https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia

Windows keyboard layout for language lovers

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Hello dear all,

Following a discussion posted in the Spanish section, I though it might be interesting to share with those who do not already know that there is a "magic" keyboard layout in Windows that will save you the trouble of learning a new layout for every language you learn. (Or weird-complicated characters combinations.)

It is the US INTERNATIONAL layout, or US INTL. You will be able to type many special characters using just AltRight: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:KB_US-International.svg

From what I've seen, it covers at least English, French, Spanish, German, Italian, Portuguese. (Not East European languages though.)

On how to install it: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306560

Hope this helps those in need!

5 years ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pont
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It's handy (I've been using it as my default keyboard layout for years) but can be a bit slow, since multiple keypresses are required for some languages. In the long run I find that learning the native layout is worth the time invested.

From what I've seen, it covers at least English, French, Spanish, German, Italian, Portuguese. (Not West European languages though.)

I think that it does actually cover all major western European languages. In fact, the US International layout on Linux also covers a lot of the Latin-alphabet central and eastern European languages -- for example I can get the Czech háček and the Swedish å. But from the file you linked, it seems that Windows doesn't offer quite such a range.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia
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Actually I find it easier, mostly because my native language is French and the layout is very different from the English/Spanish one (azerty vs qwerty). Before, every time I switched, I had to think about the position of the letters, as they obviously don't show up on my keyboard; Now I just have to type 2 keys instead of one, It might be "slower" but it requires less thinking ;-) (I must admit I pushed it as far as buying a laptop with US layout so I wouldn't have to think about anything anymore.) Plus, even if you do learn the letters, you still won't be able to find easily the other keys like @, !, +... and you'll have to re-switch to your "native" keyboard.

Yes, I saw Linux does, but Windows unfortunately not - and I corrected my sentence, I meant "East European" :-( which makes me really sad as I also use the Polish layout, so I had to learn that one too... qwertz, close to qwerty, but still!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
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It's true, US-international is much easier in general though it limits your top speed -- and especially so if you are not a touch-typist. My physical keyboard is actually an Italian one, but I don't look at it much so it doesn't cause problems.

I started French on Duolingo last month, and AZERTY is definitely the hardest Latin layout for me... I am getting used to it now but the first few days were pretty painful :).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia
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Well, I guess I don't type as fast as you do, and I'm not a touch-typist, so I admit it doesn't slow me down all that much :-)

5 years ago
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