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"Si, je comprends très bien !"

Translation:Yes, I understand very well!

4 years ago

105 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlexCGuest

This can't be right.. does 'si' really mean yes in French??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FMTremblay
FMTremblay
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Yes it can. The usual "yes" is almost always "oui" but you can use "si" to contradict a negation. Here is a context so you understand better:

"Oui, je comprends... - Tu ne sembles pas bien comprendre... - Si, je comprends très bien!"

"Yes, I understand... - You don't look like you understand well... - YES, I understand very well!"

As a French Canadian, I don't use it so I will only stress my "oui" to contradict the negation and you can do the same. Using "si" isn't required for people to understand you but it is an interesting word which doesn't have an equivalent in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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English doesn't anymore: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yes_and_no#The_Early_English_four-form_system :)

"Yes, I understand...
- You don't look like you understand well...
- yea, I understand very well!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drplasma64
drplasma64
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cool! I think we need to go back to this in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thohan99
thohan99
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I agree, and the KJV bible would probably be a good place to start. It's chock-full of yeas and nays.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da.big.fella
da.big.fella
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In informal Dutch you can say "chock-full" also and it means the exact same thing. That is awesome.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0b101010

Yea, it would make responding "no" to a negative question much less confusing

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting
Owlspotting
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Interesting! But according to the link, shouldn't the "yes" and "yea" be reversed in your example? Or, are you proposing that since "yes" is now the unmarked/normal one, unlike its status in the earlier stage of English, it should be the (formerly-unmarked/normal) "yea" which becomes marked? (Maybe analogous to how the former "you/thou" distinction in English, where "you" was formal and "thou" informal, has been reversed nowadays?)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djvjgrrl

we still say "yea or nay" when we are voting, maybe this is a survivor? interesting info, thanks :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swampsparrow
swampsparrow
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This is cool. But we do kind of have an equivalent (if I understand how this works). We counter the negation with one of our own: "No, I understand very well!"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brigids.em
brigids.em
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Indeed. I like "On the contrary, ..." for a modern English equivalent of "Si, ..." (although I don't use in on Duo, as it's a more general expression that works in this context, rather than a purpose-fit expression for the exact idea being translated). Admittedly, I tend to favor a more formal tone in situations where I'd be likely to need an equivalent for "Si, ..." -- your mileage may vary. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robin.Hood.
Robin.Hood.
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It's the other way around. "Yea" is what we now say as "yes"; "yes" was the English "si".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Valhalla300
Valhalla300
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In the US we might also say "BS, I understand very well" :) (It may not be appropriate here to say what BS is. But for those of you that might not know, the 'B' stands for "Bull" and you can guess the rest.... ) ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TndeLagler

Si, in French, is an answer when we want to say a contradiction to the other. In English, I think si is but yes. Not just a simply yes. - You don't understand as I hear. - But yes. I very well understand what you've spoken about. You are wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aoind
Aoind
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Yes rather similar to "doch" in German. We don't have a.direct equivalent in English to preface a contradiction. "Actually" or "In fact" would commonly be used although Duolingo didn't like my "Actually".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JSkylerMor

I like indeed for this, as well. I immediately went to German though, too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ramb0t
ramb0t
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Do you know if its common to respond, 'mais oui'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PippiniBoo

So, is Si an indignant Oui?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRealFlenuan
TheRealFlenuan
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Not at all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pammysoup

Thats how i perceived, as though it were being said by a teenager in trouble

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkHouseholder

That's funny! The tone of voice makes the difference in how the word is perceived in French. "Your Duolingo name is not pammysoup." "Si." (Yes, or Sure, it is.) "You don't understand!" "Siiii!" You get the picture. ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amoc123

I agree with FMTremblay--and here is a link to a page all about "si" and its use/meaning in different contexts. http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/a/si.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heidijan
Heidijan
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Ah, nice, in Scandinavia we have this too!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LillaMy94
LillaMy94
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In Swedish it's like the difference between "ja" and "jo".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KylleChick

It's like this in Danish as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HermoineGr8

Well just for everyone's info..'si' is 'yes' in Spanish.... Nooo!! I lost a heart!!!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexCGuest

