"Thanks. You are welcome."

Translation:Danke. Gern geschehen.

3 years ago

128 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NealMcCall1

Danke. Bitte schön.

was deemed incorrect. As I recall when I was initially exposed to German in the 1960's Bitte schön was the standard form for "You are welcome".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remmyvanrijn

This was exactly what I was taught in the 60's, and it's a universally accepted polite reply.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindhMani
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It's accepted now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NerdyJock
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That's what I was taught in the 90s/early 2000s. That or "vielen dank"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
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"Bitte" not accepted April 2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexanderSvan

Still not accepted (Mid-May 2017)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Racine228515

Now accepted in 2018 Nov.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonFlame412

Thats because it means please

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
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It's not quite that simple, DragonFlame412.

Depending on the context, bitte means "please", "of course", "certainly", "go ahead", "by all means", "that's all right", "that's OK", "don't mention it", "not at all", "my pleasure", "you're welcome", "it's all right", "no problem", "there you are", "what did I say?", "didn't I tell you?", "told you so!", "after you", "go ahead", "action!", "request" or "petition".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DiyanaYash1

Thats a lot of meaning there...

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peter_lingo

Oof, gotta join a german class or course

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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Exactly. But that's too many meanings for Duo to tackle. To accept bitte schön is clear, but I think that standing alone in one of Duo's contextless situations please is enough. In context, in real life or in reading, the other meanings become clear.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheDoctorcraft

It doesnt jusy mean please. It also means you're welcome as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jim82162

Bitte has different meanings

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Racine228515

No it means more than one thing dude.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Racine228515

danke

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/minseok263669

Jj9j

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KagetoMits
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Well you are right. "Bitte schön" could be considered slightly more formal than "gern geschehen", but they can be used interchangeably

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/franmau
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Can I say "du bist wilkommen"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Only in the meaning "I bid you welcome (to this place)", not in the meaning, "I appreciate your thanks".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zekecoma

Yeah, you can't say that. You can say "danke", "vielen Dank", "bitte", "keine Ursache", "gern geschehen", etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remmyvanrijn

Also, "ohne weiteres!", which is like "de nada" in Spanish or "But of course!" in English

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lesliewilman
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To a native English speaker, in England, of nearly 80 years, "You're welcome" is still a glaring Americanism, a robotic response from a till operator to a "thank you" or "bye".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandy54630

Well I am an American, but first I am a human being. When I say, "you're welcome", I mean it. My you're welcome means I'm thankful to you for being nice enough to thank me. I am simply being polite and I'm definitely not some mechanic machine responding to another human kindness.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
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As an Irishman resident in England for many years I am obliged to say I hear "You're welcome" in the American sense regularly. No, it is not the usual way of saying it. You might hear "No problem" or "Don't mention it" or "It was a pleasure" or "Not at all" or even the antipodean "No worries!"

"You're welcome" is undoubtedly still regarded as an Americanism by most British people of a certain age, but would certainly not be taken as not genuine by most. It has to be said, though, that for some people it does not lower the temperature to hear it after every encounter with a service provider. I think, because it is driving out the native species (rather like red squirrels and grey (gray!) squirrels, it is meeting with a degree of resentment and irritation.

Small doses, please. Ubiquity is not strength.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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When you spoke about American service providers saying You're Welcome I finally understood. There are several comments throughout Duo by people in the UK discussing You're Welcome as an Americanism and talking about all the other things that are said in the UK. I never quite understood it because, although among the list of alternatives there are generally a few that sound a little British, but for the most part are things I hear every day. As an American going about my daily routine, I don't actually hear You're welcome that often. Certainly among my friends, family, coworkers and even with strangers on the street or in the "shops" it isn't particularly common. No worries is becoming common, but still sounds Australian to me. It started getting popular with Crocodile Dundee. But Any time, not a problem, Of course, My pleasure, Happy to help are actually said much more frequently. But You're welcome still has the stamp of formal graciousness. I know that when I am in a business capacity and being formal I generally respond to thanks with You are most welcome. So when you spoke about service providers it makes sense. A good portion of the Americans you meet are either in their professional capacity or hopefully trying to be on their best behavior as Foreigners in your country. I don't necessarily consider myself an expert on the differences between American and British English, but I had never heard that You're welcome was American before. I did live in England when I was a teenager for a year, but, as I say, hearing all the other responses would not have seemed unusual. But with American stereotypes about the British formality, I wouldn't be surprised if Americans were more likely to say you're welcome as the safe formal bet.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandy54630

I am from Kentucky originally and now live in South Carolina. It is considered rude if someone thanks you and you don't say you're welcome. In South Carolina, yes ma'am, yes sir, no ma'am no sir, are also a must, if you want to be considered respectful.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Geralt-Mao

Nein

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BampaOwl
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So does "Gern" on its own also mean "You're welcome!"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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That would sound odd to me, but "Gerne." might work.

