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"Le salon"

Translation:The living room

2 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AmandaHagg2

I put 'The room', as thought salon was room - why 'The show'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gp6am
Gp6am
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I think the French also have (or at least used to have) important art exhibitions called salons -- similar to the Cannes Film Festival but for painters, sculptors, and other visual artists.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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"The room" is not specific enough. "Salon" is specific to a living room (family room, sitting room), but may also be used to refer to a "show" (fair, exposition, expo), e.g., un salon des arts ménages = a home crafts show (exhibition); un salon nautique = boat show; un salon de livre = a book fair. (Larousse)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul417145

The very next question after this one had 'room' is an acceptable translation for salon. This question or the other needs to be fixed. :(

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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I found no other sentence where "salon" was translated as "room" in any of its variations.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meatcan
meatcan
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I just had an audio question of "le salon" and the correct translation was given as "the living room." 15 May 2018

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Persona14
Persona14
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What is the French translation for beauty/hair salon?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Salon de beauté, salon de coiffure.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gp6am
Gp6am
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What is the French equivalent of the English "salon" = an assembly of guests in a drawing room or reception room of a mansion, especially an assembly, common during the 17th and 18th centuries, consisting of the leaders in society, art, politics, etc.?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
OsoGegenHest
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That is a French term.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nicola526448
Nicola526448
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I believe that would be a 'salon' :-) I think that's one of the words we stole.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmandaHagg2

That's what I thought but i told me 'The room' was wrong and it told me the answer was 'the show'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skippero
Skippero
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"le salon" can be both: Either the living room, or the show in the sense of trade-show, fair, exposition.

"room" alone for "salon" does not sound right to me. I agree with DL on that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aussie3931
aussie3931
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Our house has a lounge room and a living room, either of which are sitting rooms, and one is also a family room. I'm not precious about subtle differences in meaning, just want to learn the correct French way of expressing each of these terms. 'The lounge room' also back translates to 'le salon' but not accepted by Duo. :-(

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
daughterofAlbion
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I hope you find these helpful: http://www.cnrtl.fr/definition/salon
http://www.cnrtl.fr/definition/parloir.

(English English speaker) For me, the terms lounge, living room and sitting room are now interchangeable, although in earlier eras a sitting room was the term for a drawing room or parlour (i.e. the room used to entertain guests). I am guessing that for you, a sitting room retains this meaning of the room in which you entertain visitors, and that a family room is where the family relaxes (does it also have the same implication for you as it does for me, that it is too informal for visitors - except the kind that are "almost family"?) What is the distinction between a lounge room (which the Oxford dictionary tells me is an Australian equivalent for lounge) and a living room for you?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aussie3931
aussie3931
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Hi from Australia. A lounge room was a term widely used in Australia during the 50's, 60's, 70's for a room containing 'lounges'. The term 'lounges' was a shortened term for 'lounge chairs'. By order of many of our mothers, lounges were not to be sat on by mere family members, but were sometimes covered by protective plastic sheet, to be removed only when visitors were invited. In the late fifties, when television was introduced to Australia, more robust vinyl covered chairs were sometimes introduced into the lounge room, where family members were permitted to sit. The 'lounges' kept their hallowed status, and one was not permitted to watch television whilst sitting thereon. A living room, on the other hand, was, and still is, a much more useful and robust room. We were allowed to sit on chairs (lower status than lounges) to watch the new colour television in 1975. We were also permitted to sit on bean bags which were very trendy. The living room also (often) housed a dining table and so we could eat dinner whilst watching I Love Lucy, MASH, Leave it to Beaver, Disneyland, Sunday Night at the movies (always seemed to be sponsored by Colgate Palmolive) and Alfred Hitchcock Presents. (Just to name a few). Oddly, our house, built in 1980, has a lounge room, a dining room, a family room and a rumpus room (which used to be a double garage). We VERY RARELY use the lounge room with its comfy lounge chairs and open fire, but prefer to eat in the family room/living room which is adjacent to the kitchen and which also houses our music/video equipment and a slow combustion wood fire. There are no rules about not being allowed to sit in the lounge room. Sorry about my rambling answer, and I am sure that other Australians have different stories to tell, but there are eight million stories in the naked city, and this has been one of them.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
daughterofAlbion
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That was fascinating, and probably necessary to enable a native French speaker to translate your terminology correctly (if my links didn't resolve it).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aussie3931
aussie3931
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Vos liens internet étaient extrêmement intéressants. Je vous remercie. J'espère que vous avez constaté que mes remarques ne doivent pas être prises trop au sérieux. Désolé si mon français est écrit par une vache espagnole. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
daughterofAlbion
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Bien sûr! ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RoohanaKha

