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  5. "Ele pega a minha capa."

"Ele pega a minha capa."

Translation:He takes my cape.

November 16, 2013

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethOComedy

Is this meant for the Marvel universe or is there something that I'm missing with this sentence He gets my cape is not something I'd be likely to say often in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Not in Portuguese either. Just a random sentence. Capa also means cover.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharrondbb

Por que "a minha capa" e nao "pega minha capa". Obrigada


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

both are correct! =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dorkami

I left out the article and it said it was wrong. I'll report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amanda.pac6

I'm not sure about Brazilian Portuguese, but in the Azores I always hear "pegar" as to take by grabbing or stealing, whereas I always "tomar" in more of the context of how we say in English "take a pill" or "take an exam"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emerson.Rosa

By my point of view (as a Brazilian), "tomar" is closer to stealing. Although both can be used in this context, "ela tomou minha capa" seems (to me) like she stole my cape or, at least, she took it without permission, or against my will. In Brazil, "tomar" can also be used as "beber" (drink). Both are correct, but one is slightly "stronger" than the other.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steencs

So pegar is taking or grabbing something but with the owners permission?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aec_216

What is the difference between tomar and pegar? They both seem to mean 'to take' .. could you say "ele toma a minha capa"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emerson.Rosa

"tomar" is a more "strong" verb, mean almost to steal something; to take without permission; "pegar" is more close to "grab"; "you grab something" = "você pega algo"

They are not that far in the meaning though, you can use both without much problem with the understanding! ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/surfx2015

Complementing what Emerson.Rosa says: Tomar can have the meaning of beber - to drink

Eu tomo suco - Eu bebo suco - I drink juice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustinSchu2

Maybe for Zé do Caixão!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rosalind6

The dictionary say's that capa is cape cloack. cover and coat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barbaratorrance

does Pegar mean to take or to get? IN english they mean different things


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/usama.ahmed8010

Why is there an 'a' after 'pega' and before 'minha'??? Is it necessary? Will the sentence make sense without it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/surfx2015

This a specifies the cape. You can omit it:

Ele pega minha capa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheMACneitor

Can I say "Ele pega a meu capa" or "Ele pega meu capa"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

No. "Meu" is used for masculine, singular nouns, and "capa" is a feminine, singular noun. You have to use "Minha" instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheMACneitor

:O OHHHH now I get the difference! Thank you very much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grumpy_cat12

I thought pega means pay. I suppose it has double meanings, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

To pay = pagar

  • He takes/catches = ele pega
  • He pays = ele paga

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wekake

It's nearly impossible to detect the "a" between "pega" and "capa".

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