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  5. "Die Kinder sind laut."

"Die Kinder sind laut."

Translation:The children are loud.

October 16, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skyjo77

Who was not noisy as a child? Wer war als Kind nicht laut?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dickruz

Wouldn't you say 'als ein kind'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skyjo77

Basically you are right, but in this context (in this word order), it sounds a little unnatural or "overemphasized", if you will; which is related to the article.
In addition, "als Kind" means/includes the entire childhood > "als Kind" = 1. "als ich ein Kind war." / 2. "in einer/meiner Kindheit" > "as a child" = 1. "when I was a child" / 2. "in someone's / my childhood".
Which is thus only a shorter substantivized form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theguy07

adults are also loud


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.b.e.e.

... which is why i'm not having any!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mimawbaubo

Truer words have never been spoken


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shavo333

How do you say The children are LOUDER?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/halterlein

Die Kinder sind lauter als mich. The children are louder than me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Komeo

It should be: "Die Kinder sind lauter als ich."

The explanation -- I can think of -- is, "als" is in this case a conjunction which precedes a shortened relative clause: "Die Kinder sind lauter als ich es bin". So the pronoun in question has the function of a subject, that's why it should be in nominative.

(Please correct me, if i made any mistakes)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrioLinguist

I don't know why this person is being downvoted. S/he's absolutely correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poojasangh2

Why would es come after Ich?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmo-pedant

I have the same question as poojasangh2. What does the "es" do?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PopSixSquish

What if the comparison is between periods of time - the children are louder than before?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Same. Die Kinder sind lauter als vorher.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shavo333

Thanks for answering. So the "er" at the end of the word makes it loudER also in german? (of course I believe for some words) And can you just say louder as if you were ansewring the question.. "Who is louder?". Re: Die Kinder sind lauter (without als mich) ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, that's right -- -er forms the comparative in German as in English (lautER = loudER), and die Kinder sind lauter = the children are louder.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dickruz

I think you'd say "wer ist lauter?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_Sesquipedalian

Mein Bruder ist sehr laut.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterParah

Does German have distinct adjectives for loud and noisy? Or is it all 'laut'? Loud describes the sound as having high amplitude. Noisy is not precisely defined, but typically refers to sounds extended in duration. For example, an air horn deployed near your ear would be loud, whereas a dog that's been barking for the last two hours is noisy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmuraofJupiter

How would you say: "Children are too loud" As in referring to children in general?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FancyPirate10

Kinder sind zu laut.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

die is used before feminine nouns and also before plural nouns.

Here, it's used because Kinder is plural.

(There is no gender distinction in the plural in German -- all nouns take die in the plural regardless of whether they are masculine, feminine, or neuter in the singular.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saeed916005

Why the 《noisy》is not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The answer "noisy" is not correct because it is just one adjective. It does not translate the sentence Die Kinder sind laut.

You have type more words, such as "The children are noisy."

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