1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "Das ist ein Nachtisch."

"Das ist ein Nachtisch."

Translation:That is a dessert.

October 8, 2015

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArvindhMani

Vor (before) + speise = Appetizer

Haupt (main) + gericht = Main course

Nach (after) + tisch = Dessert

Might be a useful tip for learning :)

October 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clownsuits

But wasn't it just a lesson or two previous that we were taught Nachspeise? Even if it wasn't duo, I know I've seen it before. Is Nachtisch more common than Nachspeise?

October 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Egmont

Hauptspeise and Nachspeise are correct too.

Hauptspeise kaj Nachspeise estas ambaux gxustaj.

February 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/izzitty

Nachspeise is more commonly used.

July 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mblakesley

Unfortunately doesn't help too much with Nachtisch because of the full translation: "after table". What does "after table" mean?

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElleLingo

I'd like to start a tally for how many people write "desert" ;-)

October 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandraLenox

Easy way to remember: Dessert has two ss' because it's Super Sweet!

October 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pulverkuss

I like the one: "double s because you want 2" ;)

November 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElleLingo

Or: "the sandy desert" (both have one 's')

October 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deboutwest

I'm having dessert in the desert.

April 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElleLingo

Doesn't help you to remember the spelling though! I like "one coffee, two sugars" for "necessary" as well haha

April 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandraLenox

I like that Nachtisch kind of sounds like "naughty." Like desserts are naughty foods that you should only eat sparingly. :)

October 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

Ah, but "desserts" is "stressed" reversed. Wouldn't it be nice to reverse your stress?

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrakeHyman

I actually wrote "Night table" with extreme confidence thinking I had learned another German compound. Nein!

May 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mvtenorio

The portuguese word for Nachtisch is "sobremesa" which literally means "on the table". It's interesting that the german word has a similar construction.

October 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oscarba07

In spanish "sobremesa" means staying after the meal to make small talk. Like "de sobremesa hablaremos de futbol" (we will talk about footbal after the meal)

October 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lotfysalama

mejor dicho "De sobremesa hablaremos sobre fútbol" =)

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Faux3

Nachttisch means night table/stand... So close and yet (completely?) unrelated (nach{after} vs nacht{night} + table). Vorspiel -- foreplay -- is another close spelling to a word we just learned as meaning appetizer (vorspeise). Coincidence? Or conspiracy to make us sound foolish ("And I'll have no foreplay nor nightstand with my meal; I'm running late.")?

April 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gavin733986

in the North of England the word 'Sweet'is a common substitute for 'Dessert' but was not accepted.

February 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alliejane2853

is there a way to distinguish between Nachtisch and Nachttisch when speaking? I don't want people to think I like to eat nightstands...

June 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieSumpfHexe

i kept writing ''desert'' and wondering what's wrong :D sometimes my brain is just full absent *facepalm

August 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaquelCabez

remembers me of the word natas in portuguese, a traditional dessert here aha

October 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pulverkuss

... just marveling at how "after-table" becomes "dessert"... Language is crazy fascinating sometimes.

November 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

German Tisch and English dish both developed from the same source, Latin discus. Think of Nachtisch as an after-dish, something you eat after the meal, i.e. dessert.

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veronica7991

Why is it "ein Natchtish" and not "einen Nachtisch"?

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clownsuits

"to be" is considered a copulative verb. Basically, you're just defining the subject. Einen would be the direct object case (accusative) but since we are using the verb to define the subject we stay in subject (nominative) case. In general, if something just "is" something (ist not acting as auxiliary verb) it will be in the nominative case. e.g. Er ist ein Hund.

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ken.mc0

I think "sweet" is okay. From the OED:"Sweet = A sweet dish (a pudding, tart, cooked fruit, etc.),forming a separate course at a meal."

April 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RedSwirl

"That is dessert" isn't accepted. I know there's an indefinite article in the German sentence, but the word "dessert" in English doesn't commonly have an article before it.

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreeaNae1

Exactly.

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dream_Browser

Hey! Nice way to remember. Danke ;)

October 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mathias255486

Can Natchtish be used the way treat can in english for instance zum beispiel this is a treat not referring to food. I ask because the english translation this is a dessert instead of this is dessert makes me wonder. Danke.

February 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChineseVase

Das ist ein Wüse! Freeze frame, 90's music. Joke lost in translation

March 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lameckfara

dessert comes from the French word: desservir.

desservir = "to clear the table" (dessert is served after the table has been cleared of other dishes)

Nachtisch = "after table"

April 20, 2018
Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.