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"Tu pantalón"

Translation:Your pants

5 years ago

65 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Roseablex

I thought "pants" was always plural like "pantalones." Can it be singular too like this?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/endless-blue

If you check the word "pants" in a dictionary, you will probably find only "pantalones" in plural. However the native spanish speakers often say "pantalón" to refer to the same thing. It definitely isnt incorrect. You can say, for example: "Me gustan tus pantalones" o "Me gusta tu pantalón" and it means the same.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynner1414

That makes sense, but then why did DL include a question that is intended to make the distinction between pantlon and pantalones?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arjunv27

I think it's about recognizing the difference between tu and tus, and the corresponding pluralization of the noun.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zdurr22

^ F DL

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neet
neet
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I think Pantalón means a pair of pants and Pantalónes means pairs of pants. In many languages pants are singular.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

neet- you are wrong for pantalones, it doesn't mean many pairs. And pantalones, loses the S on O. because the stress goes over lo, so no need to put the accent, thats the rule.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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You are correct. There's no longer a need for an accent because with the added syllable, the -lo- syllable is now penultimate and naturally gets the stress.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

holyt- I see that I wrote that pantalones lose the S for plural, of course you understood what I said, I meant that there's no need to put the acc ent. I didn't see that I wrote that., it was a distraction of course.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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Yes, I think I understand you. I was just restating what you said, which I agreed with. Thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mdcooper
mdcooper
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I had the same thought. hmmm?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martine93
Martine93
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That's what I thought too... It says your pant is a correct answer as well, but you wouldn't use it in singular in english either.. Or so I thought

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuncanCV

No, you would NEVER say 'a pant' in English, unless you were being silly.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whit1016

actually, we do use pant in english, but not in layman's terms. in retail and fashion, they do refer to a singular pair of pants as "a pant" or "the pant."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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"Pant" is also used in the singular as a noun adjunct (modifier), as in "pant leg" or "pant shorts."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

Wow, I never knew this! (Of course, how would I! :)) Thanks for this little info, whit1016! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

duncan-maybe not in English but in French and Spanish, yes.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esgerman12
esgerman12
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And German, yes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hwajune5834

My native language use a singular form to refer to a pair of pants too

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dwayne_Dang

In Vietnamese language, we use "pant" to indicate "a pair of pants" and add numbers before "pant" to show the quantity of "pants", e.g. 1 "pant" (1 "cái quần"), 2 "pants" (2 "cái quần"), etc. Same rule applies to Chinese (though I'm not sure about Japanese and Korean).

So far, English is the only language I've known that always uses the noun "pant" in its plural form "pants".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goopach

what is your native language?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

hwajune5834, does you native language happen to be Korean? Sorry if I'm assuming; it's the nickname you use, and I miss my Korean friends. Thanks. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DXabier
DXabier
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Yes, it can. Pantalón is singular and pantalones is plural

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ebbaasghar

No In my Spanish class, we've learnd that Pants is like a plural already (maybe cause it covers both legs) so pantalon is wrong... Pantalones is the word

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

And when they have both the 'singular' and plural words for things in Spanish, you just have to respect that and follow the rules of that language, rather than insist on the rules in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

ebbaasghar, "pants" is plural, IN ENGLISH; it always carries a plural Verb in English. In SPANISH though, they say differently; they have "pantalón" and they have "pantalones", which you also have to get your possessive adjective and verb to agree with.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

ebba- Wrong. As in French, pantalón can be singular.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sydzik

It can easily be used if you're referring to a single pant leg as well, as in "My pant leg is torn."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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Indeed. In that case, "pant" is a noun adjunct, aka noun modifier.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phaytle

This sounds perfectly fine... if you have one leg. "Honey, put on your pant before you hop off to work!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DrazenVazler

The pants are plural in English even thought it is just a single piece of clothing. A shirt also has two arms but it is singular.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

