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"Él come de todo."

Translation:He eats anything.

4 years ago

50 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

"de todo" means 'everything' (Kind of like how "todo el mundo" is how to say "everybody")

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=107580

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkNeff727

This is true, but todo by itself means anything as well, can't fiqure why de is here

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evelyn704866

De in this case would mean of as in he eats of everything (as in all kinds of food)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mylesfranklin

Great! Thanks!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poelmeneer

that streak

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkNeff727

i commented on this a while ago! This makes sense to me now, as DE TODO, means anything, any which thing. http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/todo. Scroll down a little, it is an idiom i suppose (:

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soyragan

I think 'de todo' means 'a little bit of everything' ? http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/de%20todo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkNeff727

sí , eso sí, también puede significar (a little bit of everything) así pues Él come de todo = he eats anything/he eats a little bit of everything. Si de veras piensas en ello, son básiciamente lo mismo XD De todos modos te van a entender jeje pero da igual, se me hace que ya lo entiendes xp

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katie7511

thanks

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/teapotter

Why "de" here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

no 'de' = He eats everything.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Not sure about that since "He eats everything" is accepted anyway.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I feel like there ought to be a way to say this using cualquier that would be an even closer match for English's "anything".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marcelo.Barbosa

Maybe "él come cualquier cosa". "Ele come qualquer coisa" and "ele come de tudo" are interchangeable in portuguese, so I assume "él come cualquier cosa" can be used in Spanish as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/midmo63359

My English to Spanish dictionary does use your first suggestion.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adrian-Michael
Adrian-Michael
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It's actually the meaning of the sentence! He eats everything. So, what is the sentence actually?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It is the little word de that is significant. This sentence literally says He eats OF/FROM everything. This means there is no food he will not eat, not that he consumed every morsel there was. It means he eats anything. Now it is true as a practical matter that if we were invited to dinner and the hostess asked if my husband had any dietary restrictions I might say either He eats anything or he eats everything because in that scenario they would be considered the same, in most cases anything and everything are not synonyms at all. So in order to demonstrate to Duo that you understand the important distinction, it only accepts the more precise translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I think "de todo" is used to indicate the anything quality of todo. In other words, it is not that he is currently eating all of something or everything in sight, but rather he has no dietary restrictions, allergies, or picky-ness about food. For example your friend is bringing her boyfriend to dinner, and you ask her about what you should serve and shr says el come de todo meaning whatever you make will be something he eats.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerlucas13

Hmm... I'm confused too. "De todo" means "anything"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I think in context it's kind of like, "He'll eat stuff no matter where it comes from or what it's made of." Both of those are properties that you'd describe using "de". Esto es de México. This is from Mexico. Esto es de madera. This is made of wood.

Él come de todo. He eats { from anywhere / of any substance }.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Finally, someone answered the first question and made it understandable. Here's a lingo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manny540266

So what's the difference between "cualquier cosa" and "de todo"????

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArnasBradu

cualquier cosa = anything, everything

de todo = of everything, of all

El primero de abril es un día para bromas y chistes de todo tipo. - The first of April is a day for pranks and jokes of all kinds.

El primero de abril puedes hacer cualquier cosa porque tienes la excusa. - The first of April you can do anything because you have the excuse.

Él come de todo. ~~ He eats various type of food (made of everything).

Él come cualquier cosa. - He eats anything.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Great explanation ArnasBradu

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KLTah
KLTah
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great one. have a lingot!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanislawS

Like in French - "il mange de tout..."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. But with the French requirement for the partitive article du, the de comes a little more naturally.

1 year ago

[deactivated user]

    Why aren't the three definitions given not correct to use??

    EditDelete3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

    When you see the hover hints, it will give you a variety of definitions for that little snippet of the sentence. It is not necessarily true that every one of those definitions is appropriate in the current context, and there are rare cases where NONE of the most-common translations are appropriate to the current context. This is similar to looking up a word in a paper dictionary -- it may have several definitions, and you need to exercise some judgment to understand which one makes sense in context.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/12345679u
    12345679u
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    Kindda like me!.:)

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AwezomePozzum

    There's always one in every family!

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JaneFWallen

    I answered "he eats it all" which duoL said was wrong and that "he eats all" was a correct solution . To me they are saying the same thing but "he eats all" is not proper English.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Jenny2perros

    I said "he eats about anything" and it said that was wrong. And yet it gave a translation of de as about. Maybe "he eats about anything" is an English idiom DL doesn't recognize.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
    lynettemcwPlus
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    I think Duo's error is listing about as a valid translation. De means of or from. In the sentence you suggested about means almost, and that would be casi. The de here essentially means from. It means he eats all types of food. Without the de it would be he eats all the food (as in our eats up)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Jenny2perros

    Gracias.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
    Blas_de_Lezo00
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    It means all kinds of food, any food.

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Lingots4Luck

    HAND ME YOUR LINGOTS, CHILD (I'll give you back some luck.)

    6 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
    lynettemcwPlus
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    Si tú tengas suerte, no necesitarías ningún Lingots. Además alguien puede dar Lingots a un otro, pero nadie puede dar la suerte a un otro. Pero si tú aprendes español y puedes dar este conocimiento a un otro en estas discusiones aquí, alguien te podria dar un Lingot. En este caso, ambos tendrían suerte.

    6 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Lingots4Luck

    Ok, gracias.

    5 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut2

    I put "He eats the whole thing" and they said it was wrong.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/galbreathm

    why "de"

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
    lynettemcwPlus
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    Literally speaking the expression is He eats from everything. In other words it is not saying that he eats a lot of food, but simply he will eat any type of food (from all the food not actually all the food)

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/TheAwesomeClair

    "Everything" and "Anything" are two absolutly different things, so how are they both accepted? Do they mean different things in spanish? Would you use them in different contexts? Or is it just because spanish is more flexible?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Giz264723

    He eats all

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

    Since DuoLingo accepted 'He eats everything', why can't I say 'cada cosa'?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
    lynettemcwPlus
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    There is a difference between everything and every thing. You are using your English word sense to try to speak Spanish. Todo, when standing alone means everything.

    http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Everything%20

    Cada cosa means each/every THING. I am not sure, but if you said this to a Spanish speaking physician, he might be tempted to diagnose pica, that disease where people eat large quantities of non nutritional things like dirt or paper clips etc.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/GigiGottwald
    GigiGottwald
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    What's wrong with "He eats of everything"?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
    lynettemcwPlus
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    That is basically discernable and not actually grammatically incorrect, but that's not how it is generally said in English. It is how it is said in Spanish however. So this is one of the cases where a word for word translation is not appropriate.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/GigiGottwald
    GigiGottwald
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    Thanks for your comment, Lynette, but I can't agree with you that "He eats of everything" is not generally said in English. Think of a buffet where a number of different dishes are on offer. Along comes our fellow, and he helps himself to a little of each dish: voilà! he eats of everything!

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
    lynettemcwPlus
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    I understand the potential uses, but I would be pretty sure I have never heard anyone say it that way in my 60 plus years. Now I am the last person to ever say that almost any combination of words that has a possible meaning would never be said, but most people would just say he ate everything or at most specific he ate from everything (which also works for de). I know that if I am asked by someone whose house I am going to dinner I generally just say either I eat everything or I eat anything. No one has ever taken me literally thinking I would eat all the food in the house or that I had pica and would eat non food items. We tend to take that leap, but this is where Spanish is more specific. But as I said, it is grammatically correct and probably has been said. It would just not be common in my experience.

    1 year ago