"Magst du Knoblauch?"

Translation:Do you like garlic?

October 9, 2015

4 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FreakyFruit

What's the literal translation of Knoblauch?

October 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thebluepencil

Apparently, "cloven leek".

From Wiktionary:

From Middle High German knobelouch, with dissimilation from Old High German chlobalouh. The latter part of the word is, of course, Lauch ‎(“leek”). The first part originally pertains to klieben ‎(“to cleave”), but was later adapted to the large group of terms for thick objects beginning with kn- (cf. Knopf, Knoten, Knolle, etc.). The same in Dutch knoflook.

Another explanation from aglicrudo.it:

The German na­me of garlic is Knob­lauch and cognate with Dutch knof­look; short forms in regional use include Knobi, Knofel and the Yiddish form knobl [קנאָבל]. Folk etymology holds that the first element knob- relates to knot (because the leaves of garlic are frequently tied together to improve growth of the subterranean parts), but in truth, the initial kn cluster evolved from dis­simila­tion of earlier kl (Old High German kloba­louh, Middle High German klobe­louch). That element belongs to a verb stem klieb-, meaning split (cf. English cleave); deriving from Proto-Indo–European GLEUBʰ cut, carve, peel, it is related to Greek glyphis [γλυφίς] notch, mark and Latin glubere peel. The second element -lauch is, of course, equivalent to English -lic.

October 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bahenj2

you like garlic? and Do you like Garlic? are the same thing

March 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vatrat

"Magst du Knoblauch?" and "Du magst Knoblauch?" are not the same. As well, "Do you like garlic?" and "You [do] like garlic?" are not the same.

June 21, 2016
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