https://www.duolingo.com/oxq

Esperanto Course?

oxq
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I really want to learn Esperanto but was wondering how far and how fluent this Duolingo course alone will take me.

Any thoughts?

2 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NukuchAjau

Vivu Esperanton! La kurso estas tre bona, Ĝi estas en profundo sufiĉe, sed ĝi estas ankoraŭ kreskanta !

Long live Esperanto! The course is very good, it is in depth enough, but it is still growing!

Post vi kompletigas la kurson, vi povas lerni de aliaj fontoj. Esperanto estas amuza kaj facila!

After you complete the course, you can learn from other resources. Esperanto is fun and easy!

Mi estas nur nivelo kvar, sed mi havas esperojn en esperanto.

I am only level four, but I have hopes for Esperanto.

Ĝi estas en la nomo ;)

It is in the name ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vanege
Vanege
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From my own experience and from the Duolingo learners I spoke with, the Duolingo course is really good to reach/approach fluency, since you have a lot of already made sentences. You can focus less on grammar and more on adapting sentences you already know, in order to convey what you want to say.

You need to put the sentences in practice. I think you need around 10 speaking sessions (~30 min) become a fluent beginner. Yes, you can be beginner and fluent in Esperanto. There are many reasons for it :

  • If you don't know a word or idea, you can re-build it in the go. The simple grammar leaves enough working memory to prepare what you are going to say.
  • People will understand you, because the pronunciation in so easy. It helps self-confidence a lot.
  • If your read a little about the grammar (read the PMEG), there are a lot of ways to gain time = make longer sentences with the same amount of information, so you have more time to focus on what you are going to say next.
  • You can speak Esperanto slowly (=not like Evildea). Nobody will think you are a bad speaker, if you put the emphasis on pronunciation (remember to stress the before-last syllabe).
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevanSF
KevanSF
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Well if you "really want to learn Esperanto," just start the course! What have you got to lose? It's not like it costs anything, and you will definitely learn something. If you don't learn enough from the Duo course for your needs, at least you'll have a solid foundation to take advantage of other Esperanto resources.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Falsafaa
Falsafaa
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From my understanding and what I have been hearing, you should know enough to be able to understand someone speaking Esperanto once you have completed the course. This course will teach you all 16 of the Esperanto grammar rules and give you a good vocabulary set with which you can later use to expand your knowledge of Esperanto. Once you've finished the course, you could continue learning with the suggestions in amuzulo's post: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/10334863. I have been learning for about a month and I'm almost halfway through my tree, though how far you will make it within a month varies greatly depending on how much time you invest everyday.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SariniLynn
SariniLynn
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I spent 55 days reaching the end of the tree. Another 20 days put me on the brink of fully gold for the first time (though it took another month before I could keep it that way!). During that time, I really only used Duolingo. I poked around Lernu a bit, but didn't do any courses. I had a couple of conversations through italki, but only by direct message; no real-time speaking practice. I watched a couple of interviews on Youtube, but I relied entirely on the English subtitles, just trying to catch a word here and there.

Then I went to my first local group meeting, around day 70. Before going, I wrote an email to the coordinator, entirely in Esperanto, letting him know that I planned to attend, that I was a beginner from Duolingo, that I would be bringing young children (It only seems polite to warn people, even though the invitation specifically allowed all ages and levels!), and that I was quite nervous about my ability to speak and understand the language. He replied, and I was able to ignore the English translation he kindly provided, as I fully understood him in Esperanto.

The day before the meeting, I watched the first episode of Pasporto al la Tuta Mondo on Youtube, trying to calm my nerves, since I had literally never had to understand spoken Esperanto beyond a single sentence at a time. Then I went to the meeting. And I understood. :-) They told me, in Esperanto, about the club, about the members who were not present, about some of the past meetings, about which dictionaries were the best, and so on. I didn't know all of the words, but I was able to follow along and pick up the rest from context. They were not speaking at Evildea-speed, but they were speaking at a comfortable speed, not giving me one word at a time. While there, I explained in Esperanto how I discovered the language, how I felt about the Duolingo course, and so on. I had to speak slowly, with a fair amount of hesitation and word-searching (according to me), but they were complimentary of how well I could speak for a beginner, and specifically of my grasp of the grammar.

Since then, I have improved a lot. I borrowed a copy of Gerda Malaperis from my local group leaders, and read through it. Somewhere in the middle, I noticed that I was able to stop translating and simply read. I started watching Evildea in earnest, and I now watch new videos as soon as they are released, subtitle-free. (In fact, I have so far done English subtitles on two of his videos myself!) I am able to switch in and out of Esperanto easily, checking Verduloj for new posts in between my French lessons and discussing Daniel Tiger with my toddler. I don't really consider myself an expert yet. There is a lot of vocabulary I am missing, and I need more speaking practice to smooth out the hesitations. But my local group leaders now correct me if I call myself a komencanto.

So that's where this course alone took me, personally. From zero to using the language effectively for both written and spoken communication, but with more practice needed to comfortably call myself fluent.

(Oh, and in terms of measurable progress... The Duolingo course put me "meznivelo" by Lernu standards. I was able to ace the base-level exam, and pass the mid-level, but I couldn't really touch the upper-level test, after completing Duolingo. (Since then, I have noticed some of the things that tripped me up on the upper-level test in my Duo practice... but I haven't tried it again since that first gold tree...))

Note: I definitely did use the Tips & Notes. I went to the computer at the start of each new skill to read the notes. I read through the notes for every skill again after completing my tree. I'm not sure I would have reached the same level if I had ignored the notes. Unlike many of the courses on Duolingo, the Esperanto notes are extremely well-written and thorough. I also made use of the sentence discussions when I didn't understand something about a sentence. I strongly recommend both resources. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klanestro

You can complete Duolingo in 3 day's

other website that you can practice and learn other languages including #Esperanto

https://www.gospeaky.com This is a really cool new social networking site for language lerners\

https://bliubliu.com Read in your target language

and I love www.memrise.com To really improve your vocab

tatoeba.org One Sentace many languages

ĝis

2 years ago
Learn Esperanto in just 5 minutes a day. For free.