"Er sieht, dass du ein Buch hast."

Translation:He sees that you have a book.

October 14, 2015

162 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashkan.Kalantari

Can any body explain why a comma is used after "Er sieht"? As an English speaker, this is difficult for me to understand.

October 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

This is required German punctuation between a main clause and a subordinate clause.

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twitterbug86

So German punctuation will separate a subject and verb from a direct object? That's what threw me off as well.

December 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awefulwaffle

Here's a link to an English-language discussion about German punctuation marks. Scroll down to "Das Komma" and "linking clauses" :

EDIT: reply to twitterbug

You are correct. The UTexas webpage doesn't discuss independent/dependent clauses.

Below is an explanation in the original French accompanied by my English translation.

paragraph 1.3.12 Remarque sur la ponctuation [Note about punctuation]

En allemand, on place toujours une virgule entre la proposition principale et la proposition subordonnée.

[In German, one always puts a comma between the main clause and the subordinate clause.]

  • Ich weiß, dass ich Recht habe.
  • Sie haben angerufen, um uns einzuladen.

Il n’y as pas de virgule devant un infinitif sans complément, il peut se trouver une virgule devant une proposition infinitive.

[There is no comma before an infinitive without a complement. A comma can be placed before an infinitive clause.]

  • Sie hat mir versprochen wiederzukommen.
  • Sie hat mir versprochen(,) nächstes Wochenende wiederzukommen.

(Allemand - Grammaire pratique de l'étudiant, Heinz Bouillant, page 228)

January 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twitterbug86

That a great article, although I'm still a little confused about one thing. The article said German punctuation will allow two independent clauses to be connected by a coma. However, in this sentence, it is connecting an independent clause with a dependent clause (which is actually acting as the direct object of the independent clause). Did the article leave that usage out? (I'm hoping so because it would be a whole lot easier to remember).

Thank you for your help, and sorry to go all English grammarian on you.

January 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awefulwaffle

See my edited comment, instead of a reply, to avoid losing space to another indent.

January 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twitterbug86

Thank you so much for that explanation of the rule. I understand it now...the hard part will be remembering it.

January 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leolf1011

Danke schön!

May 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LAbbeyW

Hi ive got a way that might make it easier to remember - my german teacher always used to tell us that the other words used to hate the ' 'weil' and other words like that because it was 'vile ' (pronunciation), and the comma would protect the words. I dunno if this helps x :-)

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuliusBawa

I love this. Do you have more tips like this please? :)

September 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jussel11

The comma is not used for the "er sieht". But in front of every "dass" (with 2 "s") is a comma.

December 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

, Dass du das mit "immer" formulierst beeindruckt mich :D

December 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmitriyRud

Same rule applies in Russian and Ukrainian

February 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/codeic

Can you give an example in Russian?

March 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarisRustom

Can someone please explain the reason of the word order in this sentence? Thanks

October 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/igelchen

"Er sieht" - "He sees". So far, so clear, I hope.
And the second part of the sentence, without dass ("that") would be "Du hast ein Buch" ("you have a book"), right?
But between those two parts of the sentence, there's dass, which changes everything. Or well, not everything, but a little. It's a subordinating conjunction (like weil, seit, obwohl, etc.), which means two things:
1. it has to be preceeded by a comma (= "Er sieht, dass"),
and
2. it pushes the verb to the end of the clause. The verb in this case is "hast". Everything else stays the same.
So instead of "Er sieht, dass du [hast] ein Buch", it is now "Er sieht, dass du ein Buch hast".

October 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mac266

Wow...the Duolingo staff should remove their explanation and copy-and-paste yours!

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadyAzalea

They have an explaination???

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nate896107

Yes, but you must be using the browser version of Duolingo.

September 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HedayatKam

Danke

February 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarisRustom

Danke :)

October 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tawnyfrogmouth

Just when I thought I was getting a grip on German grammar it throws in a wobbly like subordinating conjunctions!

Thank-you for this very clear explanation about dass (rather than das) being a subordinating conjunction

October 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johndilio

Excellent answer, short and precise.

November 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sky.walker1234

Du bist super! :)

January 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gotenks33

is it affecting the speaking too? I mean, when I speak - should I hold a bit after the first parts?

