"Sie kommt aus Deutschland."

Translation:She comes from Germany.

October 8, 2015

148 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/derpkins

How would we differentiate between "She COMES from Germany" as in she was born there, as opposed to "She IS COMING from Germany" as in she is in Germany but will be here soon?

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

Just use the little word "gerade" for the latter meaning - we use it a lot to express what English expresses with continuous tenses.

February 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sally410

Apologies if someone else has already asked (I read a long way down the page), but please would you give the sentence position of "gerade". Thank you.

March 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reject86

Can someone please confirm / clarify this? How DO we differentiate between "she comes from Germany" versus "she is coming from Germany (soon)".

biertopf's comment strikes me as uncertain -his use of "the little word" makes me wonder if he picked that up from somewhere or if he actually knows "gerade" to be the proper word to use.

June 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

I'm a German native speaker. I don't really know why you doubt what I wrote...
If you want to express that a person is from germany (i.e. born there): "Sie kommt aus Deutschland."
If you want to express that a person is arriving from Germany (meaning she was in Germany before she came): "Sie kommt gerade aus Deutschland."

What I don't get is your "soon" - are you talking about future??

June 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reject86

I apologize, the phrase you used sounded odd to me in this context.

I was hoping to get an answer like the sentences you provided as examples. I would have guessed "Sie gerade aus Deutschland" to mean "She is coming from Germany", and I would have been wrong.

Thank you for clarifying (yes, by "soon" I meant future)

June 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreRhineDavis

"gerade" means "just" or "just now" or "right now".

"Sie kommt aus Deutschland" = she comes from Germany

"Sie kommt gerade aus Deutschland" = she is coming from Germany right now

"Ich esse" = I eat / I am eating. (could be just in general).

"Ich esse gerade" = I'm eating right now

"Ich habe gegessen" = I ate / I was eating / I have eaten

"Ich habe gerade gegessen" = I was just now eating / I have just eaten

[not a native speaker, but this is what I have gathered]

April 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karen.craz

Thanks now i understand it better

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ISNOBattle

What does gerade translate to? What does it mean by itself

April 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dorian17365

She comes - sie komt They come - sie kommen

October 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuliaLynch7

Thank you for your help! I see!

April 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean847199

This is what I was looking for. Is there a reason Sie = they when a word ends in 'en'? And Sie = she when it ends in 't'?

April 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

sie "she" (almost always) uses verb forms ending in -t: sie hat, sie trinkt, sie kommt, .... Some exceptions: sie will, sie weiß, sie wird, sie muss, sie kann, sie darf (no ending -- like how English "she will, she must, she can" have no -s ending).

sie "they" (almost always) uses verb forms ending in -en: sie haben, sie trinken, sie kommen, .... Some exceptions: sie sind (irregular), sie ändern, sie handeln, ... (no -en after -er or -el, just -n).

The two sie words sound the same but they have different meanings and they require different verb forms.

That's how German works. I'm not sure what kind of "reason" you're looking for.

May 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vignesh2508

It was mentioned somewhere in the DUO website that there is no distinction between "she comes from germany" and "she is coming from germany" in German.

May 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dunk999

The only way to do so is through context.

May 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fatih195

"They come from Germany" is this wrong?

October 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

Yes. It is "Sie kommt, 3rd person singular conjugation. "They come" would be "Sie kommen", 3rd person plural conjugation.

October 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathermh

Thank you. I was wondering why Sie meant she as well as they, but they come was wrong. I guess its the verb that anchors the context.

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Okei12

Thanks so kindly for this clarification here, I always wondered when to use kommt, komme, kommen

May 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RebeccaHyde1

Im not really sure how we can tell but i would think it was correct

December 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

It is wrong, see my comment from 1 year ago!

December 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RFAzhar

How do we know between she and they ?

October 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

Sie kommt = she
Sie kommen = they (or formal "you")

October 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RFAzhar

Ooh i almost forget that, thank you

November 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jclampitt

How do u know the difference between "she comes" and "they come?"

February 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

From the different conjugation: sie kommt, sie kommen.

February 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Betajoy

She come from Germany is wrong I guess? really.

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

Yes, 3rd pers. singular conjugation in English has an "s" at the end -> she comes.

November 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trey58201

To be fair it's wrong in English as well

December 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacobAntio

How do you know what tense the sentence is in?

