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https://www.duolingo.com/Eikoopmit

Third language suggestions?

I'm somewhat through the tree, with anywhere between one and two months to go before I finish the tree and am left with nothing but practice. So far, I've been doing Irish as the only language that I'm learning, but lots of people seem to be doing multiple languages at once. As such, I'm asking what some suggestions for a third language might be. I'm thinking maybe a Romance language so that I can have some experience in that group, but also maybe a Germanic language because I'm more used to Germanic languages as a native English speaker. Or, alternately, I could simply just wait out Welsh in the incubator for a few months, but I was thinking that, as I have the time, I could save it as a fourth language if I can successfully balance two languages at once.

2 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Why not actually work on getting your Irish to a good level? Duolingo will only give you the basic level of Irish, and certainly won't give you any practice actually using it. It takes a lot more to learn a language than completing a tree on Duolingo. So why not get a good level of Irish?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Maybe you could do Esperanto? It's the easiest language in the world to learn. I only started it to stop my brain from having a meltdown from learning Irish, but iv'e really come to like it. It's extremely easy and it sounds very nice as well. The vocabulary also mainly comes from the romance languages, and would make learning one of them a lot easier in the future.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

> It's the easiest language in the world to learn.

For who? Ease of learning is so subjective.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConorHoughton
ConorHoughton
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I would also recommend Esperanto, it is fun and it does lead you to reflect on the nature of language; what parts are needed and what are accidents of culture. It is surprisingly easy too, the grammar is completely regular, lots of the words are formed by a system of affixes and many of the words are easy to guess from English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bellichka
bellichka
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I know Italian and Spanish fairly well, and a smattering of French.... and I felt like Esperanto was so hard! I gave up after awhile. When you already have the basics in a handful of languages, Esperanto (imho) just feels like a mish-mash of languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ezkertia
Ezkertia
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The question of which language to learn next is a very personal one. Without some insight into your objectives for learning another language, it's hard to make a recommendation that's more than my personal preferences. What are your goals in working on another language? What kind of information do you hope people who answer your question will give you (the grammar/phonetics of X will be easy/hard for speakers of English, X is a well written course on DuoLingo, X will expose you to grammatical concept Y, ...)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eikoopmit

I have no real motivation. I guess I'd like to be able to say that I know multiple languages just for bragging rights, but that's about it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveLando
SteveLando
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English speakers (which I am not nativly) uselly seems to think that French and Spanish are quit easy to learn, many words that are similair (espec. for French) and concerning Spanish also a simplified grammar (and pronounciation). From the germanic languages maybe Dutch also very often seems quit easy, even tho German are more useful internationally, but harder grammaticaly (but easier spelling).

Or why not have a go on easygoing Esperanto, which is said to be benificially for further language studying, you also get a lot input on the romance languages via it.

If you self think you are up to it, then do it. It's not harder to do several languages at the same time, but it's more timeconsuming, of course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eikoopmit

Alright. I might do Spanish, then, because Catalan and one other language which I forget at the moment at the moment only exist in the incubator from Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenaki.a
Elenaki.a
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Why don't you keep working on irish, if you still want to do it? There's accessible resources and you could possibly put more time into speaking with others, which would be cool. As for a third language, if you're interested in Welsh, wait for it while you further your irish maybe.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Don_Cristian
Don_Cristian
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Swedish of course ! It could be quite easy to you, or Dutch.

2 years ago