Oh, okay! I grew up learning French in Ottawa so I'm glad I have an excuse for not knowing this one. Thanks a lot FMTremblay!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FMTremblay
FMTremblay
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You're welcome!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelSmit4
SamuelSmit4
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Thanks, this one had me flummoxed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GigiGottwald
GigiGottwald
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To emphasize the intention to contradict the negative statement, one might say "Yes, I do understand" and really stress that "do"!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas_Slo
Thomas_Slo
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What about "Sure, I understand"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ATBeautiful

What is the most popular one?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hector290697

Merci, Francois. :)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edunne8701
edunne8701
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Yeah I agree with you! 'Si' means yes in Spanish... but I did not think it was yes in French.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilCostin
PhilCostin
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Technically, in Spanish, 'si' translates as 'if' and 'sí' translates as 'yes' whereas in French, 'si' => 'actuallyyes' ....au contraire mon frère?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkHouseholder

Yes, it does. The word 'si' is 'yes' to a question or statement posed in the negative. For example: "You don't speak French." "Yes, I do!" or "Oh yes, I do!" En français : "Vous ne parlez pas français." "Si, je le parle!" Be careful... 'si' also means 'if', but that would be another context, of course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRealFlenuan
TheRealFlenuan
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It technically is a special case of "Non".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larisa_L
Larisa_L
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Indeed, in Russian we say Non in this particular type of sentence :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jamila_A

'Si' is yes in Spanish

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marko246521
Marko246521
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Yes in Spanish is sí not si. Si if yes in French if responding to a negative statement or question. Eg: Vous naimez pas de pommes. Si, je les aime.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GraemeJeal
GraemeJeal
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I think the best use of "SI" clears up uncertainty which would arise from yes/no. For example, in English you ask "don't you like this?" The answer yes or no is not clear. In French, the answer "si" would mean "Yes, I do like it".

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fr224
fr224
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How I feel about Duolingo making me redo these lessons for the updated tree.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zkrueger
zkrueger
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For Germans, "si" is something like "doch." Ja! Nein! Doch! For American children, this is something like "yes-huh." Yes! No! Yes-huuuuuh!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MDaniels87
MDaniels87
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I always did "yuh-uh"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/80R
80R
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is there a difference between the german 'doch' and the french 'si'? (other than the language that it's in)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lissybeth91

Ha! I knew we Americans had something like this!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neco_Coneco
Neco_Coneco
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Is si also the same with Swedish Jo ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heidijan
Heidijan
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Jepp!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neco_Coneco
Neco_Coneco
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Tack, Merci ! :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/weilingtay

Would "Non, non, mon cher! Tu ne comprends pas!" be a possible previous sentence?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/unPlatypus

Yes, from what I've learned one generally uses "si" if question is asked with negation

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T.A.R.D.I.S.girl

It's a bit ironic that i had a but of trouble understanding this sentence, no?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchbreadrules

How come it gives the options for the translation of 'si' as 'yes', 'such as', and 'B'!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ieviss
ieviss
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I don't know about "such as", but "B" is the letter which signifies the note "ti" in music - do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti. This can be written using letters - C, D, E, F, G, A, B. And this B in French is "si".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchbreadrules

Very interesting! Merci beaucoup!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alex_olson

I would have translated that as "if I understand." But, I am still learning, so that is good to know.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aucunLien
aucunLien
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Well it would actually be what you are proposing, if that comma wasn't there. (Although in that case, and in lack of context, people would be likely to bank on a simple omission of the comma and still go with the "yes" version)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djvjgrrl

now i always translate "si" in french into "oh yes (i do/have/can/insert verb here)" here, and it works very well

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marko246521
Marko246521
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This is wrong! The French word for if is si. This module is conjunctions. There has been no negative sentence this contradicts. This is wrong pedagogically: It is irrelevant to the module. It is misleading because si has been if in the remainder of the module. It is out of context: There has not been a negative sentence.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aoind
Aoind
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Well the "si" in the sentence above certainly doesn't translate to "if" here does it? For a start there is a comma after it and even if there weren't then then the conditional mood would be required (comprendrais) and the sentence would be relegated to a subsidiary clause and therefore nonsensical while missing its main clause.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MateoNas

I. "No, I understand very well" would seem to make more sense (or at least just as much sense) as "Yes,...".

"Si" is negating the claim made by the other speaker, so "No" seems quite acceptable to me.

