"Det gikk bra takket være legen."

Translation:It went well thanks to the doctor.

October 11, 2015

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NuggetPls

Literally does this mean "thanked be the doctor"?

January 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/alek_d
Mod
  • 96

Yes.

March 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CorgiAtom

Thanks! was trying to figure it out also

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/shad_w

This is a mirky sentence for me. Is this "thanks to" the doctor?

March 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/alek_d
Mod
  • 96

Literally it is "thanked be the doctor", but it does not sound anywhere near as formal in Norwegian.

March 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/katzenjammerfan

it's the same construction in german: Es ging gut dank sei dem arzt

May 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex563242

Spelling: Es ging gut, dank (sei) dem Arzt.

January 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/shad_w

Ok, I got it. Thanks!

March 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Liam.Boyd

I think the English sentence/translation is clunky. Why can't it be "it went well thanks to the doctor"?

June 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 163

That is our default translation.

June 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Barentsz89

"Good" instead of "Ok"?

October 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Mikevd0106

Doctor who?

July 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyLowings

Old English: Thanks be to God. (subjunctive)

December 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/cursorcorner

English is a mixed bag of many different languages since it developed at the crossroads of many cultures. That's why there are so many ways to say the same thing, and why so many things like this can be found in it's history.

February 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyLowings

I think it's more due here to grammar changing over time. There are some grammatical hangovers in Norwegian too. " trives " (and verbs ending in s); "till sengs till skogs" (dative case endings) being a couple .

July 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Indrejan

What does this sentence mean? Doesn't make sense

May 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/alek_d
Mod
  • 96

Well, something turned out well because the doctor did something.

May 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyLowings

can one say also "takk til legen"? I am sure I heard this someplace.

October 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 163

You can say it, but not in this context. It would be used to thank him/her in a public manner.

"Takk til legen, sykepleierne..."
"Thank you to the doctor, the nurses..."

January 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/smaakatter

Does takket være have the same meaning as på grunn av?

June 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/alek_d
Mod
  • 96

It's similar, but with "takket være" the outcome is positive, wheras with "på grunn av" it could be either positive, negative or neutral.

June 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/xoflram

How would one say " It walked well thanks to the doctor". As in the doctor helped repair a leg injury or something?

December 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Liam.Boyd

The verb å gå can be used for the verb "to walk", but it can also be used for the English verb "to go". In this instance, gikk is not the past tense of walk, but the past tense of go -> went.

Therefore, the sentence reads in English: "It WENT well thanks to the doctor".

December 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/xoflram

Is ¨gikk¨ always ¨went¨? Or can it also be ¨walked¨ in some intances?

December 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Liam.Boyd

"Gikk" can be "went" or "walked" depending on the context.

December 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/xoflram

So how might one differentiate the two options in the context of this sentence?

December 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CommissarFeesh

You would need the larger contextual clues of the situation, but given that the sentence was "det" rather than "hun" or "han", it doesn't obviously seem to be directly referring to a person as the subject. So I would assume the translation to be "went" rather than "walked" without some very specific context to inform me otherwise.

January 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/hmada993

How do we say the same sentence in the present

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 163

Replace "gikk" with "går".

January 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/nieudany

So, can I use something like "Det går bra" meaning "It is going well"?

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 163

Yes.

It's also what you'd use to say "It's okay" or "Don't worry about it" if someone spills a drink on you and you're able to fight the urge to retaliate.

January 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/justahumblephebs

Correct me if Im wrong, but I think a common phrase in Norwegian that is comparable to "It goes (well)" or "It's okay" is "Det gå fint".

October 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyLowings

It's odd that indeed å gå means both to walk, and to go (well) but not to be used for when you can't actually walk like "I went by plane" ..though perhaps you can say "the plane flight went well". Flyturen gikk bra.

October 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/justahumblephebs

so many little nuances, eh? cheers!

October 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Amix73

Why is "That went well thanks to the doctor" wrong - I thought "det" also means "that"?

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Amix73

Haha, because I can't read and my typo-correction fooled me again - I wrote: "That week well thanks to the doctor". I love it!

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/MarioBlazej

What a totally bad english. More Norglish thsn English

February 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 163

You've just proven that it could be worse, so thank you for that.

January 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyLowings

How nice you use the correct tense for "to prove". Thanks for keeping the proper usage going. Albeit in Norway.

October 27, 2018
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