February 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/igelchen

Yes, the comma is "spoken". Mind you though, that change is minimal. You can make it as weak or strong as you like, but for language learners, many commas will be hardly noticeable in the speech of most native speakers (just like in any other language, really). In this case ("er sieht, dass..."), the t of "sieht" and the d of "dass" just mix together into a slightly stronger stronger "d" when I say it, whereas in a sentence like "er sieht das Haus", they come together into a normal "d".

February 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heilswahrheit

Correct, this is called ellision, to facilitate smooth pronunciation.

January 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucifawx

Now it's just a matter of retaining this on my road to speaking German fluently.

February 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/musmoulay

Great explanation, thank you. Is there a list of subordinating conjunctions, i.e. those conjunctions that send the verb to the end?

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/igelchen

Yes:
http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/Grammatik/Konjunktionen/Konjunktionen.html
it's the long list on the right hand side. I haven't checked it for completeness, but I guess even if a few are missing, it's most important to know what kind of word has this power rather than to know each single word on a list :)

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/musmoulay

thanks. I understand what you mean about getting to know which are the "powerful" types, capable of banishing the verb to the end!

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmrGne

Danke

November 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidDavidTF

Viele Danke mate

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lilragedjash

Danke

May 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shivani_arora

Thanks for explaining it so well.

December 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeinOderJa

Vielen Dank!

January 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davelongdublin

cheers, thats make sense now !

February 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mar915238

Thanks a lot, this always throws me off !

April 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaws1234

Thank you so much.

May 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barnonahill

Thank you!

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dark.sun1989

great explain, thank you

July 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zaubers

Danke!

September 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harmonym5

So, my understanding is that in any sentence if you have a subordinate conjuction it will always push the verb at the end?

June 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rozieland

Du bist ein Genie. Vielen Dank!

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Surabhi099

Danke!!!

June 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARW1989

Thanks!

September 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHUMiami87

Genius

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frcokla

and could you pleas explain me this clause: Wenn sie kommt, essen wir! Here is Verb after coma. thank you

March 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

In that case, the subordinate clause is first.

wenn sie kommt starts with the conjuncation wenn, and has the verb kommt at the end.

That entire subordinate clause takes up the first position in the main clause, and so the verb comes immediately after it in order to be in the second position where it belongs.

So Wenn sie kommt, essen wir! is grammatically similar to Jetzt essen wir -- in both cases, essen is in the second position, only that in one case, the first position is just one word jetzt, on the other an entire clause wenn sie kommt.

March 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve877309

Danke

August 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theluji

what is the difference between ''das'' and ''dass''? I know ''das'' is an article for neuter nouns, but I thought ''das'' could also be used as that?

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nemesis_NaR

Yes, "das" is being used as "that" as well, however the "that" used for connecting of a main and subordinate clause is a different word and that is "dass". This doesn't apply to German only, but for (most of) the Slavic languages as well. And it isn't possible to leave it out as in English.

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phill858962

Really English 'that' is doing double duty with two separate meanings.

November 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theluji

dankeschön!

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luzreimann

Need help

February 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmarEssam.EG

"Dass" doesn't easily get along with verbs, so she kicks them to the end of the sentences.

January 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QuitTheJargon42

What is the difference between "dass" and "das" when they both seem to mean "that"

April 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Das means "that" only when it is not a subordinating conjunction. "Das ist gut." is "That is good." This is used as a demonstrative pronoun. (Of course, "das Buch" is "the book". There it is used as a definite article.) "dass" is always "that" when used as a subordinating conjunction. "I know that it is good." is "Ich weiß, dass das gut ist." ( Technically, that is "I know that that is good." but in German they can get away with it better because they have two different words. ) or literally "Ich weiß, dass es gut ist."

October 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aly.c.sch

Where can I learn about word order in German? I've been having a difficult time understanding the reasoning

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alishialouise

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ddvhtelb4OY This is the first episode of six episodes that this you tuber that I follow has done on german syntax (sentence structure/word order)

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0zgurka

Why "he is seeing" is incorrect?

