"Una persona ha dieci dita."

Translation:A person has ten fingers.

4 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/0523Emilio

Se hai risposto: "A person has ten toes". la risposta potrebbe essere sbagliata perché in italiano se dico dito intendo "della mano" se è di un piede devo specificare. Dire: "Mi sono rotto un dito di una mano", suona un po' male (a me) quindi dico "Mi sono rotto un dito" intendo di una mano se è di un piede lo specifico: "Mi sono rotto un dito di un piede" oppure menziono una mano in particolare, "Mi sono rotto un dito della mano sinistra". Secondo me, in italiano "A person has ten toes" si dovrebbe tradurre: "Una persona ha dieci dita dei piedi." Purtroppo non ho trovato nessun sito che avvalori la mia ipotesi, prendila come il commento di un povero ignorante, quindi da verificare. Ciao.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElOtroMiqui
ElOtroMiqui
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Come nel spagnolo! La parola "dedo" ha lo stesso significato.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gmj1892

So is dita the plural of dito?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silkwarrior

Yes, damn strange as it is :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BampaOwl
BampaOwl
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Quite a few common nouns follow the same pattern, including braccio/a, ginocchio (knee), labbro (lip), uovo, miglio.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silkwarrior

Thanks for additional info, have a lingot

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
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wow, really interesting and I never had it in all my languages ;-)

Have a lingot for these additional infos.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yael.h
Yael.h
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so "diti" would be wrong for fingers?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silkwarrior

Thanks for the question. Have just checked word reference and it appears to say thst "diti" is acceptable but thst "dita" is more common. I would welcome a post from an Italian explaining this apparent perversity. If "diti", the more regular form is acceptable, why do Italians seem to vote for msking life difficult? Or is wordref wrong/out of date?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/giorgia.folin

Diti is wrong. It's a common mistake children do, but it's not accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mfmeulenbelt

http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/plurali-doppi_%28La_grammatica_italiana%29/ At the bottom it says: the masculine plural is often figurative, and the feminine plural often literal. Perhaps when multiple Italians give someone the finger, you should use dita? Anyway since dito can either be toe or finger, I'm pretty sure that a normal human has 20 of them, not 10. You do have 10 fingers and 10 toes, but that makes 20 digits in total.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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On the other hand (!!!!), in English humans have 4 fingers and a thumb and on the other foot 5 toes. In total, that makes 8 fingers, 2 thumbs and 10 toes = 10 or 20 digits, depending on what a "digit" is.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/An_dz
An_dz
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Dita is the correct plural for all the fingers of a body.

Diti is in case you are talking about the same dito, like I miei diti indici (My index fingers). But you can use dita as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gilbrielder
Gilbrielder
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Yes, there's a curious and kind of knotty reason for it: whereas Italian has two grammatical genders, Latin had three: masculine, feminine and neuter. In Latin, many masculine words (whensoever they play the role of subject in a sentence) end in "-us", as singular inflection - which would turn into "-o", in Italian - and "-i", as plural inflection. We are already used to this framework. On the other hand, many neuter words, in singular (and whensoever they play the role of subject or direct object, in a Latin sentence), end in "-um" - which would also turn into "-o", in Italian. That's the case of Digitum (it. Ditto), Bracchium (it. Braccio), Ovum (it. Uovo). Those words will get an "-a", and not an "-i", in their plural inflection. Therefore, Digittum becomes "Digita" (it. Dita), "Bracchium" becomes "Bracchia" (it. Braccia), "Ovum" becomes "Ova" (it. Uova) and so on.

Then, by deduction, we could state: If an italian noun ending in "-o" gets an "-a" in its plural form, there's a high degree of certainty that it derives from a neuter Latin noun, and not from a masculine one (in which case it would get an "-i").

I am not so sure, but if it's like portuguese in this subject: all neuter words in latin would have become masculine words in italian, although keeping this interesting inflection o - a.

Any english mistake, my bad

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulmacd
paulmacd
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Your English is better than that of many native speakers!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yael.h
Yael.h
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Loved your explanation, thanks for the insight! Have a Lingot :)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leviny8594

In Latin, masculine and neuter nouns from the same declension use exactly the same endings unless they are the subject or direct object (nominative and accusative cases). Also, the second declension in Latin is made up of both masculine and neuter nouns, while the first declension is almost exclusively feminine, so it makes sense that neuter Latin words become masculine since those two genders are so closely related in Latin.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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I just looked it up. "dito" is masculine singular and "dita" is plural feminine

il dito - le dita

I'll have to go back and see if that's true for other o/a s/pl forms

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/giorgia.folin

Just a few that popped up: l'osso/le ossa (bone/bones), l'orecchio/le orecchie (ear, ears), il ginocchio/le ginocchia (knee/knees), il braccio/le braccia (arm/arms), il labbro/le labbra (lip/lips), l'uovo/le uova (egg/eggs). Probably there are many more.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ex3mity
Ex3mity
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why toes is wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wichito390
Wichito390
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toes for feet, fingers for hands; even when Duolingo doesn't specify it I think most people would first think about their hands... at least that's what I thought when I answered this question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imacb
imacb
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should be able to say "a person has ten digits"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DigitalMuaddib

Yep. Humans have eight fingers and two thumbs. We have ten digits. "Digits" would be the correct answer in this case.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nhinpraha
Nhinpraha
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Technically 10 digits as we have 8 fingers two thumbs.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iyphd
iyphd
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True, but who is counting.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Normally 20 digits - eight fingers, two thumbs, ten toes, but after frostbite who knows!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ex3mity
Ex3mity
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Ciao Emilio, la prendo come il commento di una persona intelligente e gentile, evidentemente hai ragione altrimenti non mi avrebbe dato errore… Sono su Duo da esattamente 36 giorni ma mi sembra di aver capito che talvolta se non hai ancora imparato una parola, lui di da da tradurre frasi che contengono le parole che hai studiato fino a quel momento, in questo caso finger era già stata spiegata mentre toe no, non so nemmeno come abbia fatto a venirmi in mente in realtà, ciò ciao e grazie ancora

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/agusnina

I think "dita" is for fingers or toes! isn't it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Yes

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Muyil
Muyil
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Highly frustrating when they (all too frequently) drop voice at end of sentence to inaudible pitch.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GirlRedE

Well, ideally...

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Folkmetallara

Trying to create a way to remember body parts which change from masculine to feminine in plural. How about "kiss your toes, bones, arms and ears" (labbro/labbra, dito/dita, osso/ossa, braccio/braccia, orecchio/orecchie). Yes I know you can't technically kiss your bones or ears but like a knife in the boot it helps me to remember them

2 months ago
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