Normally, "gern" and "gerne" are pretty much interchangeable, but "Gerne geschehen." and "Gern." both sound wrong.

The most common version, though, would be "Gern geschehen." (or "Bitte schön." or "Keine Ursache." or "Nichts zu danken.").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Curtis27
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Someone may correct me if I am wrong, but I believe "Gern" is similar to "with pleasure". This was told me by a native English speaker friend who lived in Germany for several years.

eg. "Ich Koche und Esse Gern" = "I like to cook and eat" or "I cook and eat with pleasure".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katja-z
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Gern = with pleasure (adverb: gladly, with pleasure, willingly, surely)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gothicapplegoat

I answered with the formal version of you "danke. Sie sind willkommen" and got it wrong, should this have been accepted or did I make a mistake?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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By itself, "You are welcome" is ambiguous between "I am glad that you have arrived here" and "I acknowledge your thanks".

But in the context of "Thanks" immediately before it, I think only the second interpretation makes sense, but "Du bist/ihr seid/Sie sind willkommen" can only mean the first one (welcoming someone to a place, not replying to thanks).

I think Duo was correct to reject it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/historicbruno

It makes no less sense than saying "you're welcome" immediately after thanking someone. I have never heard someone do that. However, I can imagine many scenarios where you thank someone before welcoming them, such as a good friend on the doorstep having just complimented how lovely your yard looks. You thank them, then welcome them into your home. Or someone brings a gift to your party, you thank them, then welcome them.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/viva_Duo

it must be a dialogue, obfuscated by improper punctuation, ie. it would make sense as:

  • Thanks
  • You are welcome
3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/viva_Duo

Well, this is not helping (on mobile app). Duo erased dashes introducing direct speech. Let's try differently.

A: Thanks.

B: You are welcome.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/texasmochi

I think, while Willkommen does mean "welcome" - it is the greeting kind of welcome (like welcome to my home).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mayslina

Can I only say Gern insted of Gern geschehen in informal language?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hragJawich

Gerne would be better

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SyamkumarR
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Why 'Ihr seid willkommen' is marked wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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That German phrase is used when welcoming someone to your house or to a place, but not as a response to thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pfahr0
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Can one use Mach dir keine Sorgen in lieu of you're welcome?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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In my opinion, no. It would be like responding to thanks with "Don't be worried."

If you're looking for something along the lines of "No worries" in reply to "thanks", then "Kein Problem" (no problem) or "Keine Ursache" (no cause) can work.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VictorShi1

Why does Gern have a capital G,its not a noun is it?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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It's capitalised because it's at the beginning of a sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReganBarr

It marked "du bist willkommen" as correct. Should it not have been..?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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I think it should not have been accepted in the context of a "Bitte" immediately before it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nathanielsims

Is saying: Danke Gern: informal and Danke gern geschenen formal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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gern geschehen is a fixed phrase used when responding to thanks - the danke is not part of it.

Danke gern by itself makes no sense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loganpro101

Why couldnt it be du sind wilkomen

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Because sind is for wir (we), sie (they), and Sie (formal you).

du needs the form bist.

But even du bist willkommen will not work, I think, because it doesn't translate the meaning, which is a conventional reply to thanks; in German, we don't reply to thanks with such an expression.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kahnor

Why is "Danke, gern geschenen" almost correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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geschenen with -n- (N) should be geschehen with -h- (H).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kahnor

Oh I see. Thanks a bunch!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaydaHowar1

I answered with " Danke. Bitte ja." and it didn't take it. I took a class in high school that said that was an acceptable answer. Is it?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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No. "Bitte ja" is not a reply to thanks.

"Ja bitte" can be used for "yes, please", and "Bitte" on its own can be a reply to thanks, but "Bitte ja" means, at best, something like "Please do" in response to a question like "Shall I do X or not?".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John830018

In this case, why is welcome not willkommen

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Because you're not telling someone that you are happy that they have come to a place; instead, you're giving a conventional reply to someone who thank you. And German doesn't use willkommen as a conventional reply to thanks.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
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"Gern geschehen" literally means something close to "Gladly done." In Dutch, they say the same thing: "Graag gedaan." The closest we might get in English to something we actually use for "You're welcome" would be "It was my pleasure."

(Sometimes I find it helpful to look into literal translations of fixed phrases. I am reasonably confident we will encounter other uses of the verb geschehen in later lessons.)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikesVR07

Just to get to know. What will be the differences between "Bitte schön" and "Gern geschehen"?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Nothing really.

