https://www.duolingo.com/Keciaann

Dutch vs Flemish

Does anyone know what the major differences are between Dutch and Flemish? Will a person speaking Flemish be able to understand Dutch?

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lelieblad

Yes, a person speaking Flemish will be able to understand Dutch. It's like American English vs. British English, Latin American Spanish vs. Spain Spanish, and so on.

Flemish has different words for some things, and as my Dutch boyfriend says, it can be 'more technical' than the Dutch spoken in the Netherlands. I'd say it's like if you learn Spain Spanish (which is a more technical Spanish) you'll be able to understand all Latin American Spanish pretty much.

3 years ago

[deactivated user]

    I'm not 100% on this but I heard Flemish doesn't use Jij, Zij, Hij etc. Apparently they just use Je, Ze, He yada yada. Is this true?

    EditDelete3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/TimothyAspeslagh

    I'm flemish and I can use "je, jij, ge, gij" whenever. But when I'm talking to someone and I use gij I won't switch to another one of course, consistency.

    I won't say my accent is better/worse than dutch, like JC here, because that's subjective. But I ca say that a flemish accent is more softer.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JC-Belgium
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    Ik vindt dat de Vlamingen zachter spreken en dat wij een mooier accent hebben. Ik beledig de Nederlanders zeker niet.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Blockhause
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    Both parties perfectly understand each other. There are little differences in pronunciation, for example Flemish people pronounce the G softer.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Olga451165
    Olga451165
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    As long as we are on the G subject.. from what I heard the norther and the southern parts of the Netherlands have very different pronunciations. some say the N in the ending of words that end in "en" like "makken"/"morgen" others drop the N and just say "makke.."/"morge" also the G is very soft sometimes like "goedenmorgen" vs "goeiemorge"

    As part of learning a language I try to learn how to say the words without accent.. but actually I'm not sure in which direction to go with such clear differences.. it's not a matter of not being understood, and I guess there's no right or wrong.. so that's even more confusing..

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Blockhause
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    I would say: just stick to the official way of saying things. The examples given by you are mostly 'lazy' ways of pronouncing things ;)

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/TimothyAspeslagh

    More colloquial than lazy but sometimes the border between the two is indistinguishable. Like if I say "goedemorgen" to my friends it'll sound weird because it's quite formal. "goeiemorgen" will sound more right

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/maxbiemans

    mooi toch nederlands

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Roberto1003

    It can be compared with British english and american english, or the spanish in South America and the spanish in Spain. Im flemish, we just change a lot of words like 'jij' becomes 'gij', or 'ik ben' becomes 'kben' or 'kzen' and we have a lot of different dialects depending where you grew up in the flanders part in Belgium, but we understand dutch perfectly.

    3 years ago
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