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"Deze kandidaat wil ook minister worden."

Translation:This candidate also wants to become a minister.

2 years ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sirnuke
sirnuke
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Is the sentence implying "become a minister," or should "become the minister" also be valid?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/--Charlotte--
--Charlotte--
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In cases like these (professions) we leave out the article, whereas in English you would only leave it out if there is only one of them: she wants to become president, for example. There is only one president, so no need for 'a'. If need be, it can be specified by adding 'of the USA', or something along those lines.

  • Hij wil bakker worden - he wants to be(come) a baker.
  • Ik ben bakker - I am a baker
  • Zij wil minister worden - she wants to be(come) a minister.

The only instance where I can imagine using an article in Dutch is when talking to children. For example:

  • In Amerika zijn er verkiezingen. Veel verschillende mensen willen de president van Amerika worden. De mensen kiezen de beste kandidaat die wordt de president.
  • There are elections in America. Many different people want to become the president of America. The people choose the best candidate and that person will become the president.

Or:

  • "Ik wil een prinses worden!", zei het meisje tegen de goede fee.
  • "I want to be(come) a princess!", said the girl to the fairy godmother.
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sirnuke
sirnuke
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Alright, though my question is whether "This candidate also wants to become the minister" a valid translation or not. It wasn't accepted, and said "This candidate also wants to become a minister."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/--Charlotte--
--Charlotte--
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Well no, since the lack of an article in Dutch implies that they're talking about 'minister' as a general profession, not a specific position. So it's a minister, not the minister.

2 years ago