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

In English, this verb form is not used with certain verbs of perception including all the senses: see, feel, hear, touch, smell. Although, "he is seeing her" is an expression meaning that "he is dating her". It doesn't take a second to see that someone has something, after that you already have the information in your brain. You could continue to see that person, but the perception is already received. So, it is incorrect in English.

October 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ubergrape

What other circumstances are there where you're supposed to talk like Yoda?

October 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuliusBawa

When you feel the force

October 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

I just want to add to this discussion that it is perfectly fine in English to omit the "that." E.g. *He sees you have a book." However, it is not accepted. In the interest of representing what a real native speaker would say, and also for the sake of timed practice, I reported it (June 3, 2019).

June 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/horebin

Can it also be: Er sieht, DAS du ein buch hast?

April 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No, that's not possible.

June 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaroniaSonia

If I go to Germany and accidentally say, "Er sieht dass du hast ein Buch," will people understand me? Would it sound like, "The book orange," instead of "the orange book?"

April 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

You'll probably be understood.

Just like people who say things such as "Can you tell me what is the way to the station?" or "I do not know why does this sentence is wrong." will generally be understood in English.

August 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mzingarelli

During conversation, do I have to make a pause, since there is a comma, or can I speak like there were no comma?

November 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mitchcanadian

Great question. During a typical conversation, the pause is still there, however it is much less noticable than Duolingo says it. Still, don't neglect the comma. Its main use in this type of sentence isn't to put a pause (even though that's quite important too), but instead to seperate the clauses from each other, which is basic German grammar.

November 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The.Other.Caleb

Yes, Ken Ham, Bill Nye sees that you have a book.

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanMoffatt

Okay i have seen this rule in a lot of German sentences, but why is Buch and hast swapped. Can someone explain.

August 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Please see the comment thread on this page that was started by FarisRustom, where igelchen explains the word order.

August 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MidAirPlayer

Is 'dass' the same like 'ke' in Esperanto?

December 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes! That's pretty much exactly the same.

December 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuFan0

I'm wondering if the native German speakers will pause when they meet this kind of commas (showing main clause and the sub one). Do they really pause shortly or just ignore it?

January 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I think that I pause briefly at that comma.

(But I might be deluding myself based on the written form.)

January 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chady.nsr

i should have learned Japanese

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the.pyat

so dass in essence Yodafies the german that comes after it.

October 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArvidSvenby

Why is it "dass" with two s', and not "das"

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because "that" here is a conjunction -- joining the clause "you have a book" to the clause "he sees".

German spells the conjunction dass.

It's an artificial spelling distinction, a bit like "to" versus "too" in English. (We can't say "you are to loud" or "you are going too a park", though in German the word is still the same: du bist zu laut; du gehst zu einem Park.)

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidDavidTF

¿Can it be "Das du hast ein Buch"?

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No -- the verb hast goes to the end of a subordinate clause (including all subordinate clauses started by dass).

June 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkoch

The comma is interesting, still confuses me coming from English. The spoke punctuation is the same, and some people put a comma before 'that' in a sentence like this, but this is incorrect in terms of the written language. E.g.: - I see, that you have a book. (Wrong Engslish, correct German) - I see that you have a book. (Correct English, wrong German?) Is the comma strictly required in German, or is it just common practice? I know that Russian requires a comma there as well.

It throws a whole new light on English punctuation - because it means the loss of that comma in written English is historically incorrect (given English has Germanic roots).

April 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UmaObasi

The English simplified things and reduced the heavy requirement for punctuation. A comma hardly comes after a THAT

August 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hechap

Another version, to show what all is going on here: Sie sehen, dass du einen Hund hast. They see that you have a dog. Correct me if needed, please!

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Your sentence is correct.

August 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hitormisshi

I don't understand why in German they sometime put verbs after the noun instead of putting the verb before the noun.

August 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mitchcanadian

When you are talking to a person, how do you know when they say "das", and when they say "dass"?

August 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

They have different grammatical roles, so usually only one or the other even makes sense.

I'm not sure whether there can be a sentence where both das or dass could work in a given position.

August 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnselZhang1

Can I use "dass" if I want to say "dass haus ist groß"?

October 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No; that is not correct.

