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  5. "They write."

"They write."

Translation:Loro scrivono.

January 6, 2013

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aychan219

Why do they conjugate as scrivono as opposed to scrivete?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2481

Because "scrivono" is uniquely third person plural (they) and "scrivete" is uniquely second person plural (you).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danthealmighty

what is the difference between saying "loro scrivono" and just "scrivono" since both are right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

both are equally acceptable. SInce the verb conjugation gives you already all necessary information, the personal pronoun is optional (and often left out).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bite2breakskin

Yea, from what i know from my Spanish (which is excellent for a 15 year old American teenager) the "loro" (or in Spanish, ellos/ellas) is left out 99% of the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Turtlerider

That's also absolutely true for Italian as well unless your intention is to stress the importance of the person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiannaraHe

Im really confused Is it past tense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2481

No. It is present tense. Past tense comes much later in the tree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenPitman2

I guessed ‘scribono’ and it marked it as correct, which isn’t very helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2481

You were close, but the verb is scrivere, not scribere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SonyaR16

What's the difference between scrive and scrivono


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dyno_fyre

Is this the same thing as "they are writing" or is that different?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2481

For most intents and purposes, "loro scrivono" is equally "they write" and "they are writing", 95% of the time.

You'll find the same thing in Spanish and French. They don't use the progressive aspect as much as or in the same way as we do, reserving it for something that is in the middle of happening right now ("I'm writing, so don't interrupt me") or when X was in the process of going on when Y happened ("I was writing when I heard a loud crash").

To form the present continuous in Italian, you use stare plus the present gerund, in this case "scrivendo": (loro) stanno scrivendo.
https://www.italian-verbs.com/italian-verbs/conjugation.php?parola=stare
https://www.italian-verbs.com/italian-verbs/conjugation.php?parola=scrivere

It's almost identical in Spanish. You use "estar" plus the present participle: (ellos) están escribiendo.

It's a little different in French. That takes the construction "être en train de" plus the infinitive: ils sont en train d'écrire.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KayFrancy

Scrivino wasn't an option.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2481

That's because it's scrivono, not scrivino.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juanini40889

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