"Chez toi, tu as un pantalon jaune."

Translation:At your house, you have yellow pants.

6 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dimensional_dan

I think a better hint would be: "At your place".

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"your place or mine?" = "chez toi ou chez moi ?"

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oakwood
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Chez moi, veux-tu voir mon pantalon jaune? <- Hope this is right. A bit presumptuous maybe!

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ghaith415370
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Sir what is the exact translation for this sentence ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Which sentence?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ghaith415370
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Chez toi tu as .......

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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At your house, you have...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Feferrie

Is the "s" supposed to be pronounced in Tu as ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hstudd

Isn't A chez toi the correct translation for at your house?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"chez" works alone when the situation is static.

you add another preposition either when you use an expression naturally constructed with that preposition or when a movement is meant:

  • l'église est près de chez moi (close to)
  • je vais vers chez toi (towards)
  • je pars de chez moi (from)
5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jovkaolovka

In this french sentence there is article "un". Why it is not correct if i translate it as article "a" in English?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Because in English "un pantalon" translates to "pants" (not "a pant), which is always plural.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/H112TbI
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I put.. at your house you have a yellow pants .. it was marked wrong because of the cat'a'. shall i report this

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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In English, "pants" require some extra attention. If you refer to a single item, then one would say "a pair of pants" for "un pantalon".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iboersma

Couldn't this also be translated as "For you (according to you), you have yellow pants"? From what I understand, "chez toi" can also mean "for you", depending upon the context of the sentence.

Sitesurf?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Yes, context is necessary to be sure you understand "chez toi" properly.

"chez toi, les hommes portent des pantalons jaunes ?" (= in your country/region)

"il n'y a plus d'électricité à la maison. Et chez toi ?" (= at your place)

" vraiment, il y a quelque chose qui ne va pas chez toi !" (you are crazy)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jippertje
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Why is jeans instead of pants wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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pants/un pantalon is generic to the category, like trousers

jeans/un jean is specific to a kind of pants/trousers.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TechnoBlack

Weird sentence

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CathyKimball

This has to be a leader in the competition for weirdest sentence on Duolingo!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wendy701105
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Why is 'trousers' incorrect?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/docsimsim

why 'un' when trousers are the subject which are technically plural?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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In English, trousers is technically plural but in French it is technically singular.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/docsimsim

Thanx :)

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasmine8D
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Since the translation of "Chez toi" is "At your house", this means "toi" can mean "ton" right?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Not quite.

"moi, toi, lui, (elle), soi, (nous), (vous), eux, (elles)" are stressed pronouns. Those in parentheses keep their subject pronoun form.

You have to use them (instead of the standard subject pronouns (je, tu, il, elle, on, nous, vous, ils, elles) or direct object pronouns (me, te, le, la, nous, vous, les, les), in a number of grammatical constructions:

  • after prepositions: chez toi, tu as un pantalon jaune; tu parles de moi; je viens avec toi; je parle de lui; je vais avec eux
  • in short questions and short answers: J'ai faim, et toi ? oui, moi aussi !
  • after "c'est" and "ce sont": c'est lui qui parle
  • in comparisons: elle est plus grande qu'eux
2 years ago
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