"Det er et hotell på stranden."

Translation:There is a hotel on the beach.

3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/blaeksbiofor

the Danube beach in Novi Sad, Serbia is locally called "strand". think it's austro-hungarian/german influence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliveraMicic

da, to je i meni bila prva asocijacija ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Balazs_77
Balazs_77
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We use the word "strand" for beaches by lakes, rivers and seas as well in Hungary, right.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/__milja__

Pa najlakše je zapamtiti štrand hahahah

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria540388

Strand for beach is not unknown in English (my dictionary calls the usage literary) and strand is used for beach in Scotland, too.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christhroup
christhroup
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I was told I had a typo because I wrote "a hotel" instead of "an hotel". Both are correct (but not at the same time!) as some English dialects pronounce the 'h' and others don't.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan.S47
Evan.S47
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In American English, it can only be "a" because hotel does not begin with a vowel, nor is it an exception. Dialect is irrelevant here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christhroup
christhroup
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It's the starting sound, not the written letter, which determines whether one should use 'a' or 'an'.

In some English dialects (not my own), the 'h' sound is dropped so one would say "an (h)otel" as we have a leading vowel sound from the 'o'.

In other dialects (such as my own) the 'h' sound is pronounced, so one would say "a hotel" because of the leading consonant sound.

I say dialect instead of accent - of this I may be incorrect - because persons from either group may still pronounce the 'h' at the beginning of other words.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan.S47
Evan.S47
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Healthy debate. In the North America, we are taught the proper way to say words like hotel with "h". Dropping letters because of accent or dialect may be acceptable within a community, but isn't proper or correct. I am trying to rack my brain of any words we us "an" for which does not start with vowel. Interesting to think about how we adjust based on how a culture may pronounce certain words.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christhroup
christhroup
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It may surprise you to learn that the "an (h)otel" trait is heavily associated with the upper, traditionally more educated classes in England. As I said, not my people! Heavily influenced by the French style, I believe.

May I offer up "herb" as a word which is always pronounced with the 'h' in English dialects (so therefore "a herb") but is frequently pronounced without the 'h' (ie "an (h)erb") in North America. At least, that's what imported TV leads us to understand.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan.S47
Evan.S47
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Tis true. We do keep the "h" silent in (h)erbs here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JenniferTauber

The word that I most commonly hear with 'an' despite starting with a consonant is 'historic' (e.g. 'an historic occasion'). I particularly associate it with British RP, but a lot of newsreaders here in Australia say it too. I definitely associate it with posh dialects.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvikernes

ive never heard of anyone dropping the h from hotel, "a hotel" is what is taught because of the reason stated above

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phinoo1414
phinoo1414
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strand is a fem. or masc. word, both are admitted. So the definite can be either stranden or stranda (the beach)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phoenix1494

Yes

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Moongrovenly

I just wanted to chime in, since previous discussion above or below seems not to have affected this yet, that if it's within their powers the mods could adjust this sentence to allow "a" or "an" equally so that "a" would not be marked as a typo. It's definitely not a typo in American English, in which both forms are accepted but "an" comes across as stuffy, excessively proper, or foreign.

1 month ago
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