Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Jag behövde inte lyssna, jag förstod ändå."

Translation:I did not need to listen, I understood anyway.

2 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/israellai
israellai
  • 19
  • 15
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5

Are there rules for commas in Swedish? When do you start a new sentence and when do you not?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roussu
Roussu
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5

I use the comma rules presented in the section "Svenska kommateringsregler" below this article: http://spraktidningen.se/artiklar/2013/09/kommat-som-kom-bort. They are in Swedish, though, so they might not be of any use to you.

Basically, if you remember to use a comma between clauses when a subordinate clause comes before a main clause, you'll be fine. Also, it is easier to read long sentences if you put a comma between two main clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction, e.g. "och" and "men". There are other cases where commas can (or should) be used, but at least in colloquial language use commas are usually omitted. It feels like people are too lazy to use them!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/israellai
israellai
  • 19
  • 15
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5

I totally feel that need! I've read many magazine articles that writes "flowingly" i.e. with hardly any commas. I've kinda gotten used to seeing så as a comma after an om-clause.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bjoholm
bjoholm
  • 21
  • 18
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5

Don't trust the magazine articles. Many native Swedes are really bad at using commas :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roussu
Roussu
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5

I know that native Swedish speakers (who are not necessarily Swedes) are bad at using commas. I've seen it myself. If you had cared to actually read the magazine article in question, it actually addresses this problem because it is about the history of comma use in Swedish language. The compilation of Swedish comma rules below the article is based on the official guidelines by Svenska Akademien.

But that's what rules in this case really are, guidelines. People often can't or don't want to apply them to practical language use, which means that at some point in the future, the official comma rules will be different. Official guidelines are always based on reality, and they change when language use changes.

Anyway, I guess that what both bjoholm and I were trying to say is that Swedish comma rules are nothing to worry about since not even all the native speakers really apply them. It can be, however, useful to use commas when it improves readability. That's what I personally would recommend as an L3 speaker who reads quite a lot of Swedish texts every day and is really pissed about almost nobody using commas, which sometimes makes long sentences really hard to read.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bjoholm
bjoholm
  • 21
  • 18
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5

Stylistic experiments aside, if it's a good writer, he or she will most often use commas in accordance with the guidelines. You'll find that most good Swedish authors do this. However, the quality of writing in newspapers and magazines is notoriously uneven. I'd therefore suggest that you follow the guidelines instead of trying to copy someone else.

I don't think it is a good idea to ignore these rules just because "languages change". It is not just about readability, it has also to do with credibility. As a native Swede, one of the first things I notice when reading a text is whether the writer can write properly. In an opinion piece, for instance, if the writer doesn't use commas correctly, I am instinctively becoming more critical of the text as a whole.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roussu
Roussu
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5

Thank you for replying! I admit that I must have misunderstood what you meant in your first reply.

I agree that there is a reason to worry if professional writers, such as journalists, can't write properly. Languages have "official" rules and guidelines because the commonly shared language variant (in this case högsvenskan) needs to be regulated so that speakers of all the different dialects can understand each other through it. From a Duolingo learner's perspective, though, it might not be relevant to go that deep into grammar rules since most of them are presumably trying to learn colloquial language (I might as well be wrong). In colloquial language use people don't follow the comma guidelines for the most part, so I don't see the need for a beginner to learn them all. However, I think that even language learners should be made aware that by dismissing the comma rules, they can only write informally.

What I was trying to say in my last reply, by writing about language chance etc., is that since people are using, or not using, commas like they are at the moment, it most probably eventually leads to changes in official guidelines. That's what naturally happens to languages when time goes on. What I was not trying to say is that we shouldn't care about guidelines at all. It probably came across like that, anyway, but it wasn't my idea behind it.

In summary, I think that language guidelines are important because speakers of different dialects need a way to communicate with each other. However, it might not be relevant for a language learner at Duolingo level to know all about them.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/israellai
israellai
  • 19
  • 15
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5

Wait, did I just use the s-passive in English? Of course I meant 'that are written'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roussu
Roussu
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5

Oh, I forgot to answer to the other question. In this case, I think that these clauses are considered to be parts of the same sentence because you could add a conjunction (eftersom, för att, för) between them. The language wouldn't really flow if there were a full stop between the clauses.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kris650042

Whoever wrote this statement must have a teenager

3 months ago