I put parlor. Isn't a parlor same thing as living room?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebec
bluebec
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There is a reply further up that explains this. A "parlor" is not the same as a living room as it was a room specifically for entertaining guests, not the rooms in which the family live day to day.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christel436087

I wrote living room as the translation for le salon. And I got it wrong. Strange. Another thing = after a long time I still am at 63%. It never changes. Why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebec
bluebec
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63% fluency? I'm stuck at 57%, so you're doing well. We can't be 100% fluent as Duolingo doesn't teach all of the French language, just a lot of it.

Things that Duolingo doesn't cover, which I find weird: Garlic Octopus Sheep (I'm an Australian, we exist on eating lamb, and yet I don't know what the French for sheep or lamb is) All baby animals really Underwear Common medical items (bandage, wheelchair, crutches, splint, plaster cast, some medicines like painkillers) Etc

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cuzza99
Cuzza99
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I'm another Aussie and if you don't know by now, sheep=le mouton and lamb=l'aigneau (fem.) The rest of those words aren't nearly as important as these two :P

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SurrindraV

Likewise, I am also stuck at 63% for a long time but I am also acutely aware that I am far from achieving 100% efficiency through Duolingo which provides grammar and vocabulary at a basic level. I think the top up has to come from outside Duolingo comprising advanced grammar, extensive vocabulary as well as oral comprehension of the French language in depth. The frustrating bit is that you can no longer monitor your progress beyond 63% while one is acutely aware of one's weaknesses other than accept the fact learning a language is for life long challenge. A good memory and exposure to Frech speaking nation will certainly help.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mevanssteele

'The show'??? What in the WORLD is going on with that?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LPrene

Sitting room is rarely used in America. I remember hearing it in the 1970s, but not in the subsequent decades.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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You may often see a translation that is common in some other English dialect which does not impose on a requirement that you call it that.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackson357434

Surely salon is room. The living room is sejour?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Surely "salon" is living room (and its variants: sitting room, lounge, lounge room).

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anchalak

Is drawing room also correct?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LunaFowler

Isn't salon(my correct answer) used for multiple things in English? If I'm not entirely mistaken about that, which "salons" does the French refer to? Or do the uses in French and English mostly overlap?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lil_gamer246

i think the reason why they don't accept it because it is linked to your email and your email says where it is from so some words can be just American or some can be britain

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebec
bluebec
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While that is somewhat true, that won't be the case for this program. For example, I use a gmail account (ends in .com - which would signify USA) but am from Australia, and Australian English is its own fun dialect.

The creators of this course have done their best to capture all the relevant English translations, and where they have missed one, are happy to add it if reported.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrian-paula
adrian-paula
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Sitting room was accepted as correct at the beginning of this exercise. It is used more frequently in English than living room.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebec
bluebec
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Not sure where you're from adrian-paula, but "sitting room" is not used more frequently in English across the globe. English has multiple dialacts, and some use "sitting room" to refer to what I would call the "lounge-room" in Australia, and some use "living room".

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dafirst

This is purelly idiomatic. You have to be french to translate Salon into Living Room

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carlvincentm
carlvincentm
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WTFeck is a sitting room?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebec
bluebec
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A room, in which you sit. A very British term which is therefore used in former UK colonies like India, Pakistan, and in parts of Australia (see my response further down the thread)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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You mean you don't sit in your house? How odd! The sitting room is used for entertaining (posh) guests. You all sit down together and have tea.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/americanmiles

Sitting room??? No one calls it a sitting room

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebec
bluebec
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Except for those who do. It's very common in South Asia for example, and I believe is still used in the UK.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ronnie380928

Those of us of a certain age in UK would. We might also call it the front room from a time when it was reserved for special occasions and visitors.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shinb
shinb
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Sitting room is very common in Hiberno-English

2 years ago