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  5. "Hago queso."

"Hago queso."

Translation:I make cheese.

January 5, 2013

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/godisadinosaur

I hope to be able to say this someday with a straight face.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ricaloca

Well, I have a good recipe for a basic mozarella...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claychampion

A kind of cheese :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregMo72

Yeah, first thing that came to my mind is, "I cut the cheese".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heather.ba1

i know, i actually was trying to say it and it let me go with i make cheese... ummm, meant to ACTUALLY say it in spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rachyb638

I know right, cheese making sounds intriguing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gismon

blessed are the cheesemakers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yarjka

I think it refers to any manufacturers of dairy products.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pjalig

would "i am making cheese" work in this context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NYY24

That would be "(Estoy) haciendo queso."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluJai

I just tried "I'm making cheese" and it was marked incorrect. So I guess not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitaine56

pjalig- hago is present tense, indicative. estoy haciendo is, I am making cheese, which means, at this moment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/buffalump21

my question too :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rachyb638

Wow, duolingo knows so much- even things i didnt even know myself. For instance-- i make cheese and own a turtle!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raquel962457

Haha! I found out that I'm a penguin :-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosiahWalker

I thought she said algo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nj.ridder

Why is "I make cheese" correct here and not "I prepare cheese"? If I recall correctly prepare was used for other example questions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitaine56

nj.ridder- you prepare a meal and you prepare a chicken before roasting it. The cheese doesn't exist yet, you're gonna make it. You can't prepare something that you don't have.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ImpInTraining

What if the cheese does exist, and it is your task to set it on a plate for consumption?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitaine56

implntraining- If someone says , I prepare cheese, for me it implies that they prepare or set a plate of cheese, we prepare a meal not cheese. Those who make cheese, it starts with milk and cream, as in a farm, they make it. Setting cheese on a plate isn't making cheese, it's already made.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ImpInTraining

Don't get me wrong. I'm sure "Hago Queso" meaning 'I make cheese' is fine. I'm just saying there is no reason why it couldn't mean 'I prepare cheese' as well. Both are valid English statements. It didn't accept 'I prepare cheese' as a valid answer, and I object to that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/goopach

In other places hago was used to mean prepare and make. they are not really the same but dl used it that way. I will write down where it was prepare next time I see it. I have made cheese. and it does seem like making cheese should be OK too!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitaine56

goopach- of course sometimes, you can use, prepare, for a meal for exemple. In the duo sentence, maybe the person who makes cheese works in a place where they make and sell cheese. There's no context. He can prepare a plate of cheese, but not the cheese itself, he has to make it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tosh72

Qué tal, "corto el queso"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juana8880

corto and hago is different


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaisaliIla

Holy crap, I can make cheese?! O_o


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juana8880

Yo corto queso (I cut cheese) and Yo hago queso (I make cheese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akdoo

Why no "I" here.. ?? Yo hago queso = wrong.. ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlkSquad

Because the latter part of the verb changes based on the pronoun, hago is the same as saying yo hago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthiasBladou

Spanish is pro-drop which means you can choose to have an overt pronoun or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitaine56

akdoo- no, it's ok.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjstallworth

Can someone please explain why "I am making cheese" is incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitaine56

mjstall- Because it would be : estoy haciendo queso.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaliLoorem

Duo lingo has multiple talents


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexFinesse

Out of curiosity, do native Spanish speakers find "queso" as inherently funny as English speakers find "cheese"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ApeMan2

Make cheese not accepted why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitaine56

apeman- because make cheese without the subject pronoun is imperative. (yo) hago is indicative present tense. An order would be : haz queso, (for tú, informal)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pawan1899

Hago means 'i ask' no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ImpInTraining

Hago = I do ... From the root 'hacer'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iyer_Rohit

What is the difference between making out the cheese, and Making the cheese???????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheAwesomeClair

how do I say cake?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickJohnst8

Hago queso means i did cheese, or i make cheese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unkownx

So hago means ask or make ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unkownx

The question b4 that hago came as ask and that came as make so which one is it ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Atokirina

That's what he said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielDayot

I am making cheese is wrong? But this is present tense. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmevans04

For some reason it wouldn't pick up my voice whenever I said queso. I just spent a minute shouting queso to my laptop before giving up.

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