December 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

For recognizing the tense you always have to look at the verb. Here it's "kommt", present tense conjugation. I mean, that's the same in English and other languages.

December 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Okei12

Does the verb 'komme' has paste tense?

May 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

Of course:

  • ich kam
  • du kamst
  • er/sie/es kam
  • wir kamen
  • ihr kamt
  • sie/Sie kamen

(Pretäritum)

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinhChiFm

She can be used as "She" or "They" so how am I to differentiate this?

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

You can see it from the verb's conjugation: "sie kommt" vs. "sie kommen". Please read the other comments.

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kingkaiser18

Ah, so you can tell if it's "She" or "They" by looking at the word that comes after. Sie/They is kommen and Sie/she is kommt

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That's right.

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emily.veig

What is the difference btwn Deutschland and Deutschlands?

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

"Deutschlands" is genitive. Example: Die Einwohner Deutschlands heißen Deutsche. (The inhabitants of Germany are called Germans).

October 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Serenading2

I'm still confused with the meaning of sie. Is it they or she? Very confused, help?

November 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

It's both. "sie" can mean "she" or "they". You can tell the difference by the conjugated verb, as the conjugation for "she" (3rd person singular feminine) is different from "they" (3rd person plural): sie kommt (she comes) vs. sie kommen (they come).

To make it even more complicated, there's also "Sie" with capital "S". It is the polite "you"/"you all", i.e. singular and plural. The conjugation is the same as for "sie" meaning "they". "Sie kommen" means "you come". So if the "Sie" is at the beginning of a sentence, you can't tell if it means "they" or polite "you". But you still have context to deduce this.
I hope I could make it clear and didn't confuse you even more. If you still have questions, feel free to ask.

November 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Serenading2

Thank you!

November 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NotquiteLe

Sie is she, hopefully...

November 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

Not only...

November 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RebeccaHyde1

It can mean both; I get confused all the time !!!!!!!

December 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NotquiteLe

"She's coming from Germany" worked for me :D

November 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cinema007

but sie can be also she and they right?

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

Here it can only be "she", as the conjugation "kommt" is 3rd person singular. For "they" it would be "sie kommen".
There's one more thing. "Sie" with capital "S" is the polite "you"/"you all", therefore "Sie kommen..." can also mean "You come...".

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MalihaRahm1

Could you please tell me what will be the form of "KOMMT" when we use Du and Ihr??

May 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

du kommst
ihr kommt

May 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvieLockerbie

the definition says that its right but the answer is incorrect she is coming out of germany. :@@@@

July 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noah551593

When can you tell if Sie is proper or female if Sie can also be the female version.

August 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

Here "Sie" can only mean "She", as the verb has the 3rd person singular conjugation "kommt".
"Sie kommen" (3rd pers. plural conjugation) could mean "They come" or "You [formal] come".

August 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mahesh255797

Why isn't it They come from Germany?

November 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

See my answer to Josie641205's question just above your post (and other comments).

November 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leeler-Gibbs

It is hard to tell apart, SHE, from, THEY, because they are both spelled the same. So guess what, I got it wrong!

December 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

If you look at the conjugated verb, it's easy to tell apart (sie kommt, sie kommen), see other comments.

December 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeaneMHA

It appears that German conversation is about context, so if you are speaking and you say "she comes from Germany," you would not know if she was born there without either asking for clarification, or the speaker said "Sie wurde in Deutchland geboren." Which is "born in," versus "comes from." How do you know the difference in English? Different vocabulary, different verb tense. For right now, though, "she comes from Germany." If you want to know more, you can have a conversation, engage, and ask the speaker for more details. Just my take on it but I too am learning.

February 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyWisnie

Why is Germany called Deutschland

January 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikUniver

The literal translation is "German land".

January 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmlynBro

I thought Sie-t at the end of verbs, so like Ich heiße, Du heißt, Er heißt,Wir heißen,Ihr heißt,Sie heißEN, so why is the question Sie kommT aus Deutschland. Is it because sie as in she and sie as in they have different endings?

September 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Is it because sie as in she and sie as in they have different endings?

Exactly.

sie as in "she" has the same endings as er (he) and es (it) -- er kommt, sie kommt, es kommt "he comes, she comes, it comes".

September 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CalebGeorgeKurth

How come "sie" Has the definition "them"????????????????????????????????????

