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"Leginte la libron, mi estis preta por la ekzameno."

Translation:Having read the book, I was ready for the exam.

2 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JohnReid8
JohnReid8
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I noticed that "book" is in the accusative.

This confused me at first, but I'm guessing that the book has "received an action".

I hope that this helps other people that are not sure about this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Yes - the participle here is a bit adverb-y but still verb-y enough to take a direct object in the accusative case.

Compare "Mi legas la libron" with "Leginte la libron, ...".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
StephieRice
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Typically if you leave out the accusative after an adverb which is acting on an object then you would need a preposition to connect them.

De may work here but i am not sure how well it really fits as "leginte de la libro". It is certainly simpler to me to use the accusative in cases like this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jc_eca03
jc_eca03
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I think there is some misunderstanding... All the sentence "leginte la libron" works as an adverb. The adverbial participle "leginte" does not act on the object "la libron". All the sentence "Leginte la libron" specifies "when", related to the main sentence "Mi estis preta por la ekzameno." Then I think that "leginte de la libro" is not good.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jc_eca03
jc_eca03
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Specifies "when", or better, the "motive because i was ready for the exame".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
StephieRice
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The point was not about de, and hence why I specified that I am not sure if it would work.

The point was to explain the usage of the accusative case for words that are not direct objects, which in Esperanto is used to replace prepositions. It does it for a few things regularly but always based on the same rule, drop the preposition and add the accusative. Examples for which I can definitely give the correct prepositions include uses for time "je la dua/la duan", direction "en al la domo/en la domon", adverbs "inkluzive de la infano/inkluzive la infanon" and duration "dum la tuta tago/la tutan tagon"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/R_R1234
R_R1234
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Not if you had my professors...

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronstrelecki

Interesting... ek really means nothing here. I had hoped that affixes would be limited in their use to their specific meaning. In this case, ek-zamen-o... the beginning of some kind of sudden zamen. I guess a little arbitrary inconsistency is fine.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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And a kolego (colleague) is not called that because he has a long neck (kol-eg-o).

Sometimes Esperanto roots contain letters that are prefixes or suffixes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miestasmia
miestasmia
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Likewise bovino isn't wine obtained through marriage, though that'd be amusing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnMoser1

That sounds like an Italian thing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jc_eca03
jc_eca03
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I would say Latin. All those words are common to Italian, Portuguese, Spanish. In French I think they are a bit more "eroded" (but still resemble them in some way). (Excuse me the other Romances, the list is a bit long)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jc_eca03
jc_eca03
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In Portuguese: exame; colega; boi (the female is "vaca");

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnMoser1

What's the difference between "prepared" and "ready"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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In English? I would say the difference is small, but "prepared" suggests that preparation took place. Ready does not.

2 years ago