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  5. "Hva er egentlig typisk norsk…

"Hva er egentlig typisk norsk?"

Translation:What is typical Norwegian actually?

October 24, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athalawulfaz

Så... brunost?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnikiTheHuman

Å spørre hva som er typisk norsk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amaratea

Bingo! https://www.aftenposten.no/meninger/sid/i/6Vxz/Hva-er-egentlig-typisk-norsk

Jeg mener nemlig at vi har svaret i spørsmålet om hva som er typisk norsk. Det er typisk norsk å være opptatt av hva som er typisk norsk. Vi får ofte dette spørsmålet, og vi svarer nesten alltid det samme; fjell, lange og dype daler, Kvikklunsj, ski, påskesol og mye annet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
  • 2497

Good question.

In this sentence, "typical" is used as an adjective describing the Norwegian language.
Who speaks typical Norwegian? What actually is typical Norwegian? What does typical Norwegian sound like?

If you're asking about practices/products/habits/culture that are Norwegian, you would use the adverb, "typically," What (thing) is typically Norwegian?

Translations for both interpretations are accepted. :0)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiacomoLamanuzzi

A viking from a small fishing village who loves brun ost


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amaratea

Strictly speaking, brunost was invented long after the end of the Viking age. Something fish-related, like a forefather of lutefisk, is more likely :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sportkozmosz

Gå på tur I allslags vær


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sportkozmosz

å drikke masse kaffe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria159845

Brun ost and gammal ost


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan_D_13

Hurtigruten?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaptainSeaweed

This might be good Norsk, but the answer seems to be, well, kind of awkward English, from the west side of the pond anyway. UK students may have a very different opinion.

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