"Die Mäuse"

Translation:The mice

October 17, 2015

30 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ououasnnauau

It might be just my terrible built-in speakers, but Mäuse in this case could have been nearly anything. Does anyone else thinks it comes through unusually fuzzy? No pun intended. :)

October 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scarvbarv

Sounds like moy-zah to me.

November 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/friswing

Yes, i heard and wrote 'Die Häuser' (houses). Computer voices aren't always as clear as we wish

October 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emilysylvia

yes, I wrote "die Leute". normally don't have trouble but today hasn't been good

May 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manuel822459

Sounds like moy zeh

October 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, "äu" sounds like "oy". "Moy-zuh" might be even closer since final -e is a centralised "shwa" sound.

October 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/otsogutxi

Are all plural nouns 'die'?

January 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes :)

(At least in the nominative and accusative cases.)

January 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/otsogutxi

Thanks!

January 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alyebrahee

so what's the difference between mouse and mice ?

January 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"mouse" is the singular form. You use it when there is exactly one mouse. In German: "Maus". (eine Maus = one mouse / a mouse)

"mice" is the plural form. You use it when there is more than one mouse. "two mice, three mice, many mice". (Also sometimes when there is no mouse at all: "there are no mice here".) In German: "Mäuse". (zwei Mäuse, drei Mäuse, viele Mäuse; keine Mäuse)

January 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_na7

Do German umlauts have a specific pronunciation in different cases?

March 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The letter combination äu is a bit special; like eu, it is pronounced like oi or oy.

For example, heute (today) or Häute (skins) are pronounced identically and have roughly the vowel sound of "boy" in the first syllable.

March 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_na7

Thanks!

March 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ilois

Why plural of maus is mäuse? Which rule was used? Is It the first one? We added-e becouse the noun is one- sylabe? Why is there added two dots above a? Can someone explain me that?

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I don't think there are rules for forming plurals in German, just tendencies. So it's best to learn each word together with its plural as it's usually impossible to guess correctly.

So the reason why Germans say eine Maus, zwei Mäuse is because their parents did so, and they did so because their parents did so. There's probably a reason behind it which is regular but it'll be several hundreds if not thousands of years ago.

After all, why is it "one mouse, two mice" in English, which also changes the vowel? Why not "one mouse, two mouses" like we say "one house, two houses"?

It just is.

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

Well put! And I'd say it's that way in English because it's that way in German. Also, in certain dialects of English, the long I is commonly pronounced "oy".

June 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardPass

So, object that is plural should be started with "die" ?

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

If it is definite, then yes.

So, roughly speaking: if it has "the" in English and it's plural, it will have "die" in German, if it is the subject or object of a sentence.

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindieMM

Okay, so Mäuse can mean "mice", "dough", or "bread." Is there a reason for this? Mice and bread are two very different things!

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"Mäuse" is a slang word for "money" in German.

"dough" and "bread" are slang words for "money" in English.

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindieMM

Thank you! I'm American so I did see the bread relation, but I do have the dough!

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FLchick

This is a stick-up. Gimme your Mäuse.

May 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cocacolakid

I put mice and that's wrong? It can be both the mice and mice surely

December 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No - in general, where English uses the article, German uses it as well. (There are some exceptions, especially around abstractions or generalisations, but the rule holds pretty well as a rule of thumb.)

And don't call me Shirley :)

December 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pedrohgmuniz

Should "the rats" be accepted? Or is there a significant difference in this context between "mice" and "rats"?

January 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, there is a significant difference.

They are both murines (subfamily Murinae), but mice (die Maus, Mäuse) are genus Mus and rats (die Ratte, Ratten) are genus Rattus. (The best-known mouse is the common house mouse Mus musculus; the best-known rats are the black rat, Rattus rattus and the brown rat, Rattus norvegicus.

They are usually kept separate in both English and German, in my experience; confusing them might be like confusing horses and donkeys, or dogs and wolves -- and those are the same genus (horse/donkey) or even the same species in the same genus (dog/wolf)!

January 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katie.hudson3

I was taught that the plural for mice was something different. Is there more than one way for spelling the plural?

May 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FLchick

There is no plural for mice. Mice is the plural of mouse.

May 25, 2016
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