August 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ijohnston1

can anybody explain why its not I see a book you have

November 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

That is a slightly different sentence "I see a book you have." is short for "I see a book that you have."
In this sentence the emphasis is not just on the book. In your version, I am adding information about the book. In this sentence, I see something about you.
"I see that you have a book." could be shortened to " I see you have a book." In German, they cannot omit the subordinating conjugation "dass" as we do with "that".

October 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkkaAmka

Why "that"??? any body explain pease!! Why not "if"

November 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aquaplant

dass in german means "that" in english. For example: I know that you eat my food.

November 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GerardoCampnou

Does anyone now when I use "dass"?

January 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Only for "that" when used as a subordinating conjunction. http://dictionary.reverso.net/german-english/dass

October 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nelly2E0DT

Ja danke! A great explanation very concise

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunal_Wadgaonkar

what is the difference between "das" and "dass". How will I know what to use? Please help

March 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christianYETI

das=the dass=that hope this helps :-)

March 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunal_Wadgaonkar

Danke!

March 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christianYETI

your welcome!

March 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

There is more to it than that "das" can mean "that" as a demonstrative pronoun, but never as the subordinating conjunction which would always be "dass". http://dictionary.reverso.net/german-english/dass http://dictionary.reverso.net/german-english/das

October 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hailey_Kristine

There is no dass. Did anyone catch that?

April 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

What do you mean? "dass" exists and is "that" when it introduces a dependant clause. Scroll up for more information.

October 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SchonBaume

"der" vs "das" vs "dass"?

April 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christianYETI

read my post 7 comments above.

April 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosVictorA7

So is "dass" similar to "weil" in the sense of putting the verb at the end of the sentence?

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That's right. They both start subordinate clauses, which have the inflected verb at the end.

June 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oscar924530

What if i wrote ich sieht dass du hat ein buch

July 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Then that would simply be wrong.

About like "I sees that you a book has".

July 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nikolai162470

... ummmmmmmmm

September 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudithMett2

I'm ashamed to admit that I did not know which of der das and dass to choose. Can someone please clarify why dass is the correct choice?

October 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nate896107

"dass" means "that." It introduces a subordinate clause for reporting information. Totally different from "das." (Not a native speaker but pretty sure on this one.)

October 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuliusBawa

Der and das are the masculine and neuter article "the" respectively, while dass is "that" which I think is a conjunction in this case.....

October 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Official-EU

Wann sagte dir dass, und wann sagte dir das?

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Are you trying to say: "When do you say dass and when do you say das?" ?

The linguistic explanation: use dass when it's a conjunction, das when it's a demonstrative determiner, demonstrative pronoun, definite article, or relative pronoun.

The simple rule of thumb: if you can replace "that" with "which" or "this" and still have it make grammatical sense, use das, otherwise dass.

"This is the car that I bought last month / This is the car which I bought last month" -- works, so das ist das Auto, dass ich letzten Monat gekauft habe.

"I want to buy that book / I want to buy this bok" -- works, so Ich möchte das Buch kaufen

"I know that you are my son / I know this you are my son / I know which you are my son" -- doesn't work, so Ich weiß, dass du mein Sohn bist.

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thatguy94

Why dass and not das

February 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because you need a conjunction here, not a relative pronoun or a demonstrative.

German spells the conjunction dass rather than das, while English uses the same spelling "that" for both uses.

February 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peachyprince324

Why is there a comma???????????

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because German grammar wants one there (before a subordinate clause).

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gransview

So, if in doubt, stick in a comma?

April 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UniquelyEllie

What is the difference between das and dass?

May 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Grammatically speaking: das is a definite article, a demonstrative determiner, or a demonstrative pronoun; dass is a conjunction.

(I'm not sure how to explain it less technically, since this is a more or less artificial spelling distinction; they both correspond to different meanings of English "that".)

May 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liayden

I entered - Er seiht, dass du ein buch hast Duo reported a typo unless DUO was highlighting a lack of a Capitalisation of Buch then I cannot see where the typo is, a little pedantic perhaps but I suppose that is the point.

September 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

er seiht is an uncommon verb meaning “he sifts” (he pours through a sieve).

er sieht is the spelling for “he sees”

September 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melika414355

What's the meaning of '' dass'' ?

