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  5. "Mein Praktikum macht Spaß."

"Mein Praktikum macht Spaß."

Translation:My internship is fun.

October 23, 2015

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grammatica007

Why is practicum not accepted as a correct translation of Praktikum? A practicum, like an internship, is a supervised unpaid professional work experience.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Der-Michael

Still not accepted, reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaraTwente

Why not enjoyable, in another sentence it was the only correct answer and fun was a mistake?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hilary59668

In England a Prakticum would be an internship. Again what is so frustrating is that in one sentence you have to translate Praktikum as a Prakticum and then in the next one the translation is an internship. This is becoming more and more frustrating. If a word has two meanings, both should be accepted. The sentences are isolated ones, out of any context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoubleLingot

A practicum is a course in which theory is put into practice, a practical training or research session. An internship is the position held by an intern, or the period of time when someone is an intern. The "funny" thing is that both internship and practical training are accepted and practicum is omitted as a correct answer. This is inconsistent and self-contradictory.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZaZooBred

Is there a difference between "practice" and "internship"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aidan178900

Internship is unpaid


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Der-Michael

No, internships can be both paid and unpaid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianJeff1

Does Praktikum mean unpaid work or could it also mean paid practical training?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

A Praktikum can be paid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diana553496

My answer 'practicum' was not accepted, but at least in Australia, an internship in a teaching context is often called a 'practicum' ... I did one!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OyesterRixed

Could one say "Mein Praktikum machte Spaß" or "Mein Praktikum hat Spaß gemacht" in order to say "My internship WAS fun" (implying that the internship is over or long in the past)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aidan178900

Machten is present tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No, machten is past tense -- it has the -t- past tense sign.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LesterOlso

Is there a reason that it is incorrect to say my apprenticeship is fun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"apprenticeship" would be better as Lehre -- the sort of education that takes several years to teach you a craft such as blacksmith or mechanic.

Praktikum is usually fairly short (weeks or months, rather than years) and gives you some practical experience but doesn't teach you an entire skill.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Him_j

Fun is noun, not an adjective?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Fun is noun, not an adjective?

No. "fun" is a noun and an adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Him_j

Er. I do know that. I meant, in this context. I would imagine someone saying "my internship is fun(n)" - when they are implying that the internship is a joke/not-serious. When using fun as an adjective (hence not capitalized in German) the speaker would mean that their internship is enjoyable/interesting/ exciting. ( A fun(adj) one)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

But the German sentence is not ist Spaß but macht Spaß.

Something that macht Spaß is fun (= enjoyable), not "just for fun".

It's an idiom.

Na, macht's Spaß? = "And? Are you guys having fun?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrismoorew

Problem for me with 'is fun'. It is something I never say and rarely hear. I'd say something like 'I'm enjoying my internship', or 'is enjoyable' or something similar, which should be accepted, I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aldapaaldapa

I agree, the translation "My internship is fun" is a word-by-word translation and it's not culturally appropriate in English. No one would say that. Better translations are "My internship is interesting" or "My internship is engaging".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielBer689099

MACHT MEANS TO BE HERE?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimoneBa

"Spaß machen" is idiomatic:

Es macht mir Spaß: I'm having fun (with something)

Das Spiel macht Spaß: The game is fun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.P.Niers

Yeah. It makes a bit more sense why it means what it means, when you translate it literally: ‘It makes fun for me.’

Of course that isn't correct English, but it shows why ‘Spaß machen’ means ‘to be fun’.


[deactivated user]

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vabelie

    In "it makes sense", nothing "makes" anything either; "make" rather appears to mean "to have". Languages… And the phrasing is trickling down to other languages too.

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