"İki saat sonra uyanmanı istiyorum."

Translation:I want you to wake up in two hours.

3 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Bogo.31
Bogo.31
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Why uyanmanı? :) :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salih_Dz.

UyanmaN is your waking. Plus accusative (I) which is there due to the verb istemek...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mohanad1986

In gerunds tense some time we use (yı) at the end of the word and other we use (nı) for Ex: Uyanmanı Yemeyi

when do we use (y) and when use (n) ??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SabineBergmann1
SabineBergmann1
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I am not really sure what you are asking here. uyanmak - stem=uyan (ending on a consonant) + -ma (Gerund) + -n (poss.) + -ı (Acc.) = uyanmanı (lit. your waking up) eğlenmek - stem=eğlen + -me (Gerund) + -y (buffer letter, because the "me" is ending on a vocal) + -ı (Acc.) = having fun Is it that what you mean?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magatouve
magatouve
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İ think «y» is the buffer for the accusative case, whereas «n» is the possessive suffix for the 2nd person, i.e. «your». But a better speaker of Turkish should confirm that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marmutcu

"I want you to wake up two hours later."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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"two hours later" sounds really strange in English. We do accept this, but it definitely isn't the best answer :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattttw
mattttw
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sounds perfectly normal to me

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bellapiko

Yes very normal in UK English I would say

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheridanZhoy

It all depends on context. "I want you to take a nap at four, and I want you to wake up two hours later."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bellapiko

ooh sorry Alex was just refreshing lessons then saw this, ,this is used in UK but I was born in North UK

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bellapiko

I would say that rather than in 2 hours but I am UK English!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zobristen
Zobristen
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I think we should use present continious because of istiYORum. Right?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinJohnMills
MartinJohnMills
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In English, the verb "to want" doesn't usually take the continuous form.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leichim
leichim
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So how would you say, I want to wake up two hours later than you wake up? Something like.... Uyanmandan iki saat sonra uyanmami istiyorum?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bellapiko

I want to wake up two hours later than you

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vfurmanov
vfurmanov
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Is uyanmanı constructed like this:

uyanma (gerund) + n (possessive) + ı (accusative)

If so, why is there an accusative ending.

Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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Yes! And "your waking up" is a specific noun that is also the object of a verb. You have to use the accusative because it is a specific direct object :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasperMay.
JasperMay.
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What is the difference between uyanmak and kalkmak? Could you say "kalkmanı istiyorum"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie392547
Marie392547
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I guess you will first 'uyanmak' and then 'kalkmak'.
uyanmak = to wake up
kalkmak = to get up

3 months ago
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