"Il fait chaud et elle bronze."

Translation:It is hot and she tans.

6 years ago

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/claswell925
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There is a difference in Il est chaud and Il fait chaud. On says he is hot the other implies that the weather is hot.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zetland
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But "il est chaud" would translate as something like "he is sexy", wouldn't it? Isn't "il a chaud" the way of saying that a person is hot because of the weather?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Avatar_Fan

Yes!! I remember reading in the comments section somewhere while talking about the weather "il fait" is used. Thanks for the reminder!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrewcropper

Why is it not: il est

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tlewis

It's just the way the French speak about the weather. See http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/a/weather.htm for example.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveMbonu

Why isn't there a liaison here? Shouldn't it be pronounced 'il fait chaud etelle bronze?'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noahdaniels12

Some words don't liason-including et, singular nouns, and after inversions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joelpittet

"Here, the French "il" means "it" not "he"." The error response is misleading. Il = he but sometimes it means it.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edenstar

I get where you're coming from, but it does say, "here." I did the same thing though.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shriramk

True, but why wouldn't "He is hot and she tans" also be okay? A couple is on the beach, he's feeling warm while she's tanning...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clares
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I think that would be "Il a chaud" (a as in "has"), not "fait".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dellemonty

Agreed. He is hot would be ''il a chaud'' (his personal feelings of his temperature). If it were an object that was hot, like, say, a floor (un plancher), it would be ''il est chaud'.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hanhnq87

How should I pronounce the part "et elle bronze" ? I cannot figure it out from the audio. Are the two words "et elle" combined in one sound?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dellemonty

I really think that the word 'suntan' should be added as a possibility here.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John787925
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I (Brit) have never heard "suntan" used as a verb. You can tan, or get a tan, or get a suntan, but it would sound weird to me to just say "he suntanned".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockyRogue

She could be tanning at a salon.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SkepticalStudent

I believe "to suntan" or "to sunbathe" would be "bronzer au soleil". If she were sunbathing on the beach, "elle bronze au soleil (sur la plage)"... I think.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beasus
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i have translated elle bronze as she suntans and was marked wrong. It should be accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Savriel

I've always thought of "suntans" as a leisure activity, and "tans" as more.. a phenomenon that happens to your skin. For example, she could not INTEND on tanning that day, but she does regardless because it's hot out.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/D9PyKDFm

....and I, "she is getting a tan" which was also marked wrong.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Reavenk
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Maybe she's being crisped by a UV light (or oven).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ameliacullen
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could elle se bronze be used here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/norteaga
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In Spanish it would be: "Il fait chaud" = "Está haciendo calor" or "Hace calor"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Artilex

uh...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcoiris1
Plus
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Why are we learning this so early in the tree?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paruam
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Are they saying she is going somewhere tanned, or getting a tan? It sounds strange to me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BasslineJo

I don't even understand what this statement is about

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bcrimando

Boy, I don't know if it was my hearing or the quality of my audio, but even after I saw what the right answer was I could not understand "bronze" or any word starting with a b. And I got this isolated as part of a general review, so I had no contextual clues other than the first part of the sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davewilson123

I put 'he is hot' X I accept 'it is hot' but how do I say he is hot?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/candy_goodman

I think if you are saying a PERSON is feeling hot (inside their body), you use avoir (so: Il A chaud, j'AI chaud) and if you're talking about an object that feels hot to the touch, you use etre (la plaque chauffante EST chaud)... This is from what I remember learning a few years ago at school!

http://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/chaud-and-froid-in-french Read this to understand easier (I'm rubbish at explaining things!)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tajger
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From what I understood "he is hot" should be "il est chaud". Being the same level as your, I can't really be 100% sure of it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChayanBanerjee

So whenever Il fait + adjective is given, then "il"is it , right?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anarchymaaa

why is it "il" fait when SHE is tanning? would you ever say "elle" fait?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockyRogue

'Il' means 'it', not 'he'. Didn't the error message tell you that?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SkepticalStudent

"Il fait ___" is used to talk about the weather in French! :) Par exemple, "Il fait chaud en été et il fait froid en hiver". S'il fait froid, je doute qu'elle bronze...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/knoxy
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Il referes to dehors/outside not the girl tanning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianJosh
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et elle - why it sounds e el not etel?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackYakov
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"il fait chaud " could mean "he makes something warm"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Corvus86
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She goes tanned? Sorry but where is the verb aller in the sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeoTN
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What's wrong with "It's getting hot and she's tanning"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SkepticalStudent

What's wrong with "the weather is hot and she is tanning"? Is it because it says "il fait chaud" and not "le temps est chaud"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeVawn

Ok, this might have already been asked but i didn't find the comment so, when dsoes Il mean 'it' opposed to 'he?'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SkepticalStudent

In most cases it means "he", but when it's followed by "fait" and something referring to the temperature or weather (chaud, froid, frais, du soleil, du vent) then it means "it" ("it" being the weather, of course).

If you wanted to say "he is hot (temperature-wise)", it would be "il a chaud". So you can usually assume it means "he", but then sometimes it can refer to an inanimate object ("il est chaud" where "il" is le mur or another masculine object, and you know it is hot because you have touched it and it felt hot).

Attempt at a summary:

"Il fait chaud" = weather.

"Il a chaud" = how he feels.

"Il est chaud" = how something OR someone feels to the touch.

(And for the record: "C'est chaud" = how something feels to the touch (but it can ONLY be inanimate objects).)

ETA: I forgot about "il faut". That's another case where "il" means "it"!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeVawn

Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christinedtsch

oh maaan, I always write "he" instead of "it" .... yeah it doesn't make any sense ... but I don't get the context of the original sentence as well.... it can be hot in a room where she cannot tan. :D Am I right?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntonioM3

Another senseless sentence FROOoooM Duolingo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IdalecioJunior

I always imagine the one that formulates theses phrases feeding his creativity and laughing too

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MTCarey
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does bronzer equate more to sun-bathe or to tan, or is there no difference in French. Thank you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/viheleha

Why no ellison between et and elle/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
Mod
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There is no elision (élision) with "et".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/viheleha

Merci.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cecilchase

I think my translation was spot on: He is hot and she is tanned! Please clarify.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SkepticalStudent

"Elle bronze" is communicating an action she's doing, though, while "she is tan" communicates that she/her skin is tan. The sentence Duolingo has written involves a verb, and the translation you wrote is for a sentence that involves an adjective.

To clarify:

"Elle bronze" = She tans or She is tanning

"Elle est bronzée" = She is tan

** Side note about "tan" vs. "tanned": It was my understanding that "tan" is the adjective and "tanned" is something else (like tanned leather, or being tanned (getting into trouble or being spanked) for doing something wrong), but a very shallow Google search suggests that usage of these changes depending on where you are.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankie100828

We call tanning sunbathing

5 months ago
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