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"Ich mag meine Verwandten."

Translation:I like my relatives.

2 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bogg22

Hu, a minute ago relatives was Verwandte??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimoneBa
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This is the accusative case now, which changes the endings. The verb "mögen" triggers the accusative.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tor_Heyerdal
Tor_Heyerdal
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But just a minute ago, Duo gave me "Hast du Verwandte?" That's accusative too. What's going on here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amaslac
amaslac
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It's an adjectival noun which means it's declined as an adjective. http://www.canoo.net/inflection/verwandte:N:F

It was the same thing with "Erwachsene" in some earlier lesson.

I learned the adjective endings here: http://www.nthuleen.com/teach/grammar/adjektivendungenexpl.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tor_Heyerdal
Tor_Heyerdal
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I'm definitely familiar with the adjective endings already, thanks to the charts in the tips area of the colours section here on Duolingo. But I did not realize that words such as these were being treated as adjectives, inflectionally. It all makes sense now. Thanks a lot.

For anyone who may be stumbling upon this thread and is also having problems with this concept, here's a page I found with much more information that may help:

https://www.dartmouth.edu/~german/Grammatik/AdjectivalNouns/AdjectivalNouns.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmes
Mesmes
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OK but why doesn't Duo teach declension of adjectives first then? :D

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elilla.b
elilla.b
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…sagte niemand niemals.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoIngTheThing
DuoIngTheThing
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Does the "d" in the word "Verwandten" sound like a "t"? I can't really tell since there's "t" following the "d".

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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The -dt- together makes a single /t/ sound in this word.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapnDoug

Thanks, great explanation.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marky777Mark

I think that this sentence is NOT true for most people....

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertoHer876128

Some more than others

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoseLoretoRomero

I am really confused by this one. Ich mag meine Verwandten on one hand but Meine Tanten und Neffen sind verwandte on the other hand?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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verwandt "related" is an adjective, and when it's used as a noun in the sense of "relative", it still inflects like an adjective.

So it's Verwandte (strong inflection, -e ending) on its own but die Verwandten (weak inflection, -en ending since die has the -e ending) and meine Verwandten (mixed inflection, -en ending since meine has the -e ending).

Similarly, ein Verwandter but der Verwandte for "a/the (male) relative".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mnarhins
mnarhins
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I went with "I like my kin". Does it mean something different in English, or is it just somehow dodgy English? Please help me out on this, English is not my first language!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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It's not dodgy, but it is uncommon English. "kin" is not a word that is used much in today's English, outside of some fixed expressions such as "next of kin".

The usual word for Verwandte is "relatives".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapnDoug

Kin is "mountain" English, mostly only used by those who live in a remote and somewhat isolated region (Appalachia) of the US. However, pretty much everyone would understand what you meant if or when it was used the way you used it. And it does mean relatives, so I wouldn't count it as wrong but as Mizi says it is just not common.

7 months ago