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https://www.duolingo.com/elsentrix

When did you start Immersion translations?

elsentrix
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I've been learning German for about 2 months now, my main goal was to learn enough to help my kids learn German at school, but in all honesty my brain said screw that we're gonna learn to speak German because that is their heritage they should learn about their ancestors and be able to speak the language of their ancestors. So I am learning German. But I find myself looking at the immersion tab and freaking out... I've been in there a couple of times, I have no idea where to start and I look at the German texts and my brain goes to Plop mode. So questions are;

When did you start translating texts?
- Did you freak out too?

How do you find immersion? - Fun, weird, interesting, annoying?

4 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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When I was learning French on Duolingo, the system was a little different, and sentences for translation were offered in most skills after the lessons. I don't remember which skill was the first to contain translations, but that was something rather basic. The sentences offered contained some vocabulary from the skill and usually were not very complex, so I didn't freak out. When a sentence was too hard, I just chose another.

I played around with Immersion (which was called just Translation at that time) for a while and then dropped it. I didn't feel like translating from one foreign language to another (English is my second language), and articles in Immersion were never as interesting as books I soon started to read. I feel I gain more from just reading in the new language than from translating: translation adds writing and editing in another language in which I am already fluent. Moreover, I work as a translator, so translating something else after work does not look as fun as it may for other users :-)

I don't plan to use Immersion for Spanish or any other languages I may take on Duolingo, but I'm really happy there are so many users interested in Immersion: this means that Duolingo business model works. Personally, I prefer to contribute by helping others, removing clutter from the discussions and suggesting ideas.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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I can understand your reasoning, but I think you are actually one of the kind of users that should be there. Being an expert in the subject at hand, by observing our naivete you can better suggest constructive alterations or improvements to immersion, and probably better than any random ignorant user such as myself.

Also rather than translate, since it is already a full time job for you. Perhaps you can just upload and read articles, and let the users squabble over the translations by themselves. This is quite useful, I have uploaded at least two documents, one that was very simple, and which I was thanked for, and the other which was quite complex, but contained an interesting(and long) story that users seemed to enjoy.

Soon there will probably be a Russian course, and at that time you can assist the novice Russian learners with material that is easy, interesting, fun to read or translate, and useful to practice and learn your lovely (I presume) language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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When the Russian course arrives, I'll be happy to help Russian learners with the grammar and other language questions, but looking for stuff to translate or monitoring translation process is just not my field. Looks more like work than fun - I can't help it.

As for my possible suggestions, it seems that I'm often wrong in my assumptions about Immersion. I would never have thought people would actually care so much about translation quality, and this is still a mystery to me. Look at all these questions about guidelines, style, instructions - all that from people who are not paid for their translations. It's amazing. I take off my hat and try not to disturb the idyll :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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Indeed, I'm certain such help will be appreciated. I think you would be pleasantly surprised about immersion, and about suggesting something that seems ludicrous. Just shoot it, sometimes I just suggest something just to observe people with different views, and how passionate they get over it.

I'm no expert on psychology, so I wouldn't know this for a fact, but to me it is a rather simple thing. Some people unknowingly start to feel part of and have this sense of ownership towards the product. It is not the translation, it is my translation, it is not the sentence I translated, it is my sentence. It is not the article but my precious uploaded article, and I saw a post about someone complaining about a stolen precious ring (or translation). Overtime people develop this sense of ownership towards a product that doesn't even theoretically belong to them.

Perhaps you have not noticed it yourself, but for the vocabulary and practice sections of Duolingo, you probably feel as if it must improve. You've probably written enough about it to write a small book, that certain sense of ownership has probably developed in you as well.

Truly, users(or perhaps only I) all spend more time worrying about things that aren't even ours, and we are not even paid, for no reason other than what could be described as an addiction. We must get our daily fix of the owl otherwise something bad may happen.

So once again, I encourage you to join our shared practice of swimming with the piranhas in the immersion pool.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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Some people unknowingly start to feel part of and have this sense of ownership towards the product.

This is a very interesting suggestion, but it does not work for me with translations. The first thing I did after I started to get notifications about edits to my translations was to unsubscribe - most edits were preferential, so I did not learn anything useful from them. Maybe this has something to do with my work: I finished the project, I submitted it, I got paid for it, I don't care any longer :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALoUSyUseRnaME
ALoUSyUseRnaME
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Well, that was a while ago when I started but I didn't pick up the immersion section months after starting. Wait, actually never mind, I actually did, and yes, my brain did POP. Back then all articles were empty and DuoBot seemed to be the only translator! NO joke! I thought he was a Duolingo user LOL.

But back on track, slowly little by little I started getting used to it and it was really easy and I was a really good translator and I'm really happy that I went there when I first started. Nowadays when I look at my old translations and I shake my head and sigh...

But, the immersion section is WONDERFUL, FUN and one of the best things on Duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espi731

thanks to elsentrix, this is also my question. when should i start? or more clearly on what level? assume that i know nothing prior to learning on Duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Earlier than I should have. Immersion is fun. Will be more fun once they've smoothed out the Tier system. I started trying to edit too soon, and up voting some things I didn't fully understand. Thankfully, I only used down vote a few times, when the sentence was too complex but the English was clearly wrong by any standard regardless of the sentence. I'm really glad about that now.

4 years ago