February 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

"sie" can mean different things:

  • she
  • you (formal you, "Sie" with uppercase 'S')
  • they
  • them
February 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Josie641205

Isn't "Sie" she AND they

October 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

It is, but the verb "kommt" has 3rd person singular conjugation, so it means "she", not "they". For "they" it would be "sie kommen" (3rd pers. plural conj.).

October 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chandler11489

It is really starting to aggravate me that Duolingo won't give me any kind of clue as to if it is "she" or "they".

November 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

You can see if it is "she" or "they" if you look at the conjugated verb. Please read the other comments, it already has been explained.

November 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IzzIqbal

This 'sie' always get me lol. Forgot it would be 'kommen' for 'they'(sie)

December 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zs7raXnS

Can this also mean "You (formal) come from Germany." ?

July 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No -- wrong verb ending.

"you (formal)" has the same verb endings as "they" (usually -en in the present tense), not as "she" (usually -t in the present tense).

July 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brennan807792

is there a difference between kommt aus and kommet aus am i supposed to use them in different scenarios also why can this not also mean they come from germany

July 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonantzin28

How do you know if it sie as they or she?

August 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

If it's the subject, you can tell by the verb ending -- sie kommen has to be "they come" because of the -en ending, while sie kommt has to be "she comes" because of the -t ending. (In the present tense.)

If it's the object, then you usually can't tell the difference between "them" and "her", except by context.

August 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devanme

Wouldnt the litteral translation be "she came out of germany"?

September 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No - "came" is past tense but kommt is present tense.

So a literal translation would be "She comes out-of Germany".

September 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nishant225440

When to use sie as they and sie as she

October 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

When it's the subject, you can tell by the verb ending. See the other comments on this page -- this question has been asked and answered multiple times already.

October 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TylerVenz1

Sie in german is you but you use it when addressing someone kindly.

November 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

... or "they" or "she" or "her".

November 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kingkaiser18

Can't tell between "She is from" and "They are from" im this sentence.Is this one of those sentences you only understand in context?

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    "She is from..." = Sie kommt aus...
    "They are from..." = Sie kommen aus...

    November 2, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karen.craz

    THANK YOU!!! lol i was very confused

    January 27, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shakybill

    Why is this not "They came to Berlin" ?

    December 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    How do you get "They came to Berlin" out of Sie kommt aus Deutschland ?

    That sentence says nothing about Berlin or about "to".

    Also, sie kommt means "she comes" (third person singular, present tense), not "they came" (third person plural, past tense) which would have been sie kamen.

    December 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamMac284514

    Sie is normally they and not she as this is normally sie for she

    January 14, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Are you referring to the capitalisation to distinguish the two?

    Then that's not correct.

    "she" and "they" are both sie, lowercase.

    But since the first word of a sentence is capitalised (in German as in English), they will both look like Sie when they are the first word of a sentence.

    In the middle of a sentence, Sie can be neither "she" nor "they"; it will be the polite "you".

    January 14, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenFrie9

    Cant this also mean "they come from germany"? How can i tell if it is she or they?

    February 23, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    You can tell by the verb endings:

    • sie kommt with -t: she comes
    • sie kommen with -en: they come

    Similarly with sie trinkt/sie trinken; sie isst/sie essen; sie heißt/sie heißen etc. etc. -- the "she" form almost always ends in -t, the "they" form almost always in -en.

    A notable exception is the verb "to be", which is sie ist / sie sind.

    February 23, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

    It can't, the conjugation "kommt" is 3rd person singular (er/sie/es). For "they" it would be "Sie kommen..."

    February 23, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tontonzark

    Sie kommen aus Deutschland means as well: you (polite forme) come from... They come from...

    March 21, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rakhimakha

    What does sie mean ? They or she and when do j kmow the difference!!??

    March 23, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    sie as a subject can mean "they" or "she", and you can tell the difference from the verb ending -- "they" verbs usually end in -en and "she" verbs usually in -t.

    March 23, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Merpingtonpoo

    While studying German at school my teachers told me it was always "nach" when talking about countries or cities. Is this correct, could someone clarify?

    April 25, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    In the sense of "to", I believe that's true for all cities.

    For countries, it's true for most countries whose names are neuter and which are used without an article, e.g. nach Frankreich "to France".

    For countries with other genders (masculine, feminine, or plural), it's usually in, e.g. in die Schweiz, in den Sudan, in die Vereinigten Staaten.

