"Außerdem wird es morgen Regen geben."

Translation:There will be rain tomorrow anyway.

November 13, 2013

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bikebreaker

Ausserdem also has the meaning "apart from that" which is different.

December 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackYakov

"anyway it will be rainy tomorrow" should be accepted

June 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElleLingo

But that changes it to an adjective.

May 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michaelo19

"Außerdem" feels like the English expression for "other than that", as in "I eat and sleep. But other than that, I'm spending too many hours a day on DuoLingo." Does Außerdem work in that case, or is there another phrase for it?

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bikebreaker
November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ringcycle

Außerdem is pretty close to the Spanish word además. So if you know what that means, that can help.

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shifudoc

außerdem = moreover, so why is it marked wrong in this translation?

March 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReinerSelb

should be better than anyway anyway :)

November 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/collectedsoul

'It rained yesterday' would be 'Gestern hat es Regen gegeben'? The give format is necessary to describe rain?

January 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bikebreaker

Geben is part of "es gibt", meaning "there is". In this case, we are talking about the future so werden is used, here conjugated "es wird". Altogether this gives "Es wird Regen geben" = "There will be rain". The past tense equivalent would be "Es gab gestern Regen" or "Gestern gab es Regen" = "There was rain yesterday" Your sentence "Gestern hat es Regen gegeben" make sense but I doubt that anyone would say that. They seem to generally use "Es gab" for "There was".

February 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/labinsky

Es regnete

February 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greenfire315

Can außerdem also mean "despite that"?

November 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aalzateg

despite that = trotzdem

November 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/denamyte

I think, außerdem rather means 'in addition', 'also', 'with it', 'as well', there is no any opposition to something as it is in 'despite that'.

September 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PushythePirate1

'anyway' isn't in the possibilities for Ausserderm (I don't know how to make the letter on my keyboard). I put in 'It will rain tomorrow also' and it was marked wrong. 'Also' is given as one of the translations for Ausserderm.

November 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PushythePirate1

it accepted 'It will also rain tomorrow' when it came up again (since I got it 'wrong' the first time)

November 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/breezeinfl

to me it sounds like a question and I answered it " anyway, will it rain tomorrow" of course it was marked wrong and I don't quite get it.

June 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bikebreaker

It sounds like a question because "wird" comes before "es" - "Wird es morgen Regen geben?" is a question. But here the reason "wird" comes before "es" is because "Außerdem" is first and the verb must be second.

June 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/breezeinfl

thanks for the explanation but my head still thinks the correct way to write the german sentence is "Ausserdem,es wird morgen Regen geben. To mean in English " it will rain tomorrow anyway.

June 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bikebreaker

Yeah, I know. That's just one of the things you have to get used to if you are an English speaker learning German. The verb comes second. "Morgen, wird es Regen geben." "Gestern, hat es Regen gegeben."

June 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sack11
  • 1437

What is the use of geben here.? Can it just be Außerdem wird es morgen Regen?

August 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bikebreaker

"Es gibt" - "it gives" is just how you say "there is" in German.

August 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sack11
  • 1437

Thanks for explaining that :)

August 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bikebreaker

I suddenly see that you want to use Regen as a verb. "regnen" is, in fact, a verb so you could definitely say "Morgen, regnet es." and I think this is more common usage. So altogether, "Außerdem, wird es morgen regnen" or "Außerdem, regnet es morgen." (using the present tense to indicate the future).

November 25, 2014
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