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"Chi legge?"

Translation:Who reads?

November 10, 2013

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouMimzy

Everyone using this program


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick328825

Tutti quelli che usano questo programma


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harrison_M

Remember that sentence from an earlier topic. Brilliant. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/urnotjohn

That was a phrase in a past topic. ICONIC.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Albrechtion

Educated people. That's who reads, Duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nt.dekruijff

The monkey does. Not the turtle though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna547783

This is my favorite comment so far


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gardenhoser

How do I know when to use "gg" as a soft or hard sound?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crystalissima

I have noticed one main thing, and that is that the letters 'e' and 'i' tend to change consonant sounds.

When g is in front of e or i, such as 'giornale' and 'legge' the g sounds like 'j' as in john. When in front of a, o, or u, such as 'gatto', 'leggo', or 'gusto' the g sounds like g as in game or go.

E and I also affect the pronounciation of 'c' (changing the 'c as in cat' sound into 'ch as in change'), and sc (turning the 'sc as in scratch' sound into 'sh as in shout').

But when you put an 'h' in front of the vowel, it makes the letter keep its sound. Such as 'bianca' becoming plural into 'bianche' -- the h lets you know that instead of the 'ch' sound you would have from ce, you are to keep using the 'c' sound like in the singular 'bianca'. This is also true with ghi (though i havent seen schi yet so i dont know if that one exists).

Hope that makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raf241

Wow, that was revealing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpiderKarita

When a c is before a u or o use it as a 'k' and when it's before e or i, use it as a soft sound :) however, when there is a h between c and e/i it is pronounced as k, hope that helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vulture63

when is it CHE and when CHI ?, any help appreciated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

Chi = 'who'; che (cosa) = 'what'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scraff

At first i put "Chi Leggi" (it was on the listening exercise). It was marked wrong. Anyone know why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Momo.Reza

We use ki in persian too, i sometimes wonder :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllieWright2

Everyone on Duolingo. -_-


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacee396975

You Read is leggi I read leggo thats is the read


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KSmitch

Why "who reads" as opposed to "why read?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viaggiatore

"chi" means "who", not "why".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KSmitch

Perhaps I'm imagining things then, but I could've sworn I'd come across something that suggested chi could be who and why. Given I'm such a novice it seems easy to believe I'm mistaken. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viaggiatore

"why" is "perché". Seldom anything else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KSmitch

Ok. Far as I'm concerned this means one thing. More practice. Thanks. Big help. I've done well at getting this far, but asking questions has been way harder for me to grasp... for whatever reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crystalissima

I am the same way! It's as if all the question words are so similar. Like quando and quale and quanti, i dont have any real way to remember them yet. Other than quanti, which sounds like quantity, which helps me remember 'how many'. Otherwise, this is my first real speedbump so far.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/o.borsikova

same here! i have already run out of hearts for five times in this question lesson :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anibal-jose-19

How dou you say, What do you read?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/u6c00

Do you always use the he/she/it with a question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JolaDzoku

I think you use he/she/it with a 'who' question. That would make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pablo-Enzo

Perhaps 'Who is (he|she) reading'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m1c45

would this be asking who has the ability to read, who would want to read, or either one depending context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoaheCamilla

if you want to ask who as the ability to read you should say "Chi sa leggere?" (who can read?), if you want to ask who would want to read you say "Chi vuole leggere?" (who wants to read?).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoaheCamilla

In this case you're asking who usually reads as an hobby, i mean like reading books. I dont know if you got it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OptimistInChief

How do you say "who are you reading?" As in, what author wrote what you are reading?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoaheCamilla

"Che autore stai leggendo?" (who are you reading) but its not really right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lithill

What would "who is reading?" be in Italian? Chi leggiano?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BampaOwl

No. Italian tenses are different. In English we have the present continuous ("Who is reading") and the simple present ("Who reads"). OK, there is a difference, but not a lot. Italian just has the one present tense which covers both the English ones. "Chi leggiano?" sounds to me like saying "Who read?" in English. Not good grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lithill

Thank you! That helps a lot. Have a lingot :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BampaOwl

Thanks! Come to think of it, "Who read" pronounced "Hoo Red", is past tense and OK. But pronounced "Hoo reed" it would be wrong! Italian is a lot easier than English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoaheCamilla

What? Italian is a lot more difficult than English!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meike31894

oh, great...!! i am really happy to hear^^ (as an Italian beginner


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DetaGallucci

If "legge" is the 3rd he/she/it conjugation of the verb leggere, then why isn't the translation "Who reads it?" -- or some such thing. Is "it" just understood? How do you know the sentance isn't refering to a he or she somehow?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BampaOwl

"Who reads it?" would be "Chi lo legge?". "Who" (Chi) is the Subject, "it" (lo) is the Object. "Chi legge" does not have an Object. It means simply "Who reads?", in effect "Who reads anything". Or you could have "Lo legge?", which means "Does he (or she) read it?", the he/she being understood as there is no other Subject in the sentence. HTH


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DetaGallucci

Thank you! Very helpful explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rnablade6

WHAT?!?!?!?!? OUTRAGE!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenFog2

Fricken' nerrrrds, that's who. Right broski? Up top!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielHoch5

I read this as "whore ads", thanks to Sean Connery's celebrity jeopardy moment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I-AM-THE-STAR

Not me,the monkey and the turtle reads!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BiggestBackflip

Yeah who even reads these days?

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