"Meine Batterie ist leer."

Translation:My battery is dead.

October 15, 2015

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lulubeck

Drained, flat, used up, empty, spent, run down, dead, etc. Maybe we should ask the battery how she feels.

January 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SelmiRose

i dont know why i find this funny

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RogerioBL

Isnt "empty" the best translation for "leer"?

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

Yes, in general. But we usually describe batteries as "dead"--not "empty."

October 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Or "flat". (Maybe this is a UK thing? Or simply a pre-smartphone-generation term?)

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

Yep, that's British. As an American, I've never heard "flat" used that way.

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Truerepentance

As an Australian, I have heard and used 'flat', 'dead' and 'empty' to describe batteries. :P

January 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkSchad

Yeah, we're pretty scrappy with words!

April 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tedhaubrich

So in US anyway we typically misuse battery to mean a battery of 'cells' even if there is only one cell. Sounds like they do in Germany too, but what does akku translate to litterally?

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tedhaubrich

Ahh, found it. Accumulater, makes sense now.

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, "eine Batterie" is what most people call a single cell as well. (I don't think I've ever heard just "Zelle", though, but instead specify the size, e.g. "Mignonzelle" for an AA cell, "Monozelle" for C, etc.)

der Akku < der Akkumulator is used for rechargeable ones, accumulators.

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yadwinder_gadari

Indians call a large torch "Battery", lol. But cells are called cells.

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OneAndOnlyJosh

Would "leer" be used in other contexts to say something or someone is dead?

Der Mann ist leer. Mein Gerät ist leer. Meine Liebe ist leer.

January 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schmidzy

No, "leer" doesn't literally translate to "dead." This sentence is a bit idiomatic in both languages: in German, you say your battery is empty, and in English you say it is dead.

January 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George_Melons

If I'm not wrong, what you're looking for is "Tot" as in, "Du bist tot! Tot." or "Er ist tot.", as far as I'm concerned you should basically just use "Leer" as "Empty" since that's a bit more fitting.

If there's any native Germans or generally anyone more experienced with German let me know if I'm wrong on that.

January 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewMull10

i thought it was Akku rather than Batterie?

October 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/igelchen

It depends. Akkus are rechargable, Batterien aren't (unless they're in cars or something). But this sounds like the speaker is talking about their mobile phone, in which case it would of course be Akku. Both should definitely be acceptable.

October 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margusoja

To be exact - an element is a single charged unit and a battery is a combined charged unit consisting of several elements. A battery can be rechargeable as well and non-rechargeable. But you are right that Akku is a rechargeable battery.

January 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Problemzerstorer

"Akkustand ist sehr niedrig". -my telephone

February 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yadwinder_gadari

Can I say "Meine Batterie ist tot" ?

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flor.herz

Why not my battery is low

January 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That means, for me, "there is not much electricity left in my battery". Or in other words: "there is electricity in my batter, but not very much of it".

But if your battery is "leer" (literally: "empty"), then there is no electricity at all left.

January 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flor.herz

oh thank you ! have a lingot

January 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamaicarose2

As a Californian, I've never heard "flat" used for a completely drained battery

December 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jasonwill3

What was wrong with "my battery is out"

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lulubeck

I've never heard anyone say that in English.

October 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lulubeck

How about, "My battery has run down"?

October 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrDemetr

Would "my battery is flat" be accepted?

November 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

yes it worked for me

December 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skeelesirma

my battery is flat should also be accepted as it is correct English

December 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It is now.

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickVroman

You can translate it as "My battery is drained", right?

January 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fridelain

Wir haben laden unser Batterie...

April 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BekahBelle

Are there any native Germans or somebody who currently lives/has lived in Germany who can tell me if this is the most common way of saying a dead battery?

August 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bata989

I was learned on my German class that this is empty ,dead would be kaput?

February 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Leer" generally does mean "empty." But the standard way to say that a battery is used up is "leer." It's not a word-for-word translation; English and German use different words to express this idea. (Though "battery is empty" is actually fine in English, too, just less common.)

"Kaputt" (note spelling) would mean "broken," and it would mean that the battery was physically cracked or damaged somehow.

February 16, 2018
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