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  5. "Ŝi trinkas glason da blanka …

"Ŝi trinkas glason da blanka vino."

Translation:She is drinking a glass of white wine.

October 27, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pureintellect

For those wondering why romance languages have the word "blanco" (or similar versions) for white, while english has the word "black" for black, it is because in ancient Proto-Indo- European, the ancestor of "blanco" and "black" meant "great light or flame" some people used the word to describe the light itself (blanco), while others took it to describe the ashes or darkness left behind after the fire went out. I find this very interesting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pureintellect

I missed a period after "great light or flame


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic

For future reference, you can always edit your own posts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tebis11

And you can always delete your comment about editing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DosePerCapita

That is interesting. Do you have any references for this? I tried duckduckgoing that but didn't come up with much. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2336

blanc is a cognate with the English blank. According to etymonline.com:

blank (adj.)
early 13c., "white, pale, colorless," from Old French blanc "white, shining," from Frankish *blank "white, gleaming," or some other West Germanic source (compare Old Norse blakkr, Old English blanca "white horse;" Old High German blanc, blanch; German blank "shining, bright"), from Proto-Germanic *blangkaz "to shine, dazzle," extended form of PIE root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn" (see bleach (v.)).

black (adj.)
Old English blæc "dark," from Proto-Germanic *blakaz "burned" (cognates: Old Norse blakkr "dark," Old High German blah "black," Swedish bläck "ink," Dutch blaken "to burn"), from PIE *bhleg- "to burn, gleam, shine, flash" (cognates: Greek phlegein "to burn, scorch," Latin flagrare "to blaze, glow, burn"), from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn;" see bleach (v.).

So it looks like ttri8915 was on the right track.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pureintellect

thanks for doing that. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iman03

Wow... that is interesting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imthebestlearner

blanka is like blank. A blank square is a white square


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ariswanto

"Mi ne trinkas... vinon" - Count Dracula


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2336

Grafo Drakulo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanCast2

Whats the difference of da and de?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle70

According to the "Tips and notes" (available on the web, if you're using an app) for the Da/De section:

DA AND DE

Although both da and de can be translated into English as of, they have different meanings:

Use da when you're talking about quantity.

Use de when talking about possession.

Note: the direct object -n ending (accusative) is NOT used after da or de.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drbox

That makes it harder and they say Esperanto is an easy language! all i can see rules ans rules xD i like it though!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2336

Easy is relative, and rules come in handy. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imthebestlearner

It's related to English and other European languages. That's how it's easy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatttBerger

Why is there no A in this languge?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pureintellect

Because the creator thought it did not make much sense to have indefinites while you could say just the noun and still not be definite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2336

Because the grammar is taken in large part from Slavic languages, which do not have articles.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo576925

I kept reading "vino" as "viro", and it completely changed the meaning of this sentence.

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