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"Ella lo logró durante veinte años."

Translation:She achieved it for twenty years.

5 years ago

86 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/qajax
qajax
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how about ... over ... 20 years

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markbooth
markbooth
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That's what I went for. It was marked correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caversham
Caversham
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my preferred option as well, in the sense of: over a period of 20 years.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phle
phle
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what´s wrong with "in 20 years" then?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rwmorris

That would likely be written 'en veinte anos' and imply that the act was achieved only at the end of the twenty year period. Here, durante is used to show that it was achieved over the course of the twenty year period. It's a slight distinction, and you'd really need more context to know which one was correct. Additionally, durante also means 'for', so again, the implication is that it was something that was achieved for a twenty year period, as opposed to something achieved at the end of a twenty year period.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

@ phle: Nothing's wrong with it. That was my answer and it was accepted.

Edit:
No longer accepted as of Apr 2018. And after three years, I'm still struggling on what this Spanish sentence could mean.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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Apparently, it's more like, "she did it for twenty years". I found it in context and that's how it seems to translate.

http://www.escaner.cl/escaner23/perfiles.htm Lower middle of the page (above a bold title). Probably easiest to use the find key.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

Thank you, michisjourdi!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisFowle1

My preference as well but didn't put it in fear that DL would think I was trying to be smart lol.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalousjack

How about simply choosing a different sentence to use logró in, there's millions out there

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drepple
drepple
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Achieve is to arrive at a goal after working on it for a time. Achieving happens at a point in time and is not something that can go on for years. So, agreeing with others, achieve is not the correct word here.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

English grammar disagrees.

http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/simplepast.html

:)

Also, see my reply to nake89.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drepple
drepple
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An interesting grammar page and it certainly does show a selection of verbs that work well in the simple past for a series of completed actions and past habits. I can think of cases where "achieve" also could be used (She achieved success at painting for 20 years. But I guess whether to "achieve" something for 20 years makes sense depends on the context. The primary meaning for achieve is "to bring to a successful end" (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/achieve?s=t) with origin "Old French achever to finish," (same reference). An end is not something you usually think of going on for 20 years.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

You can also achieve a mental state that lasts for a duration of time instead of just the momentary completion of obtaining it. So you're right, it depends on context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael189866

In that case you achieve it at the start, and you then maintain the state you achieved. ''Drepple'' correctly referred to the Old French, but the Old French itself comes from Latin where ''Venire ad caput'' quite literally means to come to a head. Yes words and phrases can change their meaning as well as their form (especially once the media or computer software companies grab hold of them) but the original meaning is always a good clue as to which direction we should steer.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Would you say that if it was "She earned it over twenty years"? She worked at something over twenty years, and at the end of those twenty years, she had earned something. Perfectly acceptable, and quite common.

"Achieved" is maybe a little peculiar, in this usage. But definitely not wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoctilucaFirefly

It can be correct. You are correct in that achieve often is used for something that is now complete but it can also be used for ongoing things that you are still maintaining achievement of. Such as 'She achieved sobriety for twenty years'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael189866

But that is a misuse. She maintained sobriety over 20 years, having achieved it at the start. She achieved a remarkable record of 20 years' sobriety at the end of the period.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dberthold

This is clunky English. Most native speakers would say "over a twenty-year period," or even better, "it took her twenty years to achieve it." It seems the Spanish meaning is that this one achievement took twenty years to accomplish. Correct?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Precisely.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitcorb

Somehow, achieve doesn't seem to belong. Achieve in my mind represents completion of a goal, kind of a one time occurrence. Then you move on to achieve other goals?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Z0bie

Take into account how long you work towards this goal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joar3000

This could also be referring to something being achieved consecutively for 20 years. "her goal was to cycle to work everyday, she achieved it for twenty years"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

In that case the verb would likely be in the Imperfect, not the Preterite.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nake89
nake89
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This doesn't sound like proper english. During or for...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

If by proper you mean grammatically correct, then yes it's "proper" English.

  • She = subject, subject pronoun
  • achieved = verb, simple past
  • it = object, direct object
  • for twenty years = duration

Let's use that same equation but change some words.

  • She lived in California for twenty years.
  • He studied Portuguese for twenty years.
  • They ate vegetables for twenty years.

Now, let's come back to the original sentence and define "it" as enlightenment, i.e. have "it" be the pronoun for the noun, "enlightenment".

  • She achieved enlightenment for twenty years.

:)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

All of your examples would be Imperfect tense, which is used to describe things happening over an extended period of time. The Preterite is used to describe things that happened at a specific discrete point in time.

