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  5. "Alles hat seinen Sinn."

"Alles hat seinen Sinn."

Translation:Everything has a reason.

January 6, 2013

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wolfadawn

"Point" is one possible translation of "Sinn", and "Everything has its point." conveys the same meaning as the acceptable answers, yet it's currently marked as wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lull0000

Hello. Is "alles" normally masculine like in this sentence, or does it depend on the context of the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mfgbkk

generally neutral/abstract like everything "alle" can be masculine or feminine or neutral (all books, all women, all men)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lull0000

OK. So if it depends on the context, what about this sentence tells us that we should use "seinen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mfgbkk

"seinen" refers to "der Sinn" which is masculine. "Alles" is the abstract subject meaning everything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1860

Are you sure? If I said " Everything has its reason", "its" would not refer to reason, it would describe reason, but refer to "everything". I would be very surprised if it were any different in German. I.e., if your logic were correct, wouldn't you then have "Die Geschichte hat seinen Sinn"? I am certain it should actually be "Die Geschichte hat ihren Sinn"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arangelovivan

Alles hat einen Sinn? is this 100% equivalent to Alles hat seinen Sinn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/borQhuester

I think "Alles hat einen Sinn" = "Everything has a reason" and "Alles hat seinen Sinn" = "Everything has its reason". The difference is subtle, but I think 'einen' has a more general feeling to it, and 'seinen' would imply a specific reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DryestDuke

Everything has his sense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1860

"Everything" is hardly a "he", certainly not in English. But beyond that I am actually lost (see my question below).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rynsmi

how does "Sinn" differ from "Grund"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reignman

why is "seinen" used here? Doesn't that mean "his"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle

As far as I fathom it, it relates to "Alles" and it means "its" -- Everything has its reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/F_a_b
  • 2286

Everything has its own meaning is wrong.. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenHueb

You've added the word "own" to your translation, while there is no "eigenen" in the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/etepaw

Am I the only one completely unable to hear the "s" in seinen??? I was sure the voice said "alles hat einen Sinn" even when listening to it carefully


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1860

German speakers: could one of you please explain why "seinen" is used here. I would understand if the sentence were "Jeder hat seinen Sinn" since "jeder" is unquestionably masculine. However "alles" is "all/everything", so I would expect it to be either plural or neuter by default.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3FtYy1cu

It seems "alles" typically goes with "sein-" (its/one's), and "alle" often goes with "ihr-" (their) but seems OK with "sein-" as well. "sein-" can be neuter and does not have to be masculine. Disclaimer - I speak only Duo-Deutsch. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bekir978479

As klang wie "Alles hat einen Sinn". Aber das hat die Gleiche Bedeutung. Oder?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bubblehobo

Just a guess, but does sein here refer to god? That sounds like it would be a German turn of phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FatAlan

Could one of the mods clear this one up please. There are at least 2 views i.e. that 'seinen' is masculine as it refers to 'der Sinn' or that seinen actually refers to alles (with no explanation of why it's masculine). I had the same question as the others but don't see any reliable/definitive answer as to why 'seinen' is used and whether it refers to 'alles' or 'der Sinn'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jelinares

what about "meaning" as a translation for Sinn. it make more sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bagoly128

Why is not the translation: Everything has its meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

This is not the meaning of "Sinn" with which I am familiar: I remember a folksong from my youth in German class:

Du, du liegst mir im Herzen.

Du, du liegst mir im Sinn...,

the singer indicating that his (unappreciative) beloved is in his heart and mind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/razuero

I believe that Sinn can also mean sense. "Es macht kein Sinn" means "It makes no sense". Right?

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