October 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElifNazztr

When do we use dass?

October 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Party4Arty

What does dass mean

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"that"

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntonSaz

May be slightly off-topic, but can "daß" be used instead of "dass"? The answer shows the latter as the correct one, though it accepts both.

December 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

daß is the pre-1996 spelling.

So you will still see people using it: older people who learned to write before that time. But it’s not current spelling.

December 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giovanni4-2

Why isn't "das" accepted and "dass" is? I thought it's the same

February 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No, they are not the same.

The conjunction (Italian “che”) is spelled dass.

It’s an artificial spelling distinction (in English das and dass are still the same word, “that”) but the two are not interchangeable any more than, say, “to” and “too” in English (a similarly artificial spelling distinction in what had originally been one word and still is in German).

February 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mark903536

why wouldn't this be stated as .. "du hast ein buch"

February 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

du hast ein Buch just means "you have a book".

For the entire sentence "He sees that you have a book", it becomes Er sieht, dass du ein Buch hast.

The "that you have a book" is subordinate clause -- one that can't stand alone and which is joined to the main clause "he sees" with the conjunction "that" dass.

Subordinate clauses in German always have the conjugated verb at the end -- thus the subordinate clause is dass du ein Buch hast.

English also changes the word order sometimes, in particular when turning direct questions into indirect questions: "What do you have in that box?" cannot become "I want to know what do you have in that box." but has to be "I want to know what you have in that box." And "Why is my sentence not accepted?" becomes not "I want to know why is my sentence not accepted" but "I want to know why my sentence is not accepted".

February 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarieBerry5

Correct

February 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nickson984385

Warum er benut( dass) aber nicht das!!

March 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mwalek

I would really appreciate a simple explanation for why hast is at the end here. Why not: "Er sieht, dass du hast ein Buch"? Thanks.

April 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

dass starts a subordinate clause.

Subordinate clauses always have the verb at the end.

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mwalek

Your explanation is simple and it makes a lot of sense. Thanks a lot! I also noticed that you answered this question already above, sorry there's too many comments on here. I now really appreciate the work you do as a moderator. Vielen Dank!

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julie260479

still don't understand when to use das or dass

April 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girlcatlove1524

"Dass" is a conjunction here. You'd use 'dass' for conjunctions. However, you'd use 'das' for a general statement. Ex. Das ist ein Buch.

May 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

das is also a relative pronoun: ein Buch, das ich geschrieben habe. (a book that I have written)

May 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julie260479

danke

May 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelikaku

The voice on this one is so
garbled that even on the
slow speed it is impossible
to hear what the dude is
talking about.

בס״ד

June 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thanuja8

Can i say this sentence as "Dass du ein Buch hast, sieht er"

July 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Can i say this sentence as "Dass du ein Buch hast, sieht er"

Grammatically, it's fine.

But it would be an unusual word order, unless you are contrasting it with seeing something else -- e.g. Dass du ein Buch hast, sieht er, aber nicht, dass du auch eine Zeitung hast. "He sees that you have a book but not that you also have a newspaper".

Putting dass du ein Buch hast at the beginning would usually be used to make it into the topic of the sentence -- "As for 'you have a book': he sees that [but not something else]"

July 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aarav657573

Thx

August 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aarav657573

Key

August 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avery_Eubanks

What’s with the comma after “er sieht”? Also, is “dass” a subordinating conjunction, like why does hast go to the end of the clause? I know that subordinating conjunctions put the verb of that clause to the end.

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What’s with the comma after “er sieht”?

Subordinate clauses are set off with a comma in German. This includes all relative clauses (both restrictive and non-restrictive).

Also, is “dass” a subordinating conjunction

Yes.

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ronaldosantana01

I don't know about you guys, but I find it very difficult to learn German. It seems I will never memorize all this vocabulary and grammar rules. Heeelp!!!

November 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cgottsch

just keep at it!

December 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CameronAvocado

is that yukko for your profile pic

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christianYETI

you'll get it eventually!

March 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuFan0

The only way to increase is to move on every day, even just few steps. That's how I learn German. Hope you can success.

January 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Odinkin

German needs its word order fixed the way English did.

May 27, 2016
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