Also, the "for" you have there would in every case be "por", not "durante".

This is, "She achieved it over twenty years." She worked at it for twenty years, and at the end of that, at one specific moment, boom! she achieved it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam_Robb
Sam_Robb
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^This! Great explanation which scratched all of my mental itches about this sentence. Bummer that Duolingo currently doesn't accept that translation.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fenec
fenec
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Shouldn't it be 'in' 20 years?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gro_com

The meaning is that she was able to do something during 20 years, if you use 'in' the mening is that it took 20 years to achive it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SoccerStripes

This grammar is not right...You can't achieve something for twenty years, you can achieve it after twenty years...this is wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hokusai_1
Hokusai_1
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I am not a native English speaker "She achieved it for twenty years" sounds like she have got the permission to do something, she signed a contract, took a mortgage or she can start a business, she finished the act to sign a contract, but she still have to do whatever is in the contract or she just began with it . Please feel free to correct if I am not correct in my reasoning, like I said, I am not an English speaker

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Would the preterito be used for continual action (for twenty years)? Maybe the imperfect tense is better here. But at best, this is an awkward sentence.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

No, preterite is associated with simple past (such as this sentence) while the imperfect is similar to "was achieving" and "used to achieve".

http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/simplepast.html

"The Simple Past can be used with a duration which starts and stops in the past. A duration is a longer action often indicated by expressions such as: for two years, for five minutes, all day, all year, etc."

:)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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The "twenty years" part seemed to imply repeated action on the past. Do you understand my confusion?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

I do, read my reply to nake89.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preterite#Spanish

"In Spanish, the preterite (pretérito) is a verb tense that indicates that an action taken once in the past was completed at a specific point in time in the past."

That matches with the use of the English "simple present" from the first link that I replied to your first post with.

Likewise, achieving enlightenment is a single event. Here's another similar example of a single event that happened over a duration of time:

  • I talked with him for three hours. = single event of talking with him that began and ended, with a duration of three hours.
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertaRfr

Something doesn't sound English. The meaning of "achieve" implies completion and sounds strange with an adverb phrase of duration "for twenty years". Perhaps we need another meaning for the Spanish verb "logro" in this sentence --- excelled?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miza713

Yes, but when does become completed? What about the following example: "There is no way I can get this done in one day." "Well, she accomplished it for twenty years." It's true that we may throw in "every day for twenty years" to specify how often this action was accomplished, but without that clause, the sentence is still technically valid.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
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I'm not a native English speaker, but I looked up at google dictionary and found out that 'to achieve' can also mean 'to perform' or 'to do' , and not only 'to attain'. So, it is quiet logic to perform something (again and again...) for twenty years, and it is different than to attain something in twenty years of work.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
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I have just found that 'lograr' can also mean 'to bring off' which means 'to perform'

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/circumbendibus
circumbendibus
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I'm a native English speaker. Although achieve is GRAMMATICALLY correct, "achieve enlightenment" is the only phrase it makes any sense in. Even that is only used in the context of things like meditation. 'Perform' makes some, sense but I've never heard 'bring off'. It sounds kind of dirty, but maybe it's regional. I'm in the US.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gitanomama

Does this sentence mean the "she was able to manage the same accomplishment year after year" or "she was able to accomplish something by working at it over a period of twenty years." The first "she gave a Christmas party every year for 20 years". The second "she transformed the hospital procedures over a period of 20 years."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatricioJiang

Although a more natural sounding English translation might be "She has been successful at it for twenty years", it strays too far from the literal translation, "She it achieved during (for) twenty years".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimmy232Neiman

the two translations I saw are both bad. Only in the answer to a question would the pronoun "it" be appropriate. And I assume the meaning is "over twenty years", unless its something she "has achieved continuously for a duration of twenty"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michaelgeater

This doesn't even make any sense

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territrades
territradesPlus
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And the Oscar for the most incomprehensible audio goes to ....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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I did a google search and found this in context.

Here is the paragraph in Spanish: Es un hecho que Hashepsut logró construir más templos, obeliscos y obras públicas en general que todas las reinas egipcias juntas, posteriores a ella. Pero su labor no sólo nos refleja la grandeza a que podía aspirarse como Faraón, hombre o mujer, sino también los riesgos que la empresa suponía. Más que nada sostenerse con vida en el poder. Ella lo logró durante veinte años.

In English: It is a fact that Hashepsut managed to build more temples, obelisks and public works in general than all the Egyptian queens together after her. But her work not only reflects the greatness that could aspire as Pharaoh, man or woman, but also the risks that the company involved. More than anything sustain life in power. She did it for twenty years.