Shirts have "sleeves", so we almost always say "roll up your sleeves" :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esgerman12
esgerman12
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Almost always is still not always.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JJBurggraa

XD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baltipal

Pants mean something different here in the UK.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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You mean knickers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jack_Charlton

Could you write "Su pantalon" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosalynFae

yes, if the person you were speaking to is not someone you are familiar with. Su and Tu are the same, just one is familiar and one is not

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Naylor1993
Naylor1993
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¿Es que en España se usa 'tus pantalones' en vez de 'tu pantalón'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeviWiles

Why do they call it a pair of pants if you only have one? (Joke)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JJBSS

doesn't tu have an accent mark

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greatlanguages
greatlanguages
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Tu with an accent means You and is the noun in a sentence. Tu without an accent means "your" and is the pronoun before a noun. Clear?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

gratlanguages, you're wrong with 2 things. Tú is a pronoun, not a noun, and most of the time is a subject. Tu, as in this sentence, is a possessive adjective, not a pronoun.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goopach

ty mitaine

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankenstein724
frankenstein724
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A pronoun is merely a special kind of noun, so no mistake there.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

frank- a pronoun is a pronoun and have different functions than the noun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankenstein724
frankenstein724
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Um, it's function is specifically act like a noun in the place of one. Rectangles and squares, my friend, all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares. And it's not that "Tú" "most of the time is a subject", it is -always- a subject. If the 2nd person singular informal is not a subject, it is either "te" or "ti".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

Frank. I agree for the part "most of the time" but I think that saying that a pronoun is a noun can be confusing for a new learner. A pronoun, at least in French is called a pronoun, and a noun is called a noun. When children at school do analysis of a sentence, they learn that the pronoun takes place of a noun or of a part of a sentence. If they think that the pronoun is a noun, they could be confused because a noun has an article and the pronoun agree with the verb. That was my point, it's better to say the correct names, at least at first when they start to learn.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankenstein724
frankenstein724
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right, a pronoun is called a pronoun, and a noun is called a noun, in English as well. nouns also agree with verbs, even in French. If I said "les hommes" I would say "mangent" just like I would if I said "ils", whereas if I said "l'homme", I would say "mange' just like I would if I said "il", etc. But in both cases (nouns and pronouns) only agree with the verb if they are subjects (generally), if nouns or pronouns are objects, they won't agree with the verb in many languages. Also, not all nouns manifest themselves with articles, sometimes they can't have an article, even.

I know you know that, but that's just the point, if we are going to start talking about what may or may not confuse a learner, let's make sure that we are being as accurate as possible. If something is slightly confusing, it can be explained.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

Frank- I totally agree with your third comment.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JJBSS

Thanks!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/3piggies

Why couldn't both answers be correct? Tu pantalon (one pair of pants) or tu pantalones (more than one pair of pants)?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kerimiller

I think I get this... .but when WOULD you use the word 'pantalones'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

kerimiller- In the same occasions of using pantalón : voy a llevar mis pantalones mañana, I'll wear my pants tomorrow, voy a llevar mi pantalón mañana. My explanation would be easier to understand in French, because in English, the translation is only my pants, but in French, we say mon pantalon or mes pantalons, sing and plural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TundR

Where are my pantttttts?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SikoyaRich

It can go either.way

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KirBirger

Why is pantalones incorrect here? By all accounts from posters here, they should be interchangeable

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Francesca_Swim

Tú=you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Francesca_Swim

Tú means u

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyoMikara

What about my pants?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusty325699
Dusty325699
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In english the reference to pants is mostly done as plural. When I first took Spanish i was told this is the case as well (like vacaciones is always plural) - is this a mistake in DL or do they really want it translated as a single "pant"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mayabelize

I thought it was always "PANTALONES"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dot.Comm
Dot.Comm
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How are you to know whether it's one pair of slacks or two pairs? There is no indications.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheepLikeOnions

why is it not plural?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JacksonRom6

shouldn't the conjugation be es/as

1 year ago