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https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator

Guidelines for commenting in Immersion with a Tag ([Coding rubric])

Dessamator
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There seems to be a lot of inconsistency with the way people comment in the immersion, some offer some ideas, others leave it blank, and others use whatever manner they prefer. So I'm thinking of adding these Guidelines for commenting [Coding rubric] to the unofficial Immersion Community guidelines (http://www.duolingo.com/comment/984423)**:

General

Always try to provide a comment, and a rubric;

Coding Rubric(CR)

  1. [Spe] - Spelling mistake in the text;
  2. [Gram] [*rule]- Grammar mistake in the text, [rule];
  3. [Impr] - Improving the text making it more natural;
  4. [Word] - Word[s] translated incorrectly;
  5. [Punct] - Punctuation error;
  6. [Idiom] - An incorrectly translated idiom;
  7. [Lit] - Literal translation;
  8. [Tense] - Use of incorrect tense ;
  9. [Unif] - Change made to maintain consistency;
  10. [Reg] - Language Register error correcting language ;
  11. [Name] - Proper name should not be translated
  12. [Other] - any other issue.

E.g. :

  • Sentence: "I to eat grapes";
  • Comment: [punct] A full stop is missing;
  • Comment: [CR1,2]: place verb in correct position & spelling;

These are just my views on the guidelines, and they may change if the community disagrees with these points.If you wish to comment, indicate which ones you agree/disagree with, and provide reasoning for it. If possible also suggest alternate names or coding rubric.

4 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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I think leaving comments in the form of codes is just going to confuse people. Simply writing "Fixing a typo" or "x was in the wrong tense" seems much more helpful than saying "[CR 1, 8]".

Memorizing the list of codes and expecting all other users to also memorize them or at least know what they mean to look up the list seems somewhat counterproductive. Just explain in plain English (or the applicable target language).

I do think as a general rule, people should try to take advantage of the comment box more. It makes changes feel less arbitrary, so people will hopefully not take the changes personally. It can also nip an edit war in the bud if someone preemptively explains why they changed something.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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The CR, is probably a bad idea, I agree. But I'd rather say a few things than write a full paragraph explaining it over and over again. Different points of view I guess.

In the IT world, we(or only me perhaps) loathe repetition, re-writing the same thing when there is a more effective way of reducing, reusing, and referring doesn't make sense to me. Perhaps the general public is different, but if texting is anything to go by, this gets quickly adopted as long as it is easy to understand and useful, e.g. LOL, tldr, and so on...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stecchetto
stecchettoPlus
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The thing is that since you're still leaving a comment along with the code, the code isn't really adding anything. It's just classifying the type of error, which might be useful if we wanted to do some sort of statistical analysis after the fact, but it doesn't really tell the other translator any useful additional information. You also can't really replace an entire paragraph of explanation with just a short code, so if there's something you think needs a lengthy explanation this won't save you from that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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I think the key word there is "easy to understand". I mean "typo", "spelling", "wrong tense", "too literal", "x is an idiom", etc. are pretty quick things to write and are clearly understandable.

Personally, I've rarely found the need to write more than one full sentence, let alone an entire paragraph, when I edit something. Having said that, if I found myself having to provide the same long explanation over and over, I'd probably save it somewhere to copy and paste it. That would save me time and would still be understandable and useful for the person whose translation I was commenting on.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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Well, perhaps you review very little at a time, or documents you read are almost always clean. But I read this thoughtful comment which prompted me to highlight this:

Comment by Potatosage: Magician has been used all the way so far and in reality a magician and a wizard are different: a magician is a human being who has through diligent study and practice of the occult arts, acquired the ability to work magic.

I really enjoyed his description, very nice, very accurate and very useful. However, I could have quickly understood what he wished to convey like so:

Comment by Potatosage: [Unif ][TransError] - Magician, human who acquired magical abilities, rather than wizard,(A wizard is a being (not necessarily entirely human) endowed with supernatural powers).

Also, in terms of evaluating my mistakes, I'd prefer it that way, if I often receive consistency errors/spelling or grammar from editors. That shows there an area I need to improve on, and is rather easy to evaluate when looking through emails.

But like I said before, to each their own, I appreciate your feedback.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stecchetto
stecchettoPlus
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Again, the thing with your example is that it works just as well if you omit the "[Unif][TransError]". All the tags are doing is classifying the error, which may be useful for analytical purposes, but doesn't really add new information.

Having said that, maybe tagging errors by type is something that the DL team would be interested in doing for analytical purposes. But I think that might be better suited to a dedicated "Error type" selection box or button than a text tag. Maybe you could suggest that to them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louis.vang
louis.vang
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The list of the codes should be displayed when you want to write a comment are will read a comment.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/revdolphin
revdolphin
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There should be an [Other] option as well. For example, I was translating into Spanish something that quoted a book. I have the official Spanish translation of that book so I changed all the quotes to match that translation, citing the book in the comments.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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Certainly you're right. Added.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/revdolphin
revdolphin
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I just discovered another common error than could perhaps be in this rubric:

[Name] - Proper name should not be translated

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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I didn't really think anyone was even using these. Good to know it is useful for someone. Added...

4 years ago