    For country names that are islands, auf ("onto") may be the correct one, e.g. auf die Malediven "to the Maldives".


    In this sentence, of course, you're not coming to Germany but from Germany, and here aus is correct rather than nach

    April 25, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xenodochy

    The fast vocalization skips the first word!

    October 12, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/james790488

    How do you know if its she or they

    October 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Look at the verb.

    • sie kommt “she is coming”
    • sie kommen “they are coming”
    October 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karen.craz

    I have a question how do i know if SIE is "they" or "she" in a sentence

    January 27, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Look at the verb: "she" verbs will end in -t and "they" verbs in -en.

    January 27, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SriramSund7

    is sie means she ? by the way its given Sie which means "you" right ?

    February 7, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    sie can mean "she" or "they".

    As in English, the first letter of a sentence is capitalised in German.

    So sie appears as Sie in this sentence, because it is the very first word.

    February 7, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keijonai

    So how do i know that they are using sie to say "she" and not "they"

    February 8, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Please read all the comments on this page; this has been asked and answered many times already.

    February 9, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tugberk_

    Why doesn't "You are from Germany" get accepted as Sie in the sentence can indicate formal you, too. It is capitalized, being at the beginning of the sentence... So...

    February 27, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    The verb form isn't right for that.

    sie kommt = she comes

    sie kommen = they come

    Sie kommen = you come

    The polite Sie always has the same verb form as sie "they", which almost always ends in -en.

    February 27, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tugberk_

    oh i didn't know that! thank you so much

    March 4, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ali.b.1998

    Why not "she is coming from Germany"?

    March 4, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thoreau18

    How do you know if "sie" means she or they?

    April 6, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Look at the verb.

    Does it end in -t? sie means "she".

    Does it end in -en? sie means "they".

    April 6, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uri9003

    How do I know when is she is from and she comes from ??

    June 23, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe.Stone

    Can someone help me and explain why this is 'Sie kommt' instead of ' Sie kommst'? Wouldn't 'Sie kommt' be they come?

    July 12, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Can someone help me and explain why this is 'Sie kommt' instead of ' Sie kommst'?

    Because -st is for du.

    Wouldn't 'Sie kommt' be they come?

    No; "they" verb forms end in -en: "they come" = sie kommen

    July 12, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stuartr1

    Why not "It comes from Germany"?

    October 13, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

    "sie" = "she", not "it" (it = es).

    October 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fatih195

    It = es

    October 18, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kongbengtsen

    Sie with a big S is they and sie with a small s is she/her i dont know how that is incorrect.

    November 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

    That's wrong.

    • 'sie' is 'she' or 'they' (from the conjugated verb you'll know which one it is, as the conjugation is different: 'sie kommt' = 'she comes', 'sie kommen' = 'they come'.
    • 'Sie' is 'you' (polite/formal)
    • 'sie' can also mean 'her', but this will be clear from context
    November 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo678987

    The sie meaning they AND she is confusing!!

    December 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

    It is, but you can see from the conjugation "kommt" that it means 'she'. For 'they' it would be "sie kommen"

    December 15, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiNiBear1

    How do you differenciate from "she" to "they"? What clues in the sentence tell me which is which?

    March 1, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

    Look at my other comment you already commented. You'll see from the verb form (i.e. from the conjugation of the verb) if the "sie" means "she" or "they".

    March 2, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bgwmson

    Duestchland spelling wron and got the entire sentence wrong?

    November 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielleJo527528

    I was off by one letter ._.

    March 27, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CynthiaUkawu

    I put "she came from Germany" but it crossed out the 'came' part and replaced it with 'comes' is there really a difference b/t the two...

    October 21, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

    Of course. One is present tense and the other one is past tense.

    October 22, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CynthiaUkawu

    sounds interchangeable to me. I came from America, I come from America: means exactly the same thing in my perspective.

    October 22, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glinchey

    biertopf is correct that these are two tenses. Coming from would mean that someone is travelling from that location, i.e. that they are still in the travelling process and not at the destination.

    In your example, "I came from America" is past tense and means I travelled from America (this person doesn't have to be an American to say this) and am now at my destination, however "I come from America" means I am from the US, i.e. I am an American/American citizen. They have very different implications.

    October 23, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyroneWilson42

    Whats the diff. From she and they in German again. I might just be dumb

    May 2, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

    Both is "sie", but the conjugation of the verb is different.

    May 6, 2016
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