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  5. "Uçmak istiyor musun?"

"Uçmak istiyor musun?"

Translation:Do you want to fly?

October 20, 2015

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tobithegreat

I'm not entirely sure what this sentence means. In Italian there are different words for piloting a plane, riding in a plane and what the plane is actually doing. In English the word "fly" is used for all three. I think I've only seen "uçmak" meaning riding in a plane, so I'm curious if it has either of the other meanings as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

It can have all three of those meanings. And without context, I'd simply translate the sentence as: "Vuoi volare?" ;p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ly_Mar

Isn't the transitive sense of ‘flying a plane’ (as in controlling it) translated with ‘kullanmak’?

I thought ‘uçmak’ was only used for what the passengers or the plane itself are doing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlicanAkyl

In this sentence, "fly" means "I want to be on air."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mai440922

I really confused about the meaning of musun is it means Is /Are or Does/Do?? Could u help me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ly_Mar

Neither. Or both. ‘mI’ doesn't have a univocal translation in English, it's an interrogative particle (I want to say verb, but it doesn't always behave as such), it's appended to elements in the sentence to form yes/no questions centred around that element (which means that ‘mIsIn’ can be translated with ‘are (you)?’ when added to an adjective or noun, or with ‘do (you)?’ when following a verb).

In this case, the translation requires ‘do’ because the particle is “questioning” the verb ‘to want’.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abed.otaba

In general It's an indicator for a question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryan47435765

Perhaps this is another nod to Game of Thrones - Ser Robin always wants to see people fly (through the Moon Door.)

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