They are both conventional responses to thanks.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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I don't think there really is much. Bitte schön seems more the automatic response. That may make gern gesehen more formal, but not much if so.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeyran6

Why bitte is incorrect?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aditya184256

Danke,willkommen...is this right for above given phrase

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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No.

We don't use Willkommen as a response to thanks in German.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielODon19
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I thought welcome was Willkommen.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Willkommen! is "welcome!" in the sense of "I'm glad that you have come to this place; please feel at home; you are a guest whom we like to see".

But here, the phrase is "you're welcome" as a reply to "thank you", not as a phrase for someone coming into your home. Completely different context, and German uses a different expression here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregNelson15

I agree, but why is it saying the correct response is " Du bist willkommen."?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sravanthi660080

Confused about this sentence?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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It is not one sentence -- it is two sentences, from different speakers.

The first person says, "Thanks!"

The other person replies, "You're welcome!", which is a conventional reply to thanks. (Some people say, "Don't mention it!" or "It's a pleasure!" instead in this situation in English.)

In German, the second sentence is similarly a conventional reply to thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregNelson15

Also, it is claiming that "Danke." is not OK and "Danke schön" is required. My sense was that the English informal "Thanks" is more comparable to "Danke" and the English formal "Thank you" is more comparable to "Danke schön". Nicht war?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyCoogan1

I would typically say Macht nichts But this too was rejected

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supremo11

You can say "Immer gerne" as well

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gaynor516252

Haven't learned from Duo how to pronounce geschehen. I keep thinking Gern geschehen is actually willkommen and keep getting it wrong. What is the difference?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gaynor516252

As welcome has more than one meaning, it is said differently in other languages like German. Welcoming someone into your house is not the same as welcoming someone to your assistance.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nettie787573

What is the difference between sind and seid?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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sind is used when the subject is wir (we) or sie (they) -- and also for plural nouns.

seid is used when the subject is ihr (you - when speaking to several people).

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Serena64413

Why is it wrong saying....hallo, willkommen?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Because hallo does not mean "thanks", and willkommen is not what we say in response to thanks -- it's only used to welcome someone to a place.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdevola
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Wilkommen in this case is definitely wrong, but bitte should be accepted. This is what I was taught as well.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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"bitte" is accepted as a translation of the second sentence.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lee1221

huh? Thanks, you're welcome is Danke Gern geschehen? I thought it was Danke, Du bist willkommen

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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No. "Du bist willkommen" might be used when someone arrives at your house, but it's not a response to thanks.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rita625423

I am not 'getting' what causes the different use for welcome with geschenhen or willkommen???

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Willkommen! is used as a greeting to tell someone that you are happy to have them as a guest in your place.

Gern geschehen! is used as a reply to thanks.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Claire907018

Why not Danke. Willkommen. ???

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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See the other comments. This has been asked and answered before

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jhongil15

So if someone thanks me I could reply with "bitte" and it would mean "you're welcome"?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Pretty much, yes.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeremyLall2

Isn't The meaning Gern "to like something"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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No, not on its own.

Many sentences with gern in them will translate into sentences with "like" in them, but not this expression.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel615469

Bitte schon is also correct

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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No, it's not -- bitte schon ("please, already") is not correct.

bitte schön is an accepted alternative, however.

(The dots make a difference. If you can't type schön, then write schoen. But schon is a different word.)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Korah18

I was taught "willkommen" was an appropriate response to danke

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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I recommend that you try to unlearn that.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anand120936

Correct pronounciation for 'Gern'??

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreas727715

Vielen Dank. Bitte schön.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KateusandB

Danke bitte shon. should be marked correct. Bcs it is correct. Just sayin'

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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Except that you misspelled schön. Besides the c, you need to include an e if you can't add the umlaut: schon. That's how it was done before so many people had such easy access to international diacritic marks.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/akulgoyal1

Shouldn't this be "Danke. Du bist wilkommen"? I thought "Gern geschehen" translates to "my pleasure".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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You are translating literally not culturally. Willkommen is used to welcome someone into your home, event, country, etc. It is not what you say in response to thank you or anything like when we say you are welcome. It has been a LONG time since I was in Germany, but what I heard more often for you're welcome is bitte schön. I don't know whether that was regional, old fashioned or if Duo just thinks it is too confusing since Bitte is please. So yes gern geschehen means something like my pleasure. Geschehen means to happen so it's more like happy it happened or something. But this is a common for common translation. In English the default response to thank you is you're welcome. I would have put bitte schön before gern geschehen, but the bottom line is the word willkommen won't be in the mix.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Gern geschehen is a response to thanks, much like "My pleasure; don't mention it; you're welcome" and a number of other phrases. In that sense, it translates to any or all of them.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelique8023
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WTF . ONLY 'Danke. Gern' is correct?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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By no means. There are 72 accepted translations.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandy54630

I would like to be able to go back and correct my spelling.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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You should be able to do so. You just have to do so before submit it. It's just that people tend to enter their answer too fast and they don't proofread BEFORE they click check.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandy54630

I just don't know how to spell some of the bigger words at the first attempt. When I misspell them and get the answer wrong I would like to look at the correct spelling and correct my wrong spelling.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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That is important. But I do suggest that you use external resources even if it is a pen and a notebook to copy the words or sentences that give you problems. The good news is that, although it takes a minute to remember to put in all the consonants, German is actually quite a phonetic language and learning the spelling isn't hard as it is quite consistent.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandy54630

Yes, I'm finding that out about the spelling being pretty phonetic once you learn how to pronounce the words the correct way.I am usually in bed and just don't have paper and pencil around, but I will make a better attempt at those words that give me problems.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric765151

My response was "Danke. ihr seid wilkommen" as in "thanks, you are welcome." am I wrong? you (ihr) are (seid) welcome (wilkommen)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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German doesn't use the word willkommen in that way. You say willkommen to welcome someone to your place, be it house, office, or whatever. But you don't say it in response to thank you. You either say Bitte/bitte schön or Gern geschehen. These little oddities are what make learning set expressions so important.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandy54630

Thank you I knew that it was just something I'm not practicing and I forgot.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric765151

Danke! I really appreciate the response. I guess that makes sense, being that it hardly makes sense in English aha

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cristina287107

I have never heard a German say this

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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Are you talking about just Gern geschehen or about putting it together with Danke. I assume you've heard Danke. I have heard it, but not often. It is somewhat more of a formal response, I think. Here is a discussion of its use. https://dict.leo.org/forum/viewGeneraldiscussion.php?idforum=4&idThread=1135792&lp=ende

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Makayla158953

That is wrong Gern geschehen is "my pleasure"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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Neither you are welcome nor my pleasure is the literal translation of gern geschehen. In fact there isn't really a sensible literal translation of it. Word Refernce translates it as No problem or any time. Those or really not more literal, but they may better reflect the situational level of formality. I am not sure. I don't remember hearing gern geschehen much when I lived in Bavaria, so I am not sure of its social context in terms of formality. But since gern has to do with being happy or enjoying doing something and geschehen has to do with happening/occurring/being done, etc., Glad to do it would be another translation. None of these are more correct than another. These are set expressions that are repeated in set situations almost like rituals. So you translate what is said in one language in that situation with an appropriate similar set expression in English. You're welcome has sort of been the default here, but today I think some of the others are more common.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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There are a variety of expressions that English speakers use to respond to thanks.

"My pleasure" is one of them but not the only one.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sparkyrahamster
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What exactly does gern and geschehen mean?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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There's no English word that fits exactly, I think, especially since the word has more than one usage.

"happily, gladly, voluntarily, with pleasure" sometimes come close.

Sometimes a translation with "like (doing something)" is best.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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They both are words that don't Word Reference defines Gern as meaning gladly, willingly or quickly. It's most common usage is to say essentially that you like to do something Ich schwimme gern (I like to swim). But in this usage gladly is a good translation.

http://www.wordreference.com/deen/gern

Geschehen, as you may have guessed, is a verb, although it is used in several idioms and proverbs in somewhat unusual ways. It essentially has the meaning of happen or occur, though it can also imply done, as in it happened through human efforts. The line in the Lord's Prayer, Thy Will be done, is Dein Wille geschehe. Word Reference translated Geschehen ist geschehen as No use crying over spilled milk, but I always translated it as (What's) done is done. I guess Duo didn't invent this game of translating one idiom/proverb with another.

http://www.wordreference.com/deen/Geschehen

So I would say the most appropriate literal translation here would be gladly done.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gwaugle

Kein Problem now works as well. Just a heads up.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash620408

Thought this was Willkomen?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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No.

Please see the many, many comments on this topic on this page.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
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Willkommen is the welcome you see at the airport welcoming people to the city. English is the only language I know that uses that same word as a response to someone thanking them. In German there are a couple of common responses. Gern geschehen is one, although Bitte schön or simply Bitte are probably the most common.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaBarsaly
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Danke. Willkommen Must be accepted .

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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No.

Willkommen is not used as a response to thanks, while the English "You are welcome" is (in my experience) overwhelmingly used only in this situation.

In the cases where German would use Willkommen, English would use just "Welcome" (or "Welcome to XYZ" or "I bid you welcome" or the like) - not "You are welcome".

2 years ago
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