II. Regardless of the point above , I can see no reason why "Si" in this context arises in a test of conjunctions. "If" is a conjunction, not "yes" or "no".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nige788085

So im guessing oui means "yes" and Si also means "yes" but used after a sentance with a negative. The same way we would say "on the contrary" but a bit more formal.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/natfogg83

agh i always hear people saying si si instead of just yes and it confuses me, i always learnt si = if and oui = yes and Si is only Yes in spanish!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heidijan
Heidijan
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And italian.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRealFlenuan
TheRealFlenuan
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And many other languages…

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jayda_70

Doesn't "si" literally translate to a slang of "yes" such as "yeah"? I tried "Yeah" and it told me that my answer was incorrect.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchbreadrules

Si means yes if you are replying to a negative question, such as "Tu n'as pas de frères ?" And you respond "Si, j'ai deux frères" because you are answering yes to a negative question.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

« Si » translates to "if" and "yet".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MegziiWegzii

Why not oui?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah-Cheung
Sarah-Cheung
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"Oui" should be accepted as well, although "si" works better in this case (with the exclamation mark at the end). There's a slight difference in the meaning.

-Tu comprends ?
-Oui, je comprends très bien.

-Tu ne comprends pas.
-Si, je comprends très bien !

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MegziiWegzii

Thank you :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AxeldelaTo3

"Si" is in Spanish!!! Why not "Oui"??

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huy_Ngo
Huy_Ngo
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In French, "si" can mean "yes" when it's to disagree with the other person:
"You do not understand!" - "Yes, I understand very well!"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

Is "Yes, I understand perfectly well!" a close enough translation to be accepted? It felt more natural to me than "very well".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel589120

This example is in the skill Conjunctions 2, does that mean that the "Si" here is the conjunction? In that case if it were "Non", would that also be considered a conjunction? Does anyone have a reference for a grammatical rule for using Si/Non as a conjunction when they imply yes/no?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLouise872063

No the only contradiction is the confusion DL is causing. The translation is correct and any other diversion from so or if to qui should be additional point discussed under negation, if that's what it is.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmantegassi
rmantegassi
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Why was this translation considered wrong: "Yes, I understand pretty well"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrew283

"Très" translates to "very" or "extremely". In English we use "pretty" before certain adverbs and adjectives to stress its mediocrity. "He can run pretty quickly" means that he runs sort of quickly. Maybe he runs more quickly than you had expected, but not "extremely" quickly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ioaemcl
ioaemcl
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Hmm. That's the literal truth. Unfortunately, English as spoken by the British is somewhat more subtle than that, so "pretty" or "quite", which can literally be used to stress mediocrity, can also be used to mean something that is very far from mediocre!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmantegassi
rmantegassi
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Hello, That seems a good explanation :-) Thank you for your time and attention.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quenekimber

So the comma is what one should look for to not interpret it as "if" and more of a forceful "YES!".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Algaenon

So si means if, yes, and so (as in so much)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexandraT513879

Si...but isnt that spanish...??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lala226217

Si.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jlearner987

Did anybody else get this wrong by writing good not well? XD Duolingo, learning us grammers.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
lukman.A
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In this phrase, the French's "si" has the same meaning with the Italian's "".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bensmith444
bensmith444
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I hope by this point in the course I do understand very well!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

《 Si 》 in this context means "yet" - any objections?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/taffyrm16

What's wrong with I very well understand?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/girly43

isn't si Spanish for yes as well...?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRealFlenuan
TheRealFlenuan
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It's "sí". So?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bilal-K

Couldn't it be "So, I understand very well"? In doulingo, the used "si" as "so" once.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRealFlenuan
TheRealFlenuan
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Those are two different meanings of "so". The definition you're thinking of is either the equivalent of the French ainsi or donc.

2 years ago