in different ways too. In portuguese, ouch (Aihhh), English (aau).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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This could be fun as an optional lesson, but having to memorize and then practice all those quacks and moos with their spellings won't be interesting for everyone.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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Maybe they could use speech recognition instead, rather than write it down, we make the appropriate sound. That would be fun, and would be bound to make people sound crazy, especially those using their cellphones!!! :)

Edit: Actually, as you become proficient in a language, you need to learn these sooner or later.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/agoosh
agoosh
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I would love to see some onomatopoeia in different lessons throughout the tree (not necessarily one lesson devoted completely to that though)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hdcanis
hdcanis
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A sentence or two for the most common at least: "Les chiens aboyent et les chats miaulent" etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Re: fluency, so true! Japanese has the most onomatopoeia of any language surviving today. People use them regularly in conversation (because, they have sounds for everything, even staring! Jiiiiiiiiiiiii). So, it is imperative to learn onomatopoeia for this language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hdcanis
hdcanis
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Finnish has lots of onomatopoeic verbs describing the sound made by this thing in that situation. Those are a bit easier when you know the grammar and word construction but before that they are probably bit of a challenge especially since many of them are quite hard to put in a dictionary...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hdcanis
hdcanis
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It is true that if you want to be fluent, you'll have to know at least several of these because they will come up.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RorySparshott

I know this is hideously immature of me, but in Mandarin, 'woof' is 'wang'. This has made my day.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/badboybilly

Most ridiculous: in Korean, dogs say "Mang, mang!" Not even close. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bethanybrg

Dominican spanish says "kikiri kikiri kooo" for a rooster's crow. the sound of "cock a doodle doo" to them is hilarious :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liyacount

and kwek in Indonesian :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Goran12
Goran12
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It reminds me when my friends invited their French friends to Czech Republic. The biggest surprise for the French family children was that Czech cockerels do the same sound as the French ones, even thouch it's transcribed as "kykyryký!" in Czech (unlike French "cocorico"). I see they will be even more surprised in English.

4 years ago