So a rough translation is that this is something she DID for twenty years. So people in the other comments are right. Achieved doesn't fit.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quesowhat

so, "durante veinte años" is "for twenty years", and "hace veinte años" would be "after twenty years"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jtimmons
jtimmons
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I think "hace veinte años" is "twenty years ago."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gro_com

'hace veinte años' - twenty years ago

'tras veinte años' - after twenty years

the diference is if the action has lasted for 20 years or it happend 20 yeras ago.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

and, fyi quesowhat, "desde hace veinte anos" is "for 20 years".....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bogeszka

wtf again:" she achieved it in twenty years" is wrong, because it wants for instead of in???! come on.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gitanomama

"She achieved it in 20 yrs" means something different from "She achieve it for twenty years." The little words are always a problem

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glen1.macdonald

"She did it for twenty years", according to our friends at Google.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

I guess she really liked to do it !!??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrahamRawlinson

Yes, she did it for 20 years sounds like the only sensible translation, if 20 years ago is not allowed

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackieescobar1

That's what I wrote and it told me I was wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Google's wrong. An action carried on continuously for an extended period would be Imperfect, not Preterite.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I didn't get it right but I don't see issues with Duo's answer. I can see someone saying "she was able to lead the race for years. She achieved it for twenty years."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatricioJiang

I see now that the Spanish language lacking a word for "it" must sometimes demand that a reference be made to "it" using the direct object pronoun "lo", or the indirect object pronoun "le". Often we find some "it" receiving action, so we must make accomodations for that reference using the proper pronoun in the proper place. In the phrase "lo mismo", I finally understand this more concretely.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jbauer1414

I think I might have a unique situation where this works (although I don't believe it really works otherwise). "She achieved sobriety for twenty years OR She achieved it for twenty years"

Thoughts?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gitanomama

"she achieve" is the subjunctive, which is rarely used in American English. "I insist that she achieve even more!" The present is "she achieves", the past "she achieved" or "she did achieve"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hollyrosell

I appreciated the comment about lograr meaning "perform". It makes sense in English to say she performed it (her job, her act, etc) for 20 years.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soniawargas

The best translation would be "She has achieved it for twenty years." as there´s this idea of repeated action, i.e., sth was accomplished over and over again. When we say "She achieved", we don´t give the idea of repeated action. That´s why it sounds weird.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benjino
Benjino
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"She was able to for 20 years." is corrected with "She was able to do it for 20 years."... Why??? :(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Reading this discussion, I see that the problem is that no one really understands what the sentence in Spanish means. Without knowing the meaning, we cannot agree on the correct translation in English. Prepositions "during", "in", and "for" could all be good, depending on what it means in Spanish. I wish some native Spanish speaker would tell us what it means.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/plasticflywheel

Neither my correct answer nor the alternative offered really sounds right in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/d3nomenator
d3nomenator
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Nice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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'she achieved it during twenty years' was graded correct for me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MOOSEWHISKER

am I the only one who heard "no" instead of "lo"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blizziegirl

What is the preferred translation for this one? I am really having trouble understanding how this would work in English context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aelfwyne

I tried "She did it for twenty years" and that was marked wrong. The problem is, if the English translation is BAD, then there is no way someone is going to learn the correct usage either way. If the English translation makes no sense, then neither does the Spanish to an English speaker.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PupherFish

Even with turtle, logro is impossible to understand. Wowza!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoryMinor.

Is this the Krusty Krab?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pppaul

this is a very strange english translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakeMeyers5

this is bs

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vincent231588

What's the infinitive verb form of logro?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valerie307480

no-one would say "for 20 years" - over 20 years is the only correct solution, but was given as incorrect by Duolingo.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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The translation should really read "She achieved it over [a period of] twenty years, not for.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toppy3207

Nowhere in the dictionary hints does it say lo logro means managed

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pablodeaussie

Is there anything wrong with durante meaning during in this exercise?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loubbles
loubbles
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I also put during twenty years, they said it was wrong?? for me durante means during.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

the english translation of this sentense sounds like she achieved it for twenty years and then the achievement went away, how about she achieved it in twenty years? would that make sense?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sabine959064

Report: she did it should be accepted

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RebeccaBan13

during should be accepted as well as. for 20 yrs.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael189866

I have a feeling that this sentence, taken without any context, is as imprecise in Spanish as it is in English. We really don't learn anything from